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D EDO? 02A2A47 E . 

California State Library [ \. 1 . 



119656 Received . "AY 1902. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/bresports39unse 



I 




SNAP SHOTS AT SACKAMKNTO TRACK. 
L Ch. o. Glide by Silver Bee 2:273£; owned by W. O. Bowers. 2. Assistant Secretary Lowden asks his favorite dog to do a stunt. 8. Bay colt by Bay Bird, dam by Imperious; owned 
by Ranoho del Paso. 4. Osbto 2:13V4, b. s. by McKinney; owned and driven by I. H. Mulholland. 5. Winnik Wii.kks, br. m. by Mambrino Wilkes; ownod by R. P. M. Greeley. 
6. Bay horse by.Waldstein, dam •by^ClayJDuke. .-In H.jS.jHogoboom'slstring 



■z 



[July 6, 1901 



Second Week at Denver. 



There was a good attendance all during the second 
week of the Denver meeting, and some high class racing 
was furnished. On Monday the 2:16 pace and 2:17 trot 
were decided, Jim Dixon winning the pace after live 
heats, and Dudie Egmont capturing the trot after a 
hard battle with Listerine and Ed Winship. W. G. 
Durfee mot with bad luck in the trot, his fast horse 
Charley Mac being distanced the first heat, owing to a 
bad break on the first turn in the opening heat. It 
was one of those stand still jimmies that put him out 
of it, and Durfee let him run nearly a half mile in an 
effort to got inside the tlag. The judges would not 
stand for this however, and declared Charley Mac dis- 
tanced. Durfeo brought the horse out between heats 
and drove him a mile very handily in 2:15. Listerine 
captured the first heat of this race in 2:15] but had 
tho red tlag waved in her face in the fourth heat. 

On Tuesday the 2:32 pace furnished a race that was 
full of excitement. The Colorado mare Queen B. won 
the first heat in 2:19} and got the flag in the next heat. 
Her owner, N. L. Brushe, raised the cry that his mare 
had been doped, but the judges did not believe him 
and the opinion was pretty generally expressed that 
Queen B. simply shot hor bolt in the first heat and was 
pumped out. The race was finally won by the bay 
mare Plenty by Superior, but Billy Durfee's mare 
Floretta Belle won two heats and gave her an argument 
in the others. The 2:1!> pace went to Lulu M. in 
•traight boats. 

On Wednesday Louise Jefferson and Winlield Stral* 
ton won their raseshandily. In the trot Dr. Shorb and 
Vic Shellar got second and third money respectively. 

Thursday was a California day for the harness 
brigade.- • Dr. Boucher's good four year old Harry 
Logan won the 2:40 pace in straight heats, pacing tho 
first two in 2:12', and seeming to be capable of making 
his mile in 2:10 without being pushed to his limit 
There is a general impression among the horsemen 
who have seen Harry Logan in his races that he will 
be a good winner on the Grand Circuit, and pace to a 
very low mark. 

Trainer C. E. Clark from Fresno won first money in 
the 2:40 trot with the mare Sue, a daughter of Atha- 
don. She won in straight heats and was not extended 
in anyono of them. 

In the first race on Friday, a pace for three year 
olds, Silvor Coin opened a strong favorite, and after 
the crowd saw him perform in the warming up before 
tho first heat, they hastened to get their money down 
on him, as he certainly looked superior to the other 
horses in the race. They got away good for the first 
heat, but Silver Coin acted badly, and Thornbud 
walked in and took the heat without much trouble. 
Little Girl, touted a sure winner for second money, 
came in fourth, and Silver Coin was sixth. There 
was a run to get the money down on Thornbud for the 
second heat, but tho books thought as much of him as 
the speculators, and didn't want the money. Silver 
Coin, at even money, went begging. The magnificent 
Steinway horse paced a beautiful race in the second 
heat and won easily from Thornbud. Tho fickle pub- 
lic flopped again, and in the third heat Silver Coin was 
the favorite. It was neck and neck between them un- 
til the stretch was reached, and here the paco got so 
fast that Silver Coin went up in the air, and, though 
Durfee brought him down rapidly and started him off 
again, Thornbud had too big a lead to overcome, and 
captured the heat and race. 

Vendora, the beautiful, won her race, a trot for the 
2:22 class, in three straight heats She easily out- 
classed tho other horses in the race and would move 
away from them at tho beginning of each heat and 
continue to open the distance to the end. Nellie 
Campbell did well in the first heat, but after that she 
was tired, and finally distanced in the last heat. 

The sensational feature of the last day's sport was 
the great performance of the gallant Colorado mare 
Lottie Smart. She has never in her career been in 
tho condition she is this season and she demonstrated 
that thoroughly Saturday by taking the great Ray- 
mond M. and E. S. around the track at a rate that 
made their heads swim. With Loomis driving hor she 
steppod throe heats in 2:08, 2:08} and 2:091, the three 
fastest heats that have ever boon paced on the Over- 
land track and establishing a now record for Colorado 
mares to try for and clipped lij seconds off her record. 
Shod4d pot break once during the three heats and it 
was by far the prettiest exhibition in harness that has 
boon seen during the meeting. 

On account of her performance last week when she 
won over Raymond M. and Bonnie Direct, she was 
made a favorito in the first heat, while Raymond M. 
and E. S. were selling for 2 to 1. They got away to a 
good start with Lottie Smart on the outside. Loomis 
was urging the mare on with tho evident intention of 
taking tho pole at the first turn, but in hor efforts she 
broke and the break was so disastrous that the field 
was too far ahead to be caught that heat. Around 



3 1 
2 1 
I 3 
di.s 
(lis 



the back stretch it looked as though she would get 
the flag, but Loomis brought her up strong in the 
stretch and while she finished third, she came with 
speed enough to show that she had her field outclassed. 

The next three heats wore easy for her. After the 
first heat was stepped and the time, 2:08, was hung out 
on the judges' stand the crowd appreciated that a phe, 
nomenal performance had occurred and cheered tho 
victor lustily as sho was driven back to the stand. As 
a result of this race it was conceded that Raymond M., 
at one time considered the best horse ever bred in Col- 
orado, will have to step down from his throne to make 
room for Lottie Smart. Francis Smart, the owner of 
the maro, is one of the best pleased men in Denver. 
For years he has pinned his faith to this mare and sho 
has given indications of great speed, but has never 
been handled correctly until this year and on account 
of hor inconsistent work the credit she should have 
won for an occasional fast boat was lost. Nothing 
could have been prettier than the manner in which she 
stopped the three heats yesterday and tho timo she 
made shows the rate at which she must have traveled. 

The 2:10 trot was a very peculiar race and the time 
of the last two heats, 2:30, was simply ridiculous. 
Toggles won the first two heats in fast time for a Cali- 
fornia horse at Denver but was winded and Clark asked 
permission to withdraw him. Whatever could have 
been the matter with Stamboulotte is not stated, but 
as he won a heat the week previous in 2:11 J his show- 
ing on the last day was simply ludicrous. Tho sum- 
maries of the weeks harness racing follow. 

MONDAY, JUNE 24. 
•J: 16 class, pacing, purse $500. 

John Dixon, blk h, George Dixou (Dolan) S 2 1 1 J 

D. D., b g (Conley) 4 3 2 2 2 

Belle Burton, blk m (Farge) 3 4 4 3 3 

Duchess, eh m, Pandolfa (Loomis) 1 1 3 <lis 

Time— 2:14*, 2:16H, 2:16!<, 2:20, isii%. 
2:17 class, trotting, purse $500. 

Dudie Egniout, blk m, Kgmont Chief-Maggie S 

(Loomis) 

Ed Winship, b g, Raymere (Johnson) 

Listerine, b m, Atbadon (Clarke) 1 3 3 dis 

Charlie Mac, blk g (Durfee) 

Kane, b g (Smith) 

Time-2:I5«, 2:16tf, 2:l«ii, 2:17*. 2:16*. 
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 
2;32 class, pacing, purse V**)- 

Plenty, b m, Superior (Kneebs) 6 14 3 11 

Floretta Belle, b m, State of Maine (Durfee) 5 3 1 12 2 

American Hal, r s (Covey) 7 4 2 2 dis 

Delphis.bg (Wallace) 5 2 3 4 dis 

Norvalelte, br m (Weaver) 3 6 5 dis 

Gold Standard, dun g (McGuire) 3 2 dis 

Blast, b g (Johnfion) 4 dis 

Queen B, ch f (Zibble) 1 dis 

Time-2:19«, 2:17;*, 2:2o*. 2:24, 2:24, 2:33. 
2.19 clasn, pacing, purse $50. 

Lulu M., b m Dupon, by Christopher H (McGuire) 1 1 1 

Riley C., grh l..(Strohm) 3 3 2 

Orval, b g (Zibble) 3 4 3 

Urba, br m (Cummings) 4 2 4 

Time— 2:I7K, 2:15*, 2:17*. 
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 38. 
2:25 trot; purse 110110. 
Louise Jefferson, br m, Jefferson-Hrown Bess (McGuire) 2 111 

Dr. Shorb, blk g (Durfee) 3 2 3 2 

VicShiller.bg (Van Bokelen) 4 4 2 4 

George M., ch g (Connellyi 6 3 2 3 

Otto Wilkes, br s (Covey) 4 5 5 d 

Viometa, ch m iWeaverj I d 

Time-2:20'/i 2:17*. 2:18, 2:17*. 
2:23 paco; purse $500 

Winfleld Stratton, b s, Sata nay-Blue Bull (Loomis) I 1 1 

Arline B., ch m (Johnson) 2 2 2 

Eva Victor, bm (Connelly) 4 3 4 

IrvinC.bg (Smith) 6 4 3 

Martha B. t b m (Beecher) 3 5 d 

Buena, ch m (Weaver) 5 6 d 

Time-2:15*, 2:17^. 2:16. 
THURSDAY, JUNE 27. 
Pacing, 2:40 class; purse $500. 

Harry Logan, ch g, Harry Gear-Miss Logan (Boucher) 

Plenty, b g (Kneebs) 

Gold Standard, dun g (McGuire) 

Florelta Belle, b m (Durfee) 

Allie, b m (Murphy) 

Time— 2:12*, 2:12*. 2:15*. 
Trotting, 2:40 class; purse $500. 

Sue, br m, Atbadon (Clark) 

Dr. Shorb, blk g (Durfee) 

Commonwealth, bs (Zibblei 

Emblematic, cm (Covey) 

Time— 2:18*. 2:20*. 2:18*. 
FRIDAY, JUNE 28. 
Pacing, three year olds, 2:50 class, purse $500 

Thornbud. be, Thorndyke-Ida (Chapiui 

Silver Coin, b s, Steinway (Durfee) 

Little Girl, b c (Smith) 

Francis Dunleavy. b f (Conley i 

Senator, ch s, J. F. Church (Fulkardi 

Vindicator, be i Loomis) 

Time— 2:I8M, 2:16*. 2:18*. 
Trotting. 2:22 e'ass, purse $500. 

Vendora, b m. Vendor-Capitalist (Smilli) 

Tom Smith, br s, i Van Bokkeleni 

Dr. Calder. b g (Williamson) 

Nellie Campbell, bm (Zibbell) 

Time-2:23*, 2:21. 2:20. 
SATURDAY, JUNE 29 
Free for all pace, purse $500. 

Lottie Smart, ch m .Roswell-Sabain (Loomis) 3 

Ravmond M , blk S, Thorndvke (Casadvi I 

E. S., blk 6 (Ruby) 2 

Time— 2:12, 2:08, 2:08'.,. 2:08* 
2:10 class, trotting, purse $500. 
Trilby, b m, Tipton Nutwood, by Lexington Wilkes 

(McGuire) 3 2 

Stamboulotte, b s iVan Bokkelen) 2 3 

Toggles, br g, Strathway (Clark) I 1 

Time— 8:14% 2: is, 2:18*, MO, 2:30. 



1 1 

2 2 

3 3 

4 4 
dis 



1 I 1 

2 3 2 

3 2 3 
dis 



1 



1 



6 1 2 
4 3 3 

4 4 ds 

3 ds 

5 ds 



1 1 I 

3 2 3 

4 3 2 

2 4 ds 



1 1 1 

3 a a 



I I I 
3 d"r 



The Boston Globe of June 24th printed a large hal' 
tone engraving of Who Is It 2:10] with a caption: 
"With this gray trotter Tom Marsh hopes to win 
some of the 2:11 classes." 



Hamlin's Almont Jr. 

H. L. Allen writes as follows of Almont Jr., tho 
stallion which Mr. Hamlin first purchased to head his 
stud at Village Farm: 

"Hamlin's Almont Jr. 2:26, the greatest son of Al- 
mont by the records (?), and one of the sires that has 
assisted in making western New York famous as a 
breeding place for fast trotters and pacers, has for the 
past three or four years been kept on the farm of S. M. 
Thomas of Franklinville, and, although still owned by 
the Hamlins, probably will end his days on the farm 
where he now is. Almont Jr. is now twenty-nino years 
old, but he looks a dozen years younger. He still 
carrries himself as proudly as ever, and the trappy 
action with which he uniformly endows his get, thus 
enabling them to outact the Hackneys in the show 
ring, is still noticeable when he is started up. Few 
horses of Almont Jr.'s are of any value for breeding 
purposes, but he still is vigorous, and next year will 
see another crop of foals added to those he has sired in 
previous years. In some respects, Almont Jr. is the 
most remarkable sire ever owned in western New 
York. He was brought here when trotting-horse 
breeding in this end of tho State was in its infancy . 
The mares he has mated with during the first tan 
years of his reign at Village Farm were, with very fow 
exceptions, bred in very weak lines, as compared' with 
those now occupying Itho paddocks at the great Brie 
County brooding establishments. One of his earliest 
foals was Belle Hamlin, the first Erie County bred 
trotter to beat 2:20 and she was quickly followed by 
Globe 2:I4J and Justina 2:20, and the trio becamo 
famous for their exploits hooked in double and triple 
harness. Other fast ones came from the youngsters 
sired by Almont Jr. until he was recognized as one of 
the great speed sires. Then Mambrino King came to 
Village Farm and Almont Jr. was relegated to second 
place. Later on Chimes was bought and Almont Jr. 
was placed still farther in the backgronnd, until after 
a time he was sent to the Cattaraugus County farm, 
whore he now is. The blood of the son of Almont, 
however, did not stop with his vanishment, for some of 
the crack trotters and pacers produced at Village 
Farm carried his blood. Such race horses as Lord 
Derby 2:07, Moonstone 2:09, Battloton 2:09^, Charles 
Sumner 2:10}, Passing Belle 2:08}, Valence 2:12^, 
Sphere 2:13], Germaino 2:15| and many others with 
fast records were produced by daughters of Almont 
Jr., and his daughters also are the grandams of Fan- 
tasy 2:06, Tudor Chimes 2:13, Midnight Chimes 2.16 1 ,, 
Palo Alto Chimes 2:17i, Charming Chimes 2:17A, 
Chimes Boy 2:17} and other fast ones. No less than 
fourteen of Almont's Jr.'s sons have also sired stand- 
ard speed. What position he would have occupied 
had he been given such opportunities in the stud as he 
could have boon given can only be conjectured, but it 
is safe to say that he would havo rivaled some of tho 
sires now placed far ahead of him in public opinion. 
With the lack of opportunity which has been a 
feature of the last fifteen years of his life ho still is a 
great sire, and one whose blood long will exert an in- 
fluence on tho American trotter. 

Meeting of the State Fair Diretors. 

A meeting of the Directors of the California Stair 
Agricultural Society was held in Sacramento last 
Saturday, those present being Directors Cox, Johnson 
Covey, Terry, Paine, Harris, Rush. 

On motion of Mr. Johnson it was decided to employ 
Architect James Seadler to examine the grandstand at 
the race track and report on its condition at the next 
meeting of tho board. 

The election of Secretary of tho society being de- 
clared in order, Grove L. Johnson placed in nomina- 
tion George W. Jackson of Sacramento. 

C. W. Paine seconded the nomination, and no other 
candidates being named, Mr. Jackson was elected by a 
unanimous vote. 

On motion of Mr. Paine, Secretary Jackson was in- 
structed to confer with tho members of the Sacramento 
Street Fair Club, with respect to the best methods of 
advertising the coming State Fair. 

On motion of Mr. Terry it was decided to give two 
harness and four running ovonts each day of tho fair. 

The matter of securing music for tho Park and Pavil- 
ion was referred to tho Executive Committee, with 
power to act. 

On motion of Mr- Johnson, Friday, September 6th, 
was set apart as "Drummers' Day." 

On motion of Mr. Terry it was decided to suspend 
the entire free list on the two Saturdays (September 
7th and 14th) at both the park and pavilion. 

On motion of Mr. Rush tho present office force in the 
Secretary's office was ordered retained. 

Tho board adjourned until Saturday. August 10th. 

Throe road horses changed hands in Now York one 
day last week at prices that ranged from $1500 to *2.">oo. 
They were all sold at private sale and none had records. 



July 6, 1901] 



Frank Frazier and Chehalis. 



Be Caretul of Patterns. 



Cleveland Track Notes. 



Allen Lowe, who conducts a department in the 
Boston News, some times since wrote an article in con- 
nection with the sale of the pacer Chehalis 2:04 \. that 
has caused Frazier to come into print himself in de- 
nial of the statement. Among other things Mr. Lowe 
said : 

"For a man who got such good money for a hoppled 
pacer, Frazier did not act as though he was happy. 
He openly admitted that Chehalis would not continue 
his victorious career, and hinted that he had not given 
up the key to the control of the horse. This and other 
things give rise to the belief that Frazier did not own 
the son of Altamont. Recent developments point to 
the belief that the ownership, by Mr. Hayes, ceased 
some time ago, and that it has reverted to a well- 
known ice cream maker in Boston. It is said, and I 
believe the authority to be competent, that the passing 
of Chehalis through the Fasig-Tipton sale was only a 
preliminary to the announcement of the change of con- 
trol, which had already been completed. It is now an 
open secret that Frazier has been sent for and is to 
take up the training of the horse for the coming season. 
Frazier claimed when the pacer was sold that he could 
beat 2:02 with him three times in a race. If this were 
even nearly correct, Chehalis can beat any pacer that 
ever raced; for no such ability has ever been displayed, 
even bv Star Pointer, the greatest pacer the world has 
yet known. The owner believes that Frazier can beat 
the record which Chehalis has by a couple of seconds 
very easily, and has planned a coup which : if it is suc- 
cessful, would put a crimp in the talent. It is his in- 
tention to name him in any free for all that can bo 
framed. He will be able to put a moderate bet on his 
horse to win a barrel of money, and as the horse is not 
rated in the front rank, he certainly can do so if 
Frazier can get the pacer to race as well as he thinks 
he can. Three times in 2:02 or better will beat the best 
pacer out this year a block. It is hardly likely that 
Chehalis will race better for Frazier than he has for 
Jere O'Neil. If he can there is no question that he will 
start with a long price against him." 

In answer to Mr. Lowe's article Mr. Frazier writes 
to the North Pacific Rural Spirit, as follows, from 
Portland, Ore.: 

"Yours of the 24th to hand, enclosing article on 
Chehalis and myself, written by Lowe. I know him 
personally and talked to him about Chehalis, but never 
made any such assertions about Chehalis as he stated. 
Even if I thought Chehalis could go one heat in 2:02, I 
would be a fool to say that he could go three heats in 
any such time. I know the horse could at one time 
have gone in 2:03 or better, but I don't know about 
2:02. I also know that up to the present time O'Neil 
has not given the horse a chance, and I don't think he 
can drive him in a race anywhere near what the horse 
is capable of doing. I know the horse was outside the 
money in races he should have won and it was not the 
horse's fault. There is no horse easier to drive than 
Chehalis when he is right and driven by one who has 
horse sense. As for me going Ea6t to drive him there 
is nothing in it, as I have not been asked to do so and 
do not think I am likely to, as no one would pay me 
enough to justify me in going. I don't know that the 
horse could win in his class, but if I owned him and he 
was as good as he is capable of being, I should be per- 
fectly willing to take a chance in any held of horses on 
earth. I don't think there are four horses living that 
can put him outside the money when he is good and 
going good. He is a better horse than the public thinks 
he is." 

A Warm Endorsement. 



San Francisco, July 1, 1001. 
Editor Breeder and Sportsman — Dear 8ir: I 
was greatly pleased to hear through a friend of the 
selection of genial George W. Jackson by the directors 
of the State Agricultural Society as the successor of 
Judge Peter J. Shields as secretary of the Society. It 
is great pleasure for me to testify to his high moral 
worth and his business capacity, which coupled with 
his habit of making truthful representations to all will 
make him a universal favorite. I congratulate the 
board of directors, the whole State of California, also 
Judge Shields in obtaining Mr. Jackson's services to 
that important position, f know of no one who more 
justly deserves good fortune, and of no person who 
will use it more worthily. The public will find Mr. 
Jackson a genial, friendly fellow, and will most as- 
suredly not regret his selection as secretary of the 
State Agricultural Society. I predict his future a 
success. Yours truly, 

Samuel Gamble. 



The chief aim of many beginners in speed develop- 
ment is to imitate the method followed by somo eminent 
trainer in developing and bringing to racing form 
some celebrated horse. On the surface this would seem 
logical enough, but the application is not practical. 
The average boginnor thinks to himself, "Now, if I 
can only work my horse as Ketcham works Cresceus 
or as Geers works The Abbot, I will get the money 
sure." Cresceus and The Abbot are world's champions 
and Ketcham and Geers are certainly groat trainers, 
but no two horses in the country are more differently 
trained than are The Abbot and Cresceus. So, after 
all, patterns are not always good things to follow. 
Cresceus gets no fast work only in races, while The 
Ab'iot is raced and raced, against the watch, for weeks 
and weeks before there is any money ir sight. "Well," 
says one, "one or the other of these fellows must be 
away off in his methods. Which is It?" Neither, 
They have very different horses to work, and the very 
fact that they work them differently is the best evi- 
dence that they both understand their business. It is 
all well enough for the less experienced trainers to 
study the methods of the great ones, but it should be 
remembered, meanwhile, that great trainers become 
great largely through their study of the mental and 
physical individuality of the horses they drive, and 
not through the application of superior stereotyped 
methods. While studying great trainers, therefore, it 
is just as essential for the "hopes-to-bes" to study 
horse — horse anatomy, horse physiology, horse phre" 
nology, horse mentality and horse temperament. One 
horse needs a lot of slow work and but little or no fast 
work, while another needs a lot of fast work and but 
little or no jogging. One needs to be licked into your 
way of thinking, another needs to be coaxed to it, 
while another still must be permitted to have a mind 
of his own. Some horses have errors of gait which 
have to be corrected before they can go a little bit, 
while others have errors of gait, which, if you correct, 
makes them slower than a bashful boy at an apple 
<;utting It is knowing when not to do a thing, as well 
as knowing how to do a thing, that has much to do 
with a trainer's success, and patterns should be fol- 
lowed cautiously. — Western Horseman. 



News from the North. 



Successfully Used Caustic Balsam. 

Forest vii.le, Mu., Jan. 4, 1901. 
I have used a ureal deal of Gombault's Caustic Balsam and have 
been very successful with it. What can you sell me the Caustic 
Balsam for bj the dozen bottles? E. E. Berry. 



[Portland Rural Spirit.] 
C. P. Webb is giving his pacer, Prince Tom, regular 
work, and intends to start him in some rich stakes 
this fall. 

A. T. Van De Vanter has shipped his stallion Erect 
over to Seattle, where a number of mares are awaiting 
to be bred to him. 

The horsemen say that the track at Salem is better 
and faster than it has ever been, and if weather per- 
mits some record breaking time will be made there 
this fall. 

Albert Pratt is now located at the fair grounds with 
his pacer Scappoose 2:16]. She is looking fine and 
will give somebody a horse race this season if they 
beat her. 

Mr. Beckers writes us that he is doing a splendid 
business with Zombro at Salenj- Mares are coming 
from all directions. He has already bred thirty-one 
mares since his arrival there. 

J. B. Stetson of Boise, Idaho, will take his stable of 
horses to Salem next week. He has among others the 
trotting mare Lady Alfred 2:19} and Major Rudd 2:30. 
He has sold Lyla 2:27; Alatiel, full sister to Chehallis 
2:04}, and Madeline G., and Manila. 

J. W. Tilden will leave this week for Everett, Wash., 
with his stable of trotters and pacers. Ho will take 
with him Package 2:24}, May Tilden 2:29}, Nellie 
Coovert, throe year old pacer, Mary Scott, green 
trotter, and Hattio Holly, a two year old trotter. 

L. C. McCormick has placed his two year old, E. O. 
Mc, by McKinney, in Sam Casto's stable, whore ho will 
receive his first education as a trotter. E. O. Mc is 
entered in tho big two year old stake at tho State Fair 
this fall, and he has every quality to dovolop into a 
fast trotter. 

John E. Kirkland is now training over tho track at 
Salem. He has Ben Bolt 2:18, Mark Hanna and Susie 
Aleno, both green trotters, and Aim, a three year old 
pacer. Ben Bolt and Mark Hanna are owned by Con- 
gressman Thomas H. Tongue; Susie Alone by C. M. 
Kirkland and Aim by the Holmes Farm Company. 

Just as Advertised. 

An indignant Woking farmer returned to a horse 
dealer's about an hour after purchasing a horse. 

"Look here, sir," ho exclaimed, "I don't want this 
horse you sold me. Ho shies. I can't get him across 
the bridge." 

"That's the reason I sold him," said tho dealer, 
calmly. "Why did you come to me for tho horse?" 

"I saw your advertisement in tho paper." 

"I thought so. I gave my reason for selling him." 

"Yes; to be sold, you stated, for no other reason 
than that the owner wants to go out of town." 

"Well, if you can go out of town with him," said the 
dealer, "it will be more than I can do." — Loudon 
Answers. 



[American Sportsman, June 27 J 

Tuesday morning was devoted to fast work-outs at 
Glenville, all the famous trainers now quartered at the 
most popular of all tracks being out with two or more 
of the horses. It is needless to say that tho railbirds, 
watches in hand, woro alsooutin full force. Whore all 
did so Well, it is difficult to discriminate by saying who 
carried off the honors. Tho fastest mile trotted, how- 
ever, was by Directum Kelly, tho champion trotting 
stallion of 1899, who negotiated the mile in 2:11}, the 
first quarter being in 34} seconds, the first half in 1:07, 
the three-quarters in 1 :4"(), making the last quarter in 
31J seconds. This is by far the fastest mile the famous 
son of Direct has trotted since 1899, a mile in 2:25 hav- 
ing been his best previous performance this season. 
Notwithstanding tho fast clip ho was asked to go, he 
finished strong as his last half in 1:04J will show. 

Dolly Dillon 2:1 1 ^ , holding her head high in tho air, 
stepped a mile in 2:14, the time by quarters being 0:33-;, 
l:07f, 1:40$, 2:14. Her stable mate, .Janice, as smooth a 
gaited trotter as ever passed under the wire, was also 
moved by Millard Sanders, her fastest tnilo being 9:34'.. 
1:09, 1:43, 2:16. 

Harry Stinson, as usual, was "doing" something out 
of the ordinary. Having made tho colt handlers open 
their eyes by the way he was showing speed with his 
youngsters, he showed up with J. T. Dewey's stallion 
Gaudaur by Guy Wilkes. After warming him up in 
2:49.! and 2:21£hegave him the word and Gaudaur flew 
around the track with scarcely any urging, making 
the mile in 2:16$, tho last half in 1:08!, the last quarter 
in 33} seconds. A "cooler" in 2:24 sent Gaudaur to the 
barn. Stinson also drove Mary Gage, a two year old 
by Oro Wilkes, a quarter in 40 seconds to a cart and 
gave Pearl Oro, another Oro Wilkes two year old, a 
quarter in 44 seconds, also to cart. 

Ed Geers was out early with The Abbot, the cham- 
pion's fastest mile being in 2:21, tho last half in 1:07J. 
Geers also worked Onward Silver a mile in 2:16 ', and 
gave several of his youngsters somo brisk quarters. 

Lafe Shafer attracted much attention with J. C. Mc- 
Kinnoy's $17,000 stallion Beausoant by Bow Bells. 
Shafer and Ed Benyon worked together, Ben yon driv- 
ing the four year old mare Zyba by Allio Wilkes. 
Their fastest mile was in 2:21, tho last half in 1:08}. 
Beauseant showed himself to be a finely gaited animal 
with plenty of speed. 

Jim Thompson gave Algoneta by Eros, his M. and M. 
candidate, a mile in 2:20, Edmund B 2:12}, owned and 
driven by Doc Tanner, beating her out at the finish. 
Lucille and Directum Kelly went a mile together in 
2:20, the last half in 1:07£. Lucille also tore off an 
eighth in 15} seconds. Tanner drove Mabel Onward 
three miles, tho first being in 2:21, tho last two being 
in 2:18. Other creditable performances by the trotters 
were a quarter in 31 seconds by Dollie Dillon, a quarter 
by Lucille in 32}, a half by Beauseant in 1:06 J, 

Hetty G. was driven several good miles by Scott Mc- 
Coy, the fastest being 2:15J, last half in 1:05$, without 
the hopples, and 2:12} last half in 1:04! with tho 
hopples. 

Goshen Jim reeled off a milo in 2:14! for Jim Thomp- 
son and would have gone better than 2:10 had Thomp- 
son let him, as he went to the quarter in 31!, to the 
half In 1:04! and finished strong with Thompson 
pulling. 

Captivity, the chestnut filly by Sidney Dillon, owned 
by Henry Sanders, was driven a half in 1:08}, the last 
quarter in 33} seconds, by Millard Sanders, Monday. 

One of the best performances to dato at the Glen- 
ville track was when the trotter Venus II, owned by 
Adolph Sprockles, was stepped a half in 1:02! by 
Millard Sanders. 

C. A. Winship of Los Angeles, Cal., who has been at 
the Glenville track for over a month and who sold tho 
filly Zephyr to J. C. McKinney, of Titusville, Pa., has 
gone to Buffalo, leaving his sale horses, Aster 2:12 by 
Dexter Prince, Lady Waldstein 2:15 by Waldstein, 
Vernie McGregor 2:26 by Invincible and Pacific King 
by Diablo 2:09] with Vance Nuckols. 



Primrose Paces in 2:10. 

At tho matinee of the Los Angeles Driving Club held 
last Saturday, Mr. M. M. Potter drovo his littlo maro 
Primrose by Falroso a mile in 2:10, thus lowering tho 
Coast amatour record a couple of seconds. There woro 
fully 2000 people in attendance and tho day's sport was 
the best that has over been furnished by tho popular 
club whoso matinees are tho leading feature of South- 
ern California sports. In addition to the fast milo 
paced by Primrose, Mr. Potter furnished another sen- 
sation by driving his mare Sweot Mario by McKinnoy 
two heats each in 2:14 Sat, and could have mado tho 
second heat faster. 

Following is a summary of the races: 

Three minute class, 2 in 3: 

Lamusa (J. Eel ton) 2 1 1 

Louise (Dr. J. Dcliarth Shorb) I :i :! 

Bessie (M. M. Potter) 8 2 i 

Time, 2:35-2:38'/ s — 2:39. 

2:25 class, 2 In 3: 

p lo (J. W Spooner) I I 

Chico (P- Brown) 2 2 

Sweetheart (M.M.Potter) 3 3 

Bastena (Kenneth Reapatn) 4 4 

Time, 2:17-2:17'/,. 
2:30 class, 2 in 3: 

Tom Moore (Dr. M. L. Moore) I 1 

Maud McKinney (M.M.Potter) 3 2 

Bruce ( Dr - George L. Cole) 2 3 

Time. 2:26'J— 2:25. 

Match race, 2 in 8: 

Sweet Marie (M.M.Potter) 1 1 

Montecito Boy (J. Eel ton) 2 2 

Time, 2:14-2:14. 

Exhibition milo to beat 2:12: Primrose (M. M. l'otter) won. 
Time, 2:10. 



4 



(The gvsebev cixxb ^povi&txxan 



[July 6, 1901 



THE WEEKLY 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

— OFFICE — 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O BOX 2300. 



Terms— One Year S3. Six Months SI. 75, Three Months SI 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. \V. Keixey, 36 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 

O. G. TUKR1 & CO., Agents. Subscription and advertising. 

Salisbury Building, Melbourne, Australia 



San Francisco, Saturday, July 6, iooi. 



Dates Claimed. 

VANCOUVER, B. C July 1-2 

" ■' Aug. 31 to Sept. 1 

DENVER, Col June 15-29 

BUTTE and ANACONDA June 29-60 days 

EVERETT, Wash Sept. 9-15 

BOISE, Idaho (State Fair) Sept, 16-21 

CARSON CITY, Nev Sept. 22-28 

SALEM, Oregon (State Fair) Sept. 23-28 

NEW WESTMINSTER I'mvitirkil Fair) Oct. I 5 

LA GRANDE, Oregon Oct. 1-5 

THE DALLES, Oregon (District Fair) Oct. 1-5 

LEWISTON. Idaho ( Int. i- Stat.- Fain Oct. 7-12 

VICTORIA, B. C Oct. 7-12 

BAKER CITY, Oregon October 6-12 

SPOKANE, Wash ;Sept. 10-21 

THE GRAND CIRCUIT. 

DETROIT '. July 15-20 

CLEVELAND July 22-27 

COLUMBUS luly 29 to Aug. 3 

BUFFALO Aug. 5-10 

GLENS FALLS Aug. 12-17 

READVILLE Aug. 19-24 

HARTFORD Sept. 2-6 

SYRACUSE Sept. 9-13, 

PROVIDENCE Sept. 26-30 

TERRE HAUTE Sept. 30 to Oct. 5 

CALIFORNIA. 

P. C. T H. B. A., SACRAMENTO July 29 to Aug. 3 

WOODLAND, District No. 40 August 2tS-3! 

CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR. Sacram-ulo Sept. 2-14 

FERNDALE, Humboldt Sept. 10-14 

STOCKTON Sept. 16 to 21 

CONCORD, (District No. 23) Sept. 23 to 28 

LOS ANGELES Sept. 28 to Oct. 12 incl 

WXEL HOLD MEETINGS. 

WILLOWS, Glenn Co July or August 

SANTA ANA, Cal October 

SALINAS Septombor 

BISHOP, Cal September or October 

SANTA ROSA, Cal August or September 



Stallions Advertised. 



TROTTING BRED. 

McKINNEY 2:11H C. A. Durfee, San Jose 

NUTWOOD WILKES 2:16!', Martin Carter, Irving ton 

II A CKN KYs. 

GREEN'S RUFUS The Bay wood Stud. San Mateo 

EIGHT RICH RUNNING STAKES are advertised 
to-day by the California State Agricultural Society 
and the attention of tho owners of thoroughbred 
horses is called to thorn. Entries to them will close 
August Ud, and the remainder of the running program, 
for which liberal pursos will be given, will be announced 
September 1st. It will provide for four or more run- 
ning races each day. The stakes advertised to day are 
the Flash Stake, six furlongs, for all ages, $10 entrance, 
$400 added; tho Shafter Selling Stake, for two year 
olds, six furlongs, $10entrancj, $300 added; Sacramento 
State Fair Selling Stake, for three year olds and up. 
wards, one mile, $10 entrance, $400 added; the Vinctor 
Stake, for throe year olds and upwards, one mile, $10 
entrance, $500 added; tho Sunny Slope Stake, for two 
year old fillies, five furlongs, $10 entrance, $1100 added, 
the Governor's Stake, handicap for throe year olds 
and upwards, ono mile and a furlong, $10 entrance 
$400 added; the California State Fair Annual Stake, 
handicap for two year olds, six furlougs, $10 entrance, 
$500 added; the President's Stake, handicap for three 
year olds and upwards, ono mile and a quarter, $10 
entrance. $500 added. 



EVERY STAKE IS FILLED is the announcement 
of the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' 
Association in regard to the six $1000 stakes advertised 
for its Sacramento meeting. This is the first time in 
years that every one of tho early closing stakes adver- 
tised by the Breeders' has filled, and it augurs well for 
a most successful meeting and something like the old- 
time interest in harness racing. The owners and 
trainers have done nobly, and the splendid list of en- 
tries which is published in full in another column will 
>»• read with great interest by every horseman in Cali- 
fornia. Six stakes of $1000 each are not to be raced 
for every week, even over in the Eastern States, and 
the Breedors' Association and the owners who have 
beon so liberal with their entries are to be congratu- 
lated on the fine showing made and the splendid pros- 
pects for a most successful week of racing at Sacra- 
mento. The meeting will open the California circuit 
and will offer the best opportunity to race for large 
purses of any meeting to be held on this Coast this year. 
In our advertising columns to-day will be found a list of 
additional stakes, in which the amounts range from 
$600 to $300, and which provide for every possible class 
of horses in training in California. Entries to theso 
classes will close July 15th, two weeks from next Mon- 
day. There is a chance here for ovory horse that is 
not named in the stakes already closed, and as the 
prospects are for a large attendance at Sacramento and 
lively betting on results, there will bo more opportuni- 
ties to make money with a winner than has been 
offered at harness races for some time in this State. 
The Breeders' Association has made a grand start. 
Now if all will make a united effort tho circuit of 1901 
in California will be one of the most successful ever 
given, even though it will bo limited to a half dozon 
meetings. 



P. C. T. H. B. A. Stake Entries. 



AN EXCELLENT SELECTION has been made by 
tho State Board of Agriculture in unanimously 
electing Mr. George W. Jackson of Sacramento as its 
Secretary. Mr. Jackson has long been a resident of 
Sacramento and is ono of the capital city's most re- 
spected citizens. He is energetic, intelligent and trust- 
worthy and fow men of affairs are as popular with tho 
people as he. For many years he was superintendent 
of tho Capital Gas Company, filling the position not 
only with credit to himself but to tho entire satisfaction 
of his employers and the many patrons of the corpora- 
tion. A gentleman of much more than average ability 
ho lias already entered upon his duties with the deter- 
mination to servo the Board of Directors and the State 
in a manner that will receive the endorsement of all, 
ana wo feel certain that his occupancy of the respon- 
sible position will be of great advantage to the State 
Agricultural Society and increase the popularity and 
succes of the annual State Fair at Sacramento. 



THE OAKWOOD PARK FARM will sell fifty 
1 grandly bred horses at auction next Friday at 
the Occidental Horse Exchange in this city. There 
are young mares in the consignment well bred enough 
and having- all tho requisites for first class broodmares; 
there are young horses with good looks, sound limb s 
and natural speed that will make high class road or 
race horses; there are stallions that are suitable to 
place in the stud and command large patronage. Al^ 
theso horses are well broken. They are ready to put 
on the road or track. They are by such sires as Chas. 
Derby, Steinway. El Benton, Don L, Prince Red and 
the thoroughbred horse Major Ban. Every horseman 
knows the value of Oakwood Park Stock Farm horses. 
This consignment is one of the best lots that over left 
this celebrated farm. Catalogues are out and can be 
had from William G. Layng, Auctioneer, at 721 How- 
ard street. 



Runners at Auction at Honolulu. 



A TELEGRAM FROM SANTA ROSA "received, 
just as we go to press states that the Santa Rosa 
Jookoy Club has decided to give a meeting from the 
12th to tho 17th of August inclusive and will announce 
a program of harness and running races in the 
Breeder and Sportsman next week. Santa Rosa 
has one of the best tracks in America and the new club 
is composed of active and energetic citizens who will 
spare no pains to make the meeting a success in every 
particular. 

Glide, W. O. Bowel's' good colt by Silver Bee, is one 
of tho best looking colts at tho Sacramento track. 
His picture on our front page is proof of this assertion 
and it docs not Hatter the colt in the least. 



Geo. S. McKenzie, who resides at Hilo, H. L, dis- 
posed of a number of thoroughbreds at auction at 
Honolulu after the closo of the running meeting there 
June 15th. The prices obtained were as follows: 

General Cronje sold to George Rodiek for $550. 

Billy McClosky sold to Harry Evans for $560. 

Socialist sold to R. Ballentyne for $1,400. 

Molly Connors sold to R. Ballentyne for $950. 

Morrel's Faust sold to Tom, "Waiakea," Wilson for 
$200. 

W. W. Wolters' Gaiety Girl was also put up, but 
no bid being forthcoming, was withdrawn. 



Before Steinway was brought to California he was 
bred to Nod, tho dam of five in the list, and the result 
of that mating was Steinette, that is now the dam of 
Baron de Stein by Baron Wilkes. Baron de Stein is 
the only seven-year-old stallion that has a trotter to 
his credit with a record as low as 2:101. This is Harry 
Barrett, a trotter that took his record last year. 

Al McDonald has What Is It by Direct, out of the 
dam of Who Is It 2:10J, looking in fine shape at the 
Sacramento track. 



2:40 Class Trotting Stakes— SIOOO. 

Z. E. Drake's b g Billie L. 

Albert Joseph's ch m Floradora by Sable Steinway, dam Pearl 
by Blue Bull. 

A. G. Gurnett's What Is It by Direct, dam Lassie Jean by Briga- 
dier. 

Robert Freeman's b g Prince L. by Escort, dam Queen L. 

I. H. Mulholland's br g Peter Jackson by Designer, dam by 

Abbotsford. 

P. H. Quinn's blk h Black Bart by Robin, dam by Williamson's 
Belmont. 

Ho Yow's b m Chinamaid by McKinney, dam Blanchward by 
Onward. 

D. F. Oglesby's br sJAlmonada by Eros, dam Maggie by Nutwood . 

Vendomo Stock Farm's b m Nora McKinney by McKinney, dam 
Lady by Dexter Prince. 

W. S. Maben's b g Doctor Mac by McKinney, dam by Bob Mason. 

T. C. Cabney's, b m Sigart by Mustapha, dam Rapidan by Over, 
land; br m Pearl K. by Wayland W., dam by Giand Moor. 

2:14 Class Trotting— Purge 81000. 

W. S. Maben's gr s Richmond Chief by iMonroe Chief, dam by 
A. W. Richmond. g 

I. H. Mulholland's br s Ostto by McKinney, dam Twilight by 
Othello. 

Walnut Grove Stock Farm's br m Lottie by San Diego, dam by 
Whippleton. 

J. W. Donathan's b g McBriar by McKinney, dam Briar Belle. 
Geo. A. Kelly's b m Anzella by Antrim, dam Hazel Kirk by Ai- 
wa rd. 

S. H. Hoy's br g McNally by McKinney, dam by Alcazar. 

T. J. Crowley's b s Boydello by Boydell, dam by Durango Chief. 

H. H. Helman'sbg Ned Thorno by •Billy Thornhill, dam Lady 
Nutwood by Nutwood. 

Vendome Stock Farm's bm Nora McKinney by McKinney. dam 
Lady by Dexter Prince. 

2:20 Class Trotting Stakes— 81 OOO. 

H. L. Frank's b s Ben Liobes by McKinney, dam Belle McGregor 
by Robert McGregor. 

James Coffin's br g Puerto Rico by Sable Wilkes, dam Mamie 
Kohl by Steinway. 

Wm. Murray's b m Mary P. by Alexander Button. 

J. H. Kelly's b g Roxe by Conifor, dam by A. W. Richmond. 

Albert Joseph's ch m Floradora by Sable Steinway, dam Pearl 
by Blue Bull. 

A. G. Gurnett's b g Zouibra by McKinney, dam Nellie Fairmont 
by Fairmont. 

Robert Freeman's b g Prince L. by Escort, dam Queen L. 
Ho Yow's b m Solo by McKinney, dam by Stamboul. 

D. F. Oglesby's Almnnada by Eros, dam Maggio E. by Nutwood. 
Vendome Stock Farm's ch hJThomas R. by Iran Alto, dam Yadrcl 

by Nutwood. 

2:35 Class Pacing Stakes— SIOOO. 

W. H. Williams' b ni Julia Shake by Delgoma, dam by Shakes 

pcare. 

H. W. Meek's b g Enoch by Sidmorn, dam Belle by James Lick. 

E. W. Runyon's b m Banker's Daughter by Arthur Wilkes, dam 
Sunliower. 

0. Whitehead'! s g Toppy bv Delphi, dam by Dexter Prince. 
A. H. Cohen's br h Advertisor by Advertiser, dam Alfredetta by 
Steinway. 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm's ch g B. S. Dillon by Sidney Dillon, dam 

Biscara. 

S. K. Trefry's br s Direct C. by Direct, dam Rosie C. 
Wm. G. Layng's b g Sir Albert S. by Diablo, dam Efhc Logan by 
Durfee. 

Wm. Hogoboom's b g Harry J. by Reavis' Steinway, dam by 
Singleton. 

D. F. Oglesby's ch m Nellio I. 

W. S. Maben's b m Redline by Jud, dam by Rcdcloake; b m 
Electra by Silkwood, dam by Woolsey. 

Walnut Grove Stock Farm's br s Arthur B. by Steinway, dam 
Woodflower by Ansel. 

T. J. Crowley's ch g Sandow by Dictatus, dam Etta by Naubuc- 

S. H. Hoy's br m Reta H. by McKinney, dam by Irvington. 

H. II Helman's brs Motanic by Chehalis, dam by Hamboy. 

Vendome Stock Farm's ch m Our Boy's Sister by Baywood, dam 
by Wapsie. 

T. C. Cabney's b g Al Sandy by Wayland W , dam Rapidan by 
Overland. 

2:17 Class Pacing Stakes— SIOOO. 

Chas. W. Farrar's ch g El Diablo by Diablo, dam Elwood by A. 

W. Richmond. 

S. F. Martin's b m Miramoute by Diablo, dam Mountain Maid by 

Cresco. 

M. Hart's b m Hermia by Soudan, dam Hattie by Tom Patchen. 
J. L. Smith's ch s Gaff Topsail by Diablo, dam Belle by Alcona 
H. W Meek's b g Enoch by Sidmore, dam Bolle by James Lick. 

E. W. Runyon's b m Banker's Daughter by Arthur Wilkes, dam 

Sunflower. 

0. Whitehead's s g Toppy by Delphi, dam by Dexter Prince. 
A. H. Cohen's br h Advertisor by Advertiser, dam Alfredetta by 
Steinway. 

S. K. Trefry's blk s Freddie C. by Direct, dam Rosie C. 
Wm. G. Layng's b g Sir Albert S. by Diablo, dam Effle Logan by 
Durfee. 

D. F. Oglesby's ch m Nellie I. 

H. H. Helman's br s Motanic by Chehalis, dam by Hamboy. 
Vendome Stock Farm's ch m Our Boy's Sister by Baywood, dam 
by Wapsie. 

2:13 Class, Pacing— Stakes 81000. 

C. Whitehead's blk s Delphi by Director dam Etta by Dexter 
Prince. 

M. Hart's br m Hermia by Soudan. 
S. F. Martin's blk h Doc Wilkes by Mambrino Wilkes. 
C. W. Farrer's ch g El Diablo by Diablo dam Elwood :by A. W . 
Richmond. 

H H. Dunlap's b g King Cadenza by Steinway dam Empress by 
Flaxtail. 

J. B. Iverson's ch m Dictatress by Dictatus dam Salinas Belle by 
Carr's Vermont. 

S. C. rryon's blk m Margarctta by Direct dam RositaA. by Adrian 
J. D Hein's b s John A. by Wayland W. dam Lady Moor by Grand 
Moor. 

Chas. Cline, of 2430 N. street, Sacramento, has a 
very handsome brown pacing gelding for sale that is 
one of the best mannered road horses in the State. 
This horse worked a mile in 2:21 last week very handily. 
He is perfectly safe for a lady to drive and will bo sold 
cheap. See ad. 



JULY.6, 1901] 



5 



H JOTTINGS. || 



'"THE "GONE WRONG" LIST is growing larger as 
* the regular harness racing seasons here and in the 
East are approaching, and the number of horses that 
will face the starter this year will be but a handful to 
those that are laid up with the ailments to which hoi'se 
flesh is heir. Over East there will be large fields in the 
majority of races, but the fields will be small when 
compared with the original entry lists. The amount 
of hard work that is given the average trotter or pacer 
to get him in condition to go three heats in 2:15 or 
better would put nine out of ten of the best thorough- 
bred ever foaled out of business. For endurance and 
ability to stand up under hard work the trotting bred 
horse of to-day excels every other breed of horses. 
His legs and feet are called upon to stand a strain that 
no other breed of horses can endure, and as year by 
year the speed required to win gets faster and faster, 
the wonder is that so many horses come to the post. 
Great as the strain is on the lungs and heart, bones and 
tendons of the 2:10 harness horse, they could be greatly 
lessened were the training tracks kept in better shape 
for fast work. The track that is kept in good condi- 
tion during the entire training season is not on the map 
as yet, and few there are that are good six days in 
succession. Those that are considered the best, and 
receive the most attention are probably good three or 
four days in each month, but not more. A trainer 
may work his horses on Tuesday on an excellent track' 
the footing moist and firm with a nice cushion on the 
surface. When he goes on the following Friday he 
finds that a couple of days of hot, drying weather and 
a too economical use of the sprinkling wagon has made 
the track cuppy and dangerous to do fast work on, 
But his horse needs the work, he takes a chance, and 
very likely ends his workout with a lame horse that 
has to be blistered or fired and thrown out of training. 
The track manager can hardly be blamed as he is 
doing all he can afford to and is very poorly paid for 
the amount of work he puts on his track. There are 
too many mile tracks in California for the number of 
horses worked. If the trotters and pacers trained 
here annually could be collected on three or four tracks, 
the managers of these tracks could afford to devote 
more time and labor toward keeping them in proper 
shape. Many horses go wrong every year from over- 
work, but the number that suffer from bowed tendons, 
bad feet, splints, curbs, sprains, etc., due to poor tracks 
is large enough to make a respectable^entry list to a 

grand circuit meeting. 

The question of matinee records will probably cut 
quite a figure with owners when they come to make up 
their stallion cards and advertisements for next season. 
If the get of a horse has won a matinee event in fast 
time, the owner of the stallion will be justified in print- 
ing the name of the horse and the time made in the 
list of his stallions standard performers. Of course 
such performances should be labeled "matinee race 
record" sc that the reader will understand that it is 
not registered in the Year Book and the sire will get 
the credit that is due him. Last Saturday Mr. M. M. 
Potter's mara Sweet Marie by McKinney won a race at 
the matinee of the Los Angeles Driving Club, trotting 
both heats in 2:14 flat. I believe she won a heat at a 
previous matinee in 2:13|. At any raoe Mr. Durfee 
will be perfectly justified in placing Sweet Marie among 
the 2:15 performers credited to McKinney and while 
he has always been a stickler for actual race records 
and has refused to place any "against time" or "trials" 
with McKinneys performers, this matinee race at Los 
Angeles is entirely authentic and there is not a par- 
ticle of doubt but Sweet Marie went the two heats in 
the time stated, and gives McKinney his sixteenth 2:15 
performer. 

Payne Shafter writes fromOlema "Would you please 
give in your paper the approved method of bandaging 
horses' legs after a workout or a brush on the road. 
I understand that trainers now wrap cotton batting 
about the leg and then loosely bandage with a roller 
bandage over the cotton — all done to prevent a partial 
stoppage of the circulation." 

In reply to Mr. Shafter I would state that bandaging 
in this manner has got to be the almost universal prac- 
tice with trainers and one seldom sees the old plan 
resorted to of putting on the bandage without the 
cotton underneath. Cotton batting is now prepared 
especially for this purpose and is kept in stock by the 
dealers in horse goods. It secures a gentle, even pres- 
sure on the cords and ligaments, and there is not so 
much danger of stopping the circulation by the band- 
age becoming too tight. Ed Geers, who must be 
recognized as America's leading trainer, says in his 
recent book: 

"In the early part of a horse's work I do not think 
it advisable to bandage much, nor use leg or body 



wash. I do not think it best to rub the horse too 
much; it makes him sore and irritable and causes him 
to lose flesh. When the horse comes in from the work 
throw a light blanket over him and take a damp 
sponge and sponge his legs and rub them with a cloth 
a little, then scrape the sweat out of his hair- 
Straighten his hair with cloths and throw the blanket 
over him again; you will be governed by the weather 
as to the weight of the blanket. Walk him fifteen or 
twenty minutes, then take him in, rub him again very 
lightly with the cloths five or ten minutes, blanket him 
again and walk him twenty-five or thirty minutes, 
then he is ready to do up if the work has not been 
very strong, but if it has it will be necessary to spend 
more time on him. After he has been rubbed out and 
cleaned thoroughly wash his feet and sponge his legs. 
Dry them thoroughly with cloths. As you begin to 
give him strong and fast work it will be advisable to 
use bandages, leg and body wash. A wash I like best 
for this purpose is two parts of witch hazel, one part 
of alcohol and one part of soft water. This should 
be used warm when the horse comes in from his work. 
Spray on the body and muscles, then rub well with 
the hands, lay the cooler or light blanket on him while 
the wash and bandages are being put on his legs, and 
cool him out as before stated. If the horse has had 
fast, hard work or a race, after he is cooled out and 
ready to put away, use a little of the wash on his legs 
and put on the bandage for a couple of hours. It is 
best to put on the bandage very light." 

The Los Angeles Races Will Fill Well. 

The following entries had been received by Secre- 
tary Teed of the Los Angeles Association up to the 
evening of June 2d. As the entries closed on the first, 
several days will be required for all the entries from a 
distance to reach Los Angeles, and quite a number of 
additional entries may be received. The slow classes 
will all fill well. The Directors will meet to-day to act 
upon the entries and decide which purses have filled: 

Trotting Events. 

Free for all trot— G. W. Ford's Neeruut, P. J. Williams' Monterey. 

2:10 trot— G. A. Kelly's Anzella, P. J. Williams' Monterey. 

2:12 trot— T. J. Crowley's Boydello, I. H. Mulholland's Osito, E. 
J. Baldwin's Santa Anita Star, G. W. Ford's Neeruut, Vendome 
Stock Farm's Nora McKinney and Thomas R., W. S. Maben's 
Richmond Chief, J. W. Donathan's McBriar. 

2:14 trot— T. J. Crowley's Boydello, I. H. Mulholland's Osito, E. 
J. Baldwin's Santa Anita Star, George P. McNeil's Dan W-, George 

A. Kelly's Anzello, Vendome Stock Farm's Nora McKinney and 
Thomas R., W. S. Maben's Richmond Chief, C. C. Hickey's Colum- 
bia, Henry Delaney's George W. McKinney, J. W. Donathan's Mc- 
Briar. 

2:15 trot— C. H. Austin's Edison, T. J. Crowley's Boydello, E. J. 
Baldwin's Santa Anita Star, George P. McNeil's Dan W., Vendome 
Stock Farm's Nora McKinney and Thomas R., W. S. Maben's 
Richmond Chief, Henry Delaney's George W. McKinney. 

2:19 trot— J. H. Kelly's Roxie, C. H. Austin's Edison, Robert 
Freeman's Prince L., Vendome Stock Farm's Azalia and Solo, R. 
R. Brown's Fanny Richards, W. S. Maben's Dr. Mac, C. Denison's 
Little Mack, D.;F. Oglesby's Almonda, A. G. Gurnett's What Is It- 

2:23 trot— Albert Joseph's Floradora, I. H. Mulholland's Peter 
Jackson, J. H. Kelly's Roxie, F. Keller's Briar K., Edward Dupuy's 
Rozelle, Robert Freeman's Prince L., Vendome Stock Farm's Solo 
and Azalia, W. S. Maben's Dr. Mac, C. C. Hickey's Columbia, C- 
Denison's Little Mack, D. F. Oglesby's Almonda, A. (J. Gurnett's 
Zombro, R. R. Brown's Fanny Richards. 

Three year old trot— C. A. Owen's Le Roy, George W. Ford's 
Neerillia, W. S. Maben's Italia. 

Paving Events. 

Free for all pace— J. F. Snoover's Floracita. 

2:09 and 2:11 pace— C. H. Whitehead's Delphi, A. L. Conklin's 
Edna R., J. F. Snoover's Floracita. 

2:13 pace— J. H. Thompson's El Diablo, H. H. Dunlap's King 
Cadenza, K. R. Brown's Doc Wilkes, A. L. Conklin's Edda R. 

2:15 pace— C. H. Whitehead's Toppy, H. H. Duulap's King 
Cadenza, J. H. Thompson's El Diablo, R. R. Brown's Doc Wilkes. 

2:17 pace— R. W. Reardon's Maud R., R. R. Brown's Miramonte 1 
W. G. Layng's Sir Albert S., Ed Graser's Nellie I., John Donahue's 

, W. S. Maben's Redliue, Vendome Stock Farm's Our Boy's 

Sister and Santa Cruz, E. W- Runyou's Banker's Daughter, H. B- 
Steven's Maud Wilkes, J. H. Thompson's El Diablo, W. L. Willis' 
Coeur de Lion, C. H. Whitehead's Toppy. 

►32:20 pace— C. H. Whitehead's Toppy, W. G. Layng's Sir Alber 1 
S., R. R. Browne's Miramonte, P. W. Reardon's Maud R., George 
P. McNeil's El Rayo, G. T Bush's Bendiua, W. I). Mesarvey's 
Altawood, J. B. Loving's Charter Oaks Wilkes, W L. Willis' Coeur 
de Lion, F. A. Ramsey's Lady Mitford, J. W. Johnson's Celmar, H. 

B. Steven's Maud Wilkes, E. W. Runyou's Banker's Daughter, 
Vendome Stock Farm's Our Boy's Sister and Santa Cruz, W. S. 

Maben's Redline, C. C. Hickey's Alfred O, John Donahue's 

Ed Graser's Nellie I. 

Three year old pace— William Baker's Ferudale, W. L.Willis' 
Coeur de Lion. 

Nominations were received for the S: 80 trotting and 2:25 pacing 
events as follows, horses to be named September 1st: 

2:30 Trot— A. G. Gurnett, Albert Joseph, George P. McNeil, I. H. 
Mulholland, F. Keller, Edward Dupuy, C. H. Austin, Vendome 
Stock farm, W. S. Maben, C. Dcnison. 

2:25 Pace— George P. McNeil, William Baker, O. T. Hush, .1. II, 
Loving, H. H. Spears (2), F. A. Ramsey, E. B. Stevens, Vendome 
Stock farm. W. S. Maben, J. W. Johnson, C. C. Hickey. John Dona 
hue, J. B. Smith, C. T. Thayer, H. B. Uutterflold. 

Walter Maben of Los Angoles, C. F. Bunch of San 
Jose, C. A. Spencer of Walnut Grove, and Henry 
Helman of San Jose will all go to Sacramento within a 
few days with their horses which are entered at tho 
Breeders meeting. 

John A. McKerron's record is again 2:10. The 
Board of Review of the National Trotting Association 
re-reversed itself last week. 



Golden Gate Park Driving Club Races. 

Five or six thousand people were at the California 
Jockey Club's track on tho Fourth of July, attracted 
by a good program of races announced by tho Golden 
Gate Park Driving Club and a free gate. Two books 
handled the money that was risked on the events and 
at times were very busy. Better weather could not 
have boon made to order and the sport was very fair. 

Threo heats were paced inside of 2:20 d uriag tho 
day. Fred W. Thompson, J. C. Ohlandt and E. 
Stewart acted as judges, J. G. Chesley and Fred Vetter 
held the watches, R. D. Ledgett officiated as starter 
with J. C. Dinue as assistant, and Dr. Dalziol was Mar- 
shal. The starting was very good, better, barring one 
or two incidents of long scoring, than is usually seen 
at club races. 

The first race took four heats to decide and was well 
contosted throughout finally going to Harry Slocum's 
mare Tempest that trotted well after she got steady. 

.1. Doran's pacing gelding Tirado, a Palo Alto bred 
horse, walked off with the second race in straight 
heats and got into the list in the second heat. 

The third race went to Sable Le Grande, also in 
straight heats. Al Gregor was the contesting horse 
each time and tho judges thought the Steinway geld- 
ing was getting such a poor drive that they declared 
the second heat no race and asked James Chesley to 
drive the horse, but Sable Le Grande was the bettor 
pacer and won handily. 

F. Gommet's pacor Lafayette captured the fourth 
race easily, well driven by M. M. Donnelly. Tho first 
heat was in 2:24}, thus giving the horse a standard 
record. Lafayette was bred at Palo Alto. 

The fifth race was called a match probably because 
there but two starters. It was really a purse race, $75 
being hung up by the club. L. Richardson's entry 
the Sidney mare Edna R., was the favorite and won 
handily over King Cadenza. 1 Edna R. was sent out 
for the first, heat and the driver of the King let her go 
and only dropped inside the distance. The next heat 
King Cadenza was sent after her but Edna R. had too 
much speed and beat him out handily. The time 2:10} 
and 2:102, was good for the track. 

Sandow, a son of Dictatus, won the last race of the 
day but the Eros stallion Eden Vale won the second 
heat in 2:18|, the fastest heat of the race. The sum- 
maries follow: 

First Race— Purse $150. 

Tempest, br m by Richards' Elector (t) (Patrick) 2 3 11 

Pious, ch g (p) (Leiginger) 5 12 2 

Joe Bonney, b g (p) (J. O'Kane) 15 3 3 

Time— 2:32%, 2:30^, 2:28^,2:29. 

Mr. Schwartz's Belle, Mr. Leauer's Lieut. Hobson also started- 

Second Race— Purse $150. 

Tirado, b g by Azmoor (p) (Doran) 1 1 

Time— 2:56!i, 2:25. 

Mr. Sweet's Steve S., Dr. Daziel's Menlo B., Mr. Park's Imp, 
Mr. Eva's Ethel H. and Mr. Patrick's Denny Healy also started. 

Third Race— Purse $150. 

Sable Le Grande, b g by Sable Wilkes (Misner) 1 1 

Time-2:22'/ 2 , 2:23. 

Mr. Roberts' Algregor and Mr. Van Keuren's Mattie B. also 
started. 

Fourth Race— Purse $150. 

Lafayette, bg (p) by Liberty Sontag (Donnelly) 1 

Time— 2:24Ji, 2:26}$. 

Mr. Misner's Lady Rowena, Dr. McLaughlin's A. B. P., and Mr. 
Croner's Bondy C. also started. 

Fifth Race— Purse $75. 

Kdna R , b m by Sidney (Richardson) I 1 

King Cadenza (Dunlap) 2 2 

Time— 2:16M, 2:16%. 
Sixth Race— Purse $150. 

Sandow, ch g by Dictatus (J. O'Kane) 1 2 1 

Eden Vale, br s (p) by Eros (Jacobs) 2 1 2 

Time— 2:20%, 2:18%, 2:20'/ 2 . 
Mr. Cuicello's Puerto Rico, Mr. Curley's Prince 0., and Mr. Pi-en- 

dergast's BolHvar also started, 



Racing at Marysville. 



About ono hundred persons assomblod at the Marys- 
ville race track on Thursday afternoon of last wook to 
witness the race between Peter Kerrigan's Freda S. 
and Louis Padolla's Hazel B., best two in throe heats. 
W. P. Harkoy acted as judge and E. P. McDaniol, 
Will McCune and William Looch as timokeepors. 

Tho first heat was won by Freda S., drivon by Hogo- 
boom, in 2:25; the second heat boing taken >by her 
also, Hazel B. acting vory badly. 

Freda S. is a very handsome blood bay, four years 
old, sired by Hogoboom's Lynmont, dam Klmorono, 
and for this race was taken right out of a buggy with" 
out any preparatory work. The judges wore of the 
opinion that sho could have gone a mile in 2:22 if 
Hogoboom had pushed her 

The trotting was followed by a fivo-oighths running 
dash, in which Sunshine defeated Nomadic in 1:05}. — 
Marysville Appeal. 

Mr. W. A. Sayro, of 1017 Eighth street, Sacramonto, 
is one of the regular drivers on tho famous Riverside 
road of that city, and pilots a live year old mare that 
is a regular whirlwind for speed as tho other drivers 
lind out whenever tho well known harness doalor gives 
the mare her head. 







f July 0, 1901 




It looks as though the Memphis meeting would be a 
howling success. 

Zombro has been bred to forty mares sinco arriving 
at Salem, Oregon. 

Friday, September 6th will be Drummers day at the 
California State Pair. 



The fastest mile worked at the Glenvillo track this 
/ear is Rey Direct 's 2:10. 

The Grand Circuit will open at Detroit one week 
from Monday next, July 15th. 

Stamboulotte's mile in 2:11 J is the fastest mile trotted 
in a race this year up to date. 

Quite a number of California horses will start at the 
Windsor meeting which opons July 8th. 

Allie Trout is working fourteen yearlings by Baron 
Wilkes and there is not a pacer among them. 

Ed Goers will have but live horses in his campaign- 
ing stable this year, but they will be a hot lot. 

Sunol has been bred to The Earl (3) 2:1", son of 
Mambrino King and Princess Royal 2:20 by Chimes. 

Two harness races and four or more running events 
will bo on the program for each day of the State Fair 

this year. 

They say that Lord Derby attracts more attention 
at thoCleveland track than any horse in training there, 
not barring The AbboV 

The State Fair Directors met last Saturday. The 
speod committee will have the harness purses ready to 
advertise in our next issue. 

Walter Palmer has sent his famous pacer Little Boy 
2:061 to Joliet, where he will be given his final prepara- 
tion before starting on his campaign. 

Attorney-General Knox has taken his team of fast 
trotters, Wort and Dr. Leek, to Washington City, and 
will soon take other good ones to the capital. 

Payne J. Shafter of Oloma claims the name of 
"Stampedo" for his bay filly, four years old by Nassar 
dam Pastime, the dam of Secret 2:2GA by Rustic. 



Mr. M. M. Potter of Los Angeles now holds both 
trotting and pacing amateur records of this Coast with 
his two mares Primrose 2:10, pacing, and Sweet Marie 
2:14, trotting. 

The State Ag:icultural Society will offer purses this 
year for horses owned by members of the driving clubs. 
Some good contests should result as there will be great 
rivalry to win. 

From the beginning of the Boer war to May 21st 
last tho British government landed in Africa 172,985 
horses and 80,723 mules, or a total of 253,708. A count 
on May 11th last showed a total in active service with 
the army of 185,000, a loss of 68,708 during the winter. 



1'. H. Grimes, of Chicago, purchased Little Thorne 
2:07 for the express purpose of defeating Hontas 
( 'rooke 2:09 at the Chicago matinees. Hontas Crooko 
is owned by Mr. C. K. Billings and his stable of mati- 
nee trotters and pacers has been invincible around 
Chicago. 

Reports comes from Oregon that Mr. Albert Pratt's 
pacer Scappose 2:10}, is about the best side wheeler in 
the north. She was sired by Roy Wilkes 2:0(U, dam 
Maggie by Princeton. She shows such improvement 
this year that a mark below 2:10 is considered to be 
within her reach. 



Grooms who have watched Anaconda 2:021 in tho 
hands of other trainers in years past say that tho 
horse bettor in trainer John Trout's hands than ever 
before. Trout let him step tho last half of a workout 
mile last week in just ono minute, tho third quarter in 
twenty-nine seconds. 



James Gatcomb has been slow with Boralma this 
.spring, but the way he reeled off an eighth in 15 sec- 
onds a few mornings since, shows he is a much im- 
proved horse over last year. He is going straight and 
strong, having fully recovered from his ailment of last 
season in his hind leg. 



Captain Tough, the old time Kausas horseman, who 
sold Smuggler 2:15', to Col. H. S. Russell, Boston, has 
bought of tho Union Pacific Railroad Company a ranch 
of nineteen thousand acres in Gove county, Kansas. 
It is said that ho intends to make it the biggest and 
best appointed horse breeding ranch in the United 
States. 

It is tho opinion of folm Kelly that Charley Herr is 
better right now than ever ho was in his life, and this 
opinion is entitled to weight, for Kelly is not only an 
accomplished reinsman, but knows the son of Alfred 
G. through and through. Charley Herr is looking all 
right, is doing all right, and with no mishap he will 
get there all right, all right. 

Mr. L. E Clawson, the well-known tile manufacturer 
of this city and owner of that good mare Phoebe 
Childers 2:i0}, left on Wednesday for Detroit, where 
he will witness the opening of the Grand Circuit races, 
and will go on down the line to Buffalo and other 
places. Mr. Clawson will see his handsome mare start 
for some of the big purses on the circuit and we hope 
he will have the pleasure of seeing her como to the 
wire first on more than one occasion. 



Tom Ryder 2:131 was sold at auction at Honolulu 
two weeks ago for $200. 

P. W. Hodges will probably bring his string of 
horses to the Alameda track to train. 

Margaret ta 2:15 by Direct will bo raced again this 
year. She is now in Vet Tryon's string at Sacramento. 

Win. Hogoboom took a half dozen horses to the 
Yreka meeting which took place on the Fourth of .1 lily. 

Great racing is expected at the Spokane meeting 
which will open September 10th. Entries close July 
25th. 

Charley Hayt 2:07| continues to go sound under stiff 
work at Syracuse, and Snow now thinks he will race 
all right. 

Races were held on the Fourth of July at Yreka, 
Rocklin, Oakland, Santa Barbara and several other 
localities in this State. 

Geo. Beckers writes from Salem, Oregon, that good 
grooms are scarce at that point and that a half dozen 
at least could get work there. 



Phoebe Childers 2:10A is entered in the 2:11 trot at 
Memphis. Dolly Dillon, Venus II, and Stamboulette 
are entered in the same race. 



Stamboulette trotted a heat in 2:11:} Saturday, June 
22d, and was beaten in 2:30 the following Saturday. 
He must have been sadly out of condition. 



The gato receipts on Kamehameha Day at the Hon- 
olulu Jockey Club meeting were $1374, which would be 
considered a pretty fair gate at any California meeting. 



Don't forget the sale of trotters and pacors from the 
Oakwood Park Stock Farm, which will bo held at the 
Occidental Horse Exchange, in this city, next Friday. 

Stam B. 2:11), has been bred to about forty well 
bred mares this year. No horse in the country has a 
better looking lot of foals than the youngsters by him 
dropped this year. 

There are three California horses named in the 2:20 
trot at Memphis. They are A. L. Mulcahey's Algo- 
netta, B. O. Van Bokkelen's Vic Shellar, and A. W. 
Bruner's Harry Madison. 

The official score card issued by the Golden Gato 
Park Driving Association for its meeting on the Fourth 
of July, is the neatost score card that has been gotten 
out in this city for years. 

There are several elegantly bred young mares cata- 
logued in the Oakwood Park sale which will be held 
July 11th. They are by Chas. Derby, El Benton, 
Stoinway and Prince Red. 

We acknowledge receipt of a complimentary ticket 
to the eight annual Spokane Interstate Fair. Ten 
thousand dollars in purses will bt. given at this meet- 
ing and it gives promise of being the best ever given 
in the Northwest. 

Tom Smith, the bay colt by McKinney, owned by 
Prof. E. P. Heald, president of the Pacific Coast Trot- 
ting Horse Breeders' Association, won second monoy 
in his only start at Denver. This colt is well entered 
over tho East and will make a good showing unless 
some accident happens him. 

Mr. Frank Falkerton, a popular citizen of Salom, 
Oregon, has bred his mare Cora to Zombro 2:11. Cora 
is by Scarlet Lotter, he by Red Wilkes. Her dam is 
Canemah 2:18i{, bv Altamont, and her second dam 
Ophelia Chiles (dam of Wallula 2:2i)| by Almont 33. 
Cora is a very handsomo mare and considered one of 
the most promising broodmares in the northern 
country. 

Dr. Kane, president of the Gentlemen's Driving and 
Field Club of Monmouth county, New York, has prac- 
tically closed negotiations with George Ketcham for an 
exhibition mile to speed wagon by the great Crosceus, 
the king of trotting stallions, at Elkwood Park, before 
his race with The Abbot. On the same day, Joe 
Patchen, Searchlight, Anaconda and possibly Connor 
and Dariel will be driven to wagon to try for a world's 
record. 



A recent letter to the B. and S. from A. G. F. Stice 
who campaigned a string of horses on the California 
circuit last year, states that he has the fast and game 
trotter Sir Charles 2:10}, and several other good ones 
in his string at Monmouth, 111. His maro Wayside 
2:21 foaled on June 9th a black (illy by Direct 2:05.\, and 
Jessie C. 2:101 and several more of his mares were ex- 
pected to foal in a few days to the same horse. Mr. 
Stice added "You can say to the boys that I may bring 
these youngsters by Direct out to California to train 
some time in tho future. My filly Nellie Colbert, one 
year old, by Colbert 2:07A, dam Nellie M. 2:10), is very 
fine and I think will do "to go down the big ring when 
older." 

A most interesting decision has lately been handed 
down by the Appellate Court of Indiana. A suit for 
damages was instituted against the Rush County Ag- 
ricultural Society and the result of the trial in the 
lower court not suiting tho defendants, an appeal was 
taken. The decision reads thus, tho language thor- 
oughly explaining the circumstances of the case: 
"Where a fair association had a race track where 
horses could run without injury to spectators occupy- 
ing seats provided for thorn, and the association negli- 
gently made an opening in the fence surrounding tho 
track, through which opening a horse came from the 
track and among the poople assembled from the main 
part of the fair grounds, injuring a person, we hold 
that the fair association is liable for the injury." The 
opening in question was the drawgate, which had not 
been closed as it should have been, and this appar- 
ently the court holds to be negligence. Fair managers 
will do well to take note. 



I. Mulholland is working Osito 2:13} at Sacramento 
and has him in good condition. Tho 2:14 trot in which 
ho is entered at the Breeders will have a good list of 
starters. 

Hi Hogoboom's trotter by Waldstein, out of a Clay 
Duke mare, is showing pretty well at tho Sacramento 
track. As will be soon by reference to our front page 
ho has his share of good looks. 

The Roman 2:18} is entered in the 2:14 trot at Mem- 
phis. Will Durfee names Dr. Book 2:13}, C. L. Griffith 
names Rect 2:10}, and A. W. Rruner names Our 
Lucky 2:13) in this same class. 

The California horses will very likely suffer a great 
deal from the hot spell which has been on during the 
past few days in the East, and it may prevent them 
being started at Windsor and Detroit. 

Harry Hurst, the chestnut gelding that John Saw- 
yer took to Oregon with him, is owned by J. F. Suther- 
land and was sired by Delwin, the famous broken 
legged horse that Sam Gamble formerly owned. 

Oro Guy, tho three-year-old colt by Oro Wilkes out 
of the Guy Wilkes niare Roseate, owned by Robert 
Orr of Hollister, worked a milo in 2:20 over the San 
Jose track ono day last week. He is such a big fellow 
that he will not be raced this year, although he may 
be started in the Stanford Stake at the State Fair. 

George H. Ketcham has made a proposition to the 
Mayor of Toledo to let Cresceus trot for charity in 
that city sometime this fall. Ho proposes to give an 
exhibition with the horse, admission charge to be 25 
cents, and the proceeds to be donated to charitable 
institutions of Lucas county, irrespective of denomi- 
nation. 

One of tho best looking horses at the Sacramento 
track is a four year old bay colt by Bay Bird, dam by 
Imperious, son of Director, second dam by Electioneer, 
third dam thoroughbred. He is a trotter and has an 
almost perfect way of going. This colt is owned by 
the Rancho del Paso and is in Vet Tryon's string at 
Sacramento. 



King Chimes is to be raced this year as a trotter. 
When he took his record of 2:10} at the Empire City 
track he was carrying thirty-eight ounces in front, but 
is now going very smooth in R. L. Davis' hands with 
but fourteen ounces. In the workout at Mineola on 
Saturday ho covered a mile in 2:15, and he is expected 
to materially lower his record this season. 



"I never fed a horse over nine quarts of oats a day 
in my life, and the majority only six, " said William 
Shinners, the veteran, who brought out 3illy S. 2:14}, 
Cracksman 2:13], Mascot 2:04 and others, to one of the 
Buffalo (niters upon turf topics. "It is all foolishness 
to stuff a campaigner with oats, oats, oats all the time. 
Give him plenty of hay and some grass and he'll not be 
looking as thin as a railbird and sick half the season." 

Here is an item for lax trainers and negligent grooms, 
to wit: "Scratches are caused by poor blood and dirt, 
a combination that should not be found existing in 
well regulated stables; but there may be found many 
cases of scratches every season. Mild cases can be 
cured Dy keeping the legs clean and dry and by apply- 
ing oxide of zinc ointment. Severe cases should be 
treated for some time with flaxseed poultices, and after 
tho fever has subdued the ointment mentioned in pre- 
ceding cases may be used." 



Four horse owners of Davisville, Yolo county, have 
put up $100 each as a stake to trot their colts for this 
fall and have asked the Woodland association to add a 
sum to the stake and grivo the race a place on the fail- 
program this year. The names of the gentlemen who 
have put up the money are Elmo Montgomery, Carey 
Montgomery, John Johnson and Samuel Lillard. The 
Woodland association will doubtless offer a good prize 
for this race, and is will certainly be one of the big 
drawing cards of tho meeting. 



David Cahill said yesterday he would ship Charley 
Herr 2:07, Willie Herr (3) and Sister Agathena (3) to 
Detroit about July 8th, and that John Kelly would 
drive Charley Herr in all his races this season, as he 
did last year. This announcement will relieve the 
curiosity of a lot of people who have been putting in a 
good deal of their time this spring guessing what dis- 
position Uncle Davy would make of his famous stallion. 
Xow that it is positively known that John Kelly is to 
pilot the son of Alfred G. in his contests the curious 
will breathe freer, for they feel that in the hands of 
this accomplished reinsman tho " bulldog " trotter will 
fully sustain his reputation as a great and honest race 
horse. If the free-for-all trot at Detroit fills, the pub- 
lic may put Charley Herr down as a sure starter. — 
Kentucky Stock Farm, June 27. 



Says the New York Trotter and Pacer: "An epidemic 
is raging among the horses in this city that has already 
entailed wide-spread disaster, and that threatens to 
produce still more serious consequences. The disease 
was first manifested on Saturday, the 15th inst., and 
it is said that within a week ten thousand horses had 
succumbod to it. The veterinary surgeons have so far 
been unable to determine tho cause and nature of the 
disease, which afflicts all sorts of horses, from high 
bred roadsters and coachers to truck and cart horses. 
The symptoms aro high fever, cough, loss of appetite 
and general weakness, generally resulting in complete 
collapse. The best authorities agree that the unusual 
weather for the past throe months is responsible for 
the disease than anything else. The excessive rainfall 
in April and May and the cool, even chilly, days of 
June, have created conditions favorable for the epi- 
demic, which, for want of a better name, the veterin- 
aries call 'laryngeal influenza.' Although there have 
been no deaths as yet, the authorities declare it to be 
tho most serious outbreak of disease since 1874, when 
the epizootic decimated the horse ranks by the 
thousand." 



JULY-O, 1901] 



$ THE SADDLE. $ 

Hawaiian Jockey Club Races. 

Following are summaries of the races held at Kapio- 
lani Park, Honolulu, June 11th, 13th and 15th, 1901: 

FIRST DAY— JUNE 11. 

Union Peed Company'sCup, half-mile dash, free for all, purse $100 

Molly Connors, 106 lbs ' (Ross) 1 

Racery, 111) lbs ,\ ( , Le ° n , a £ d ! 'i 

Vioris, 119 lbs (McAuliffe) 3 

Gaiety Girl, 1 111 lbs • • • (Kaena) -1 

Venus, 119 lbs (Thomas) Left 

Amethyst 119 lbs (Rodrigues) Left. 

Time 0:51. Bad start. Won easily by two lengths. Winner, G 
S. McKenzie's ch f, 3, by imp. Friar Tuck-Clara L. 

Five furlong dash. Hawaiian bred, purse $100. 

Amarino, 121 lbs (Thomas) 1 

Defender, 124 lbs (Rodrigues) 2 

Lady Amanda, 119 lbs (Leonard) 8 

Eileen, 100 lbs (Murray) -I 

Time 1:06 3-5. Poor start. Won easily by two lengths. Winner' 
R, Ballentine's b g, aged, by Kealia-Amandine. 

Waikapu Cup, six furlongs dash, free for all, purse $150; winner 
of cup to beat Venus' record of 1:16. 

Garterline, 119 lbs (Opiopio) 1 

Amaranth, 119 lbs (Ross) 2 

Watossa, 121 lbs (Thomas) 3 

Time 1:17. Good start. Won driving by half a length. Winner, 
W. H. Cornwell's b m, aged, by imp. Golden Garter-Laline. 

Pacific Mail Steamship Company'sCup, one mile dash, Hawaiian 
bred, purse $150. 

Amarino, 123 lbs (Thomas) 1 

Gaiety Girl, 121 lbs (Kaena) 2 

Time 1:4914. Good start. Won easily by five. lengths. Winner, 
R. Ballentine's b m, aged, by Kealia-Amandine. 

Four and one-half furlong dash, free for all, purse $100 

Racery, 119 lbs (Leonard) 1 

Morrell's Faust, 121 lbs (Piggott) 2 

Virgie A., 119 lbs (Thomas) Disci 

Garterline, 119 lbs (Opiopio) Fell 

Time 0:56% Poor start. Virgie A. won but was disqualified for 
fouling. Winner, Tom Hollinger's b m, 5, by Racine-Pottery. 

Rosita Challenge Cup, one mile free for all; purse $200; $50 added 
if Vioris' record of 1:45 be beaten. 

Weller, 126 lbs (McAuliffe) 1 

Billy McCluskey, 126 lbs (Burns) 2 

Aggravation, 121 lbs (Leonard) 3 

Amaranth, 121 lbs (Ross) 4 

Time 1:45 4-5. Good start. Won easily by live lengths. Weller 
ran a mile in l:42'i in a false break-away. Winner, Prince David's 
c h 5, by Knight of Ellerslee-Lizzie Pickwick. 

Three-eighths mile dash, free for all; purse $75. 

Molly Connors, 106 lbs (Piggott) 1 

Venus, 119 lbs (Leonard) 2 

Abbey, 121 lbs (Ross) 3 

Gaiety Girl, 119 lbs (Kaena) 4 

Time 0:3714- Fair start. Won leasily by two lengths. Winner, 
G. S. McKenzie's c f 3, by imp. Friar Tuck-Clara L. 

HARNESS RACES. 

2:40 class, trotting and pacing, best two heats in three, sweep- 
stake, club adds $100. 

Nettie H (McManus) 1 1 

Artie W (L. Dee) 2 2 

EdnaG (W.Lucas) 3 3 

Time 2:33|/ 2 , 2:26. Both heats won easily. Winner, Honolulu 
Stockyards Stables' b m aged, pedigree unknown. 

California Feed Company Cup, trotting and pacing, Hawaiian 
bred, free for all; purse $150, to be won twice by same stable; best 
two in three. 

Edith R (Judd) 1 1 

Harry B (Garrison) 2 2 

Leahi (Callahan) d 

Time 2:38, 2:41. Both heats won easily. Winner, T. V. King's 
b m aged, by McGinty. 

Rainier Cup, trotting and pacing, free for all, best two heats in 
three; purse $200, to be won twice by same stable. 

Waldo J (Quinn) 1 1 

Wait-a-Little (McManus} 

Time 2:33, 2:13. Winner, J C. Quinn's stables' g. g. aged, by Bob 
Mason. 

2:24 class, trotting and pacing, best two heats in three; purse 
$150. 

Way boy (Judd) 1 1 

Sambo (Quinn) 2 2 

Los Angeles (Callahan) 3 3 

Time 2:21>4, 2:18'4. Winner J. C Quinn's stables' s g aged, by 
Strathway. 

SECOND DAY. 

Half-mile dash, Hawaiian bred, purse $100. 

Amethyst, 119 lbs (Ross) 1 

Gaiety Girl, 119 lbs (Piggott) 2 

Albert H , 124 lbs (Thomas) 3 

Time 0:51. Bad start. Winner trained by Sylva. Won easily 
by five length Winner, Kealia Ranch's b m, aged, by Kealia- 
Amandine. 

Five furlong dash, free for all, purse $100. 

Venus 119 lbs (Ross) 1 

Garterline, 119 lbs (McAuliffe) 2 

Virgie A., 119 lbs (Piggott) 3 

Racery, 119 lbs (Leonard) 4 

Watossa, 121 lbs (Thomas) 5 

Gaiety Girl, 119 lbs (Kaena) 6 

Winner trained by Callahan. 

Timel:02?i. Good start. Won easily by three lengths, second 
and third driving Winner, W. Lucas' b m, aged, by Verona- 
Bellinda 

One mile dash, free for all, purse $150. 

General Cronje, 119 lbs (Piggott) i 

Aggravation, 123 lbs (Leonard) g 

Winner trained by Burns. 

Time 1:45 4-5. Start fair. Won easily by two lengths. Winner, 
G. S. McKenzie's b g, aged, by imp. Martenhurst-Sougstress 

Criterion Cup, one and one-half miles dash, free for all, purse 
$200, to be won twice by the same stable. 

Weller. 127 lbs (McAuliffe) 1 

Hilly McCloskey, 127 lbs (Piggott) 2 

Lady Amanda, 122 lbs (Ross) 3 

Winner trained by McAuliffe. 

Time 2:39. Good start. Won easily with his mouth open by five 
lengths. Winner, Prince David's ch h, 5, by Knight of Ellerslee- 
Lizzie Pickwick. 

HARNESS RACES. 

Merchants purse, 3:00 class, trotting and pacing, best two heats 
in three, purse $150, sweepstake, club adds $100. 

EdnaG (Davis) 1 1 

Artie W (Dee) 2 2 

Nettie H (McManus) 3 3 

Winner trained by Callahan. 

Time— 2;25, 2:25H- Winner W. Lucas' b m. aged, by Cal. Nutwood. 
Gentlemen's driving race, one mile heat, free for all, amateur 



drivers, open to members of the Hawaiian Jockey Club; cup 
value $50. 

Wait-a-little (Holt) 1 

Walter P (Vida) 2 

W. W. Wood (Prince David) 3 

Lustre (Hogan) 4 

Los Angeles (Drummond) d 

Winner trained by McManus. 

Time 2:24 Good start. Won easily. Winner, Chris, J. Holt's br. 
g, aged, pedigree unknown. 

THIRD DAY. 

One and one-sixteenth miles hurdle race, free for all, four hur- 
dles, purse $100. 

Watossa. 160 lbs (McAuliffe) 1 

Dixie Land, 181 lbs (Burns) 2 

Morrell's Faust 160 lbs (Piggott) 3 

Time, 2:01%. Good start. Won pulled up by three lengths. 
Winner, George Thomas' c. g. aged, by imp. Watercress-Atossa. 

Six furlongs dash, free for all. purse $100. 

Virgie A., 119 lbs (Thomas) 1 

Racery. 119 lbs (Leonard) 2 

Garterline, 119 lbs (Opiopio) 3 

Molly Connors, 106 lbs fRoss) 4 

Time, l:16'/ 2 . Good start. Won by half a length, first three driv- 
ing. Winner, Fred. Smith's b. m. aged, by True Briton-Big Bertha. 

One mile dash, Hawaiian bred, purse $150. 

Amarino, 123 lbs (Thomas) 1 

Amaranth. 120 lbs (McAuliffe) 2 

Gaiety Girl, 121 lbs (Kaena) 3 

Time, 1:47. Good start, except Gaiety Girl. Won di-iving by 
half a length Winner, R. Ballentyne's b. g. aged, by Kealia- 
Amandine. 

Jockey Club Cup, one and one-quarter miles handicap, free for 
all, purse $200. 

Weller, 129 lbs . . .(McAuliffe) 1 

Billy McCloskey, 115 lbs (Piggott) 2 

Lady Amanda, 85 lbs (Nagasaki) 3 

Time, 2:1114- Good start. Won easily by three lengths. Win- 
ner, Prince David's c. h. 5 years, by Knight of Ellerslee-Lizzie 
Pickwick. 

Pony race, one-half mile dash, fourteen hands or under; purse $75; 
catch weights. 

Eileen (Nagasaki) 1 

Minnie (Opiopio) 2 

Mady M (Pilikia Mahope) 3 

Hakulani (Thomas) 

Lokilaulii (Colbourn) 

Pepper (Ross) 

Time 0:521j. Start fair. Won in a canter by three lengths. 
Winner W. W. Wolters' c f 3, by Lord Brock-Katie. 

Consolation race, one mile, for non-winners at this meet; purse 
$100. Weights for age. 

Aggravation, 121 lbs (McAuliffe) 1 

Billy McCloskey, 126 lbs (Piggott) 2 

Gaiety Girl, 121 lbs (Thomas) 3 

Time 1:47. Start fair. Won driving by half a length. Winner 
Thomas Hollinger's b m aged, by imp. Brutus-Gladdett. 

2:14 class, trotting and pacing, best three heats in five; purse $200 

Wayboy (Quinn) 1 1 1 

Tom Ryder (Judd) 2 2 2 

Mosquito (McManus) 3 3 3 

Winner trained by George Graham. 

Time 2:22, 2:21>4, 2:23. Each heat won easily. Winner J. C. 
Quinn's stables' c g aged, by Strathway. 

The Hawaiian Gazette, commenting on the meeting 
says: 

"The meeting just closed has been the best on record 
and the racing as a whole has been of good class 

Prince David, thanks to Weller, heads the list of 
winning owners. J. C. Quinn comes next, and R. 
Ballentine, another one horse man, takes third place. 
G. S. McKenzie, who brought a string of five runners 
from Hilo, has had only a fair share of success, win- 
ning three races and figuring fourth on the win- 
ning list. 

Tom Hollinger has not done as well as was expected, 
but Racery should win purses for him next year. Col. 
Spaulding's string has only one race to its credit. The 
Kealia horses made an uncommonly good showing, 
however, and the thanks of Honolulu sportsmen are 
extended both to Colonel Spaulding and G. S. Mc- 
Kenzie for their efforts to make the seventeenth meet- 
ing of the Hawaiian Jockey Club an unprecedented 
success. 

James McAuliffe easily heads the list of winning 
jockeys, with the excellent per centage of 62.5. Thoma 8 
comes next with four wins to his credit and a percent- 
age of 40. Both Ross and Piggott have displayed good 
riding form at the meeting. Cal. Leonard has ridden 
in several races, but his skill in the saddle was dis- 
counted by his mounts. This remark applies in even 
a greater degree to Kaena. 

J. C. Quinn drove to a winning in each of the three 
races, and proved himself to be the most capable 
reinsman here. He brought Waldo J. to tho wire in 
such shape that he could have rounded the track in 
2:10: as it was, he cut a fraction of a second off the 
track record of 2:13 2:5, held by Loupe. Wayboy, 
Quinn's other winner, is a game, consistent little horse 
which will pace below 2:20. 

C. H. Judd and McManus shared the remaining 
horses in the harness division between them. 

The meeting has been productive of track records 
in the free for all harness race, the four and one-half 
furlongs dash, the one mile and a quarter, and the one 
mile and a half races. Also, Edith R. broke the Ha- 
waiian-bred trotting record of 2:42i, held for many 
years by Fred Mac. 

The local horsemen are now looking towards Hilo, 
and quite a number of racers will beshipped from here 
to the half-mile track at Honolulu Park. Among 
those certain to go are Weller, Amarino, Watossa, 
Venus, Garterline and Minnie. 

The Hilo executive are making liberal offers 
purses, and with the track in good shape and plenty 
of horses in sight, the Hilo July meeting should prove 
a big success. 



Results at Butte. 



J uno 29. The Montana Jockey Club mooting opened 
hero to-day with fine woather and a good attendance. 
The track was not fast, nor was the betting heavy. 
Results: 

2:35 trot — Mount Hood won in two straight heats, 
Erudition second, Savoring third. Time 2:26$, 2:24J. 

Four furlongs— Huachuca won, Irma A. second' 
E. M. Brattan third. Time 0:49|. 

Five and a half furlongs— Doublet won, Decapo 
second, Valencienno third. Time 1:08:}. 

One mile, preliminary derby handicap— Jim Hale 
won, Ada N. second, Quibo third. Time 1:44'}. 

Mile and fifty yards— Spike won, Gauntlet second, 
Rio Chico third. Time 1:46. 

Six and a half furlongs— Kitty Kelly won, Julietta B. 
second, Burdock third. Time 1:23£ 

July 1. Weather fine, track good. Summary: 

2:27 pace — Christobel won in two straight heats, 
Hassolo second, Heppie third. Time 2:20, 2:20\. 

Four and a half furlongs— Winnecock won, Pirate 
Maid second, Tufts third. Time 0:56. 

Seven furlongs— 'Ostler Joe won, Burdock second, 
Monda third. Time 1:30. 

One and one sixteenth miles — Sylvan Lass won, 
Gauntlet second, Ranier third. Time 1:50}. 

Six furlongs — Mountain Queen won, Jim Hale sec- 
ond, Pope Leo third. Time 1:15. 

Three and a half furlongs^-Charley Lamar won, 
Auriffera second, Abba L. third. Time 0:41. 

There was no attempt on the part of the police to 
interfere with the betting. 

July 2. Only one favorite won in to-day's races and 
that was in the first event. Weather warm; track 
fast. Summary: 

Trotting and pacing — On Trial won in straight heats, 
Bird second, Billings third. Best time 2:26 j. 

Six furlongs — Sam Green won, Joe K. second, Jean 
Spencer third. Time 1:18. 

One mile — Frank Duffy won, Ping second, Guilder 
third. Time 1:43J. 

Five furlongs— Heigh Ho won, Sir Dougal second, 
Kitty Kelly third. Time 1:04}. 

Four furlongs — Walter Scratch won, Dandy second, 
You You third. Time 0:48£. 

Mile and an eighth, over four hurdles — Auriffera won, 
Rio Chico second, Artemus third. Time 2:07. 



Last Three Days at Denver. 

June 27. Seven furlongs, selling — Bulgarian won, 
Chloride second, Mr. Robson third. Time 1:29}. 

Six furlongs — Cerro Santa won, Don H. second, 
Thracia third. Time 1:16. 

Five furlongs — Hazel Hughlette won, Corvour sec- 
ond, Bettie B. third. Time 1:00}. 

Six furlongs — Corrello won, Larequoise second, 
Wautuches third. Time 1:16. 

Six furlongs — Summer won, Little Henry second, 
Torsion third. Time 1:16. 

June 28. Six furlongs — Ned Dennis won, Only 
Chance second, Cedarwood third. Time 1:17. 

Six furlongs — Jerid won, Virgie d'Or second, Lucy 
White third. Time 1:15. 

Six furlongs— Prince Russell won, Fernandino sec- 
ond, Gold Bug third. Time 1:15}. 

Four furlongs — Miss Bell won, McAlbert second, 
Posey third. Time 0:48. 

June 29. Five and a half furlongs — Don H. won, 
Sweet Voice second, Summer third. Time 1:0S|. 

Five and a half furlongs — Lucy White won, Caruth- 
ers second, Comet third. Time 1:09. 

Six furlongs — Virgie d'Or won, Alaria second, Betty 
B. third. Time 1:14. 

Four and a half furlongs — Virgil D. won, Joe D. 
second, Big Dutch third. Time 0:54}. 

Seven furlongs, gentlemen riders — Major (Mr. Llllie) 
won, Viola K. (Mr. Hogan) second, Torsion (Mr. Rob- 
erts) third. Time 1:34. 



Horse Owners Should. Use 
GOMBAULT'S 

Caustic 
Balsam 

The Great French Veterinary Remedy, 

A SAFE, SPEEDY AND 
POSITIVE CURE. 





SUPERSEDES ALL CAUTERY OF FIRINC 

Impossible to produce any scar or blemish. Tin. 
BTf^St best Blister <>ver used. TiikeH the pluc. 
01 nil liniments for mild or severe action. Iteniovee 
%\ I Bunches or Blemishes from 1 lorees or Cattle. 

As a HUMAN REMEDY for Rheumatism, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, lite, it is invariable. 
HfC fMIADAUTCC that one tublespormful oi 
HE UUAnAniEX CAUSTIC BALSAM wil' 
produce more actual results than a whole bottle o, 
any liniment or spavin cure r uxture ever made. 

Every bottle of Caustic L-alstam sold Is Warrnn 
ted to give satisfaction. Price ^ .50 per bottle. Hold 
Ay druunists. or sent by express, charges paid, with f til 
directions for ita. use. Send for descriptive circu:ars 
testimonials, eto, AddveM 

rH3 LAWRENCE-WILLIAMS CO., Cleveland. Ohio 



8 



[July 6, 190 -f 



KENNEL. 



Coming Events. 

July 16-Paciflc Advisory Board. Mouthly meeting J P 
Norman, Secretary. 

Bencb Shows. 

Aug. 27, 28, 29, 30— Pan-American Exposition Dog Show, Buffalo, 
N. Y. E. M. Oldham, Superintendent 

Sept 2, 3, 4, 5— Toronto Industrial Exhibition. Eleventh annual 
Dog Show, Toronto, Can. W. P. Fraser, Secretary and Superin- 
tendent. 

Sept. 3, 4, 5. 6— Columbia County Agricultural Society. Inaug- 
ural Show, Chatham, N. Y. M. T. Mason, Secretary. 

Sept. II, 12, 13, 14— West Virginia Exposition and State Fair 
Association. Annual Dog Show, Wheeling. W. Va. G. O. Smith, 
Manager. 

Sept. 24, 25, 26, 27— Middlesex East Agricultural Association 
Dog Show, Wakefleld, Mass. G. B Kirkpatrick, Secretary Bench 
Show Committee, Boston, Mass. 

Oct. 8, 9, 10, 11— Texas Kennel Club Dog Show, Dallas. Texas 
Sidney Smith, Secretary. 

Oct 8,9, 10, II— Danhury Agricultural Society. Dog Show, Dan- 
bury, Conn. James Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Nov. 27, 28, 29, 30— Philadelphia Dog Show Association. 3rd an- 
nual show Philadelphia, Pa. Marcel A. Viti. Secretary 



Em- 



Fleld Trials. 

Aug. 13— Iowa Field Trial Association. 4th annual trials, 
metsburg, la. Louis Verveer, Secretary, Des Moines, la. 

Aug. 20— South Dakota Field Trial Association. 2d annual trials 
Sioux Falls, S. D. Olav Haugtro, Secretary, Sioux Falls. S. D. 

Aug. 27— Wisconsin State Field Trial Association. Inaugural 
trials. , Wis. O W. Gothke, Secretary, Centrolia, Wis. 

Sept. 2, 3— Western Canada Kennel Club. Annual trials. La 
Salle, Man. H H. Cooper, Secretary, Winnipeg, Man. 

Sept. 10— Manitoba Field Trials Club. 15th annual trials. Car- 
man, Man, Eric Hamber, Secretary-Treasurer, Winnipeg. Man. 

Oct. 29— Monongahela Game Association. 7th annual trials. 
Senecaville, O. A. C. Peterson. Secretary, Homestead, Pa. 

Nov. Michigan Field Trials Association. 4th annual trials. 

, Mich. C. D. Stuart, Secretary, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Nov. ——Ohio Field Trial Club. 4th annual trials. , Ohio. 

C. E. Baughn, Secretary, Washington Court House, O. 

Nov. 11— Independent Field Trial Club. 3rd annual trials. . 

Out. VV. B. Wells, Honorary Secretary, Chatham, Ont. 

Nov. 12— International Field Trial Club. 13th annual trials 
Chatham Ont. W. B. Wells, Honorary Secretary, Chatham, Ont 

Nov. 12— Connecticut Field Trial Club. (Open to New England 
dogs), Hampton. Conn. F. M. Chapin. Secretary, Pine Meadow, 
Conn. 

Nov. 12— Kentucky Field Trial Club. 2nd annual trials. Glas- 
gow, Ky. Dr. F. W. Samuel. Secretary, Louisville, Ky. 

Some thoroughbred Gordon Setters are for sale. 
The announcement, which was received too late for 
the kennel page ads, will be found on page 12. 

Albert Joseph has found a companionable prize in 
the Cocker Plumoria Cleo, which he purchased at the 
May show. Cleo is not only a very good type speci- 
men but displays a degree of cleverness and intelli- 
gence that is remarkable. 

Mrs. E. B. Thompson, a lady of many admirable 
qualities and a well known St. Bernard fancier, passed 
away last week, we sincerely regret to announce. Mrs. 
Thompson was a prominent exhibitor at the bench 
shows in this city and her dogs won many ribbons for 
Irvington Kennels. 

To possess a poodle with the owner's monogram 
neatly clipped in curly fur is the very latest fad for 
fashionable ladies. Between the old-time dog fancier, 
who grabbed a dog by the neck with one hand while 
he sheared it with the other, and the modern artist, 
who clips monograms, rosettes, frills, chrysanthemums, 
and love-knots in doggy's silken hair, there is as much 
difference as between the ancient barber with his 
basin and the latter-day tonsorial artist with his 
electric tweezers. 

Phil C. Meyer lost his handsome St. Bernard bitch 
Belline one day last week. He had her out in the San 
Mateo h'lls near his kennels in company with some 
hounds. The dogs came across a dead chicken which 
had been killed by a hawk, and fought over the 
carrion, each tearing away a piece of the flesh and 
bones. Next day Belline showed symptoms of serious 
illness and shortly after died despite all efforts of a vet 
to save her. An autopsy showed a laceration of the 
stomach and intestines supposod to have been made by 
a sharp fragment of chicken bone, which probably had 
the effect of inducing blood poisoning. 

"I've got the funniest dog that ever strutted up and 
down the thoroughfare frightening little children," 
said "Hungry Bill" to a bunch of his cronies in Butler's 
the other day. "1 picked him up on the streets about 
about five weeks ago, and he is a wonder. Everybody 
calls him a turtlo hound, and I guess it is right, too, 
because he moves so slowly. I took him up to my Hat, 
and all he has done ever since has beon to lay in front 
of the grate with his nose about four inches from the 
tiro. You couldn't coax him away with a dip net, and 
he's so lazy we have to carry his meals to him." 

"That ain't nothing, " chirped in Frank Marcus of 
histrionic fame. "I have a brute that I use in my 
specialty that makes your turtle hound look like a one 
cent postage card dipped in oleomargarine. Mine is a 
lish hound and he fishes for his dinner every day. I 
call him Jasbo, but that doesn't count for anything, 
because he'll answer to any other name just as well. 
All I have to do is to tell him to stand on his hind feet, 
throw a row of back flips, jump through or anything 
else, and after receiving the command, he'll look at me 
instantaneously and then — lay down. I make him up 
with grease paint, but it isn't a success, as he always 
licks it off. Last week I decided to put a pair of 
slugg-ors on him, but he ate them up, too. I wrote a 
little one act farce for him entitled 'Quimbolee; or Fun 
in the Oakum Patch,' but it's a frost. He can't learn 
his lines, and after several rehearsals I became so dis- 
couraged that I called it off. Sorry, too, 'cause I was 
in hopes he'd be a great success. I'll keep on perse- 
vering, however, and some day he might be a good 
dog. I wish I could sell him." 



Advice to Beginners. 

In order that our advice may be of benefit not only 
to beginners simply in the dog fancy, but also to those 
who have already embarked in the alluring pursuit — 
as well as to others who may have passed the initiatory 
stages, but still are what we may term novices— we 
propose to commence with a young would-be fancier 
who hitherto has never owned a dog, or at least never 
been the fortunate possessor of one with any preten- 
sions to show bench distinction, so writes an English 
authority. After discussing the various breeds from 
which he may make his choice, we will not only give 
him our opinions upon the different varieties, but point 
out to him their virtues as companions, profitableness 
or otherwise of show dogs, costliness of keep, and all 
other information appertaining thereto. 

Commencing our article thus at the very alphabet of 
the fancy as it were, and leading our young readers on 
step by step through all the stages of the pursuit or 
"profession," as it was once described by an eminent 
barrister, from the elementary to the more advanced, 
and from the more advanced to the very proficient 
and successful fancier, by whose skilful kennel manage- 
ment, and the careful breeding, exhibition and sale of 
prize dogs, very large sums of money have frequently 
been amassed, if not a fortune secured. We do not 
intend to take our reader into the dreamy region of 
fiction, and there draw upon his imagination, nor yet 
trespass upon his credulity, by making him believe 
that the fancy is a paradise, whoso ranks he has only 
to join to be assured of a living right off, and a compe- 
tency by the time he arrives at that period in life 
when he is unable to follow his calling. What we 
shall write shall be truths. The illustrations we shall 
give will be from the actual, and our advice will not 
belong to the superficial, but come from long, intimate, 
and varied experience. It is only he who has "gone 
through the mill," who has tasted of the bitters and 
the sweets, that can advise his fellows, or at least 
whoso advice is worth following. Such we claim to be. 
This being so, as our article progresses, not only may 
the beginner learn the rudiments of fancier life, — in its 
higher moral aspect, we hope — the novice pick up 
much that may benefit him, the amateur profit by a 
perusal of our serial, but, before it is concluded, the 
expert may perhaps perceive in it something of which 
he was ignorant, learn a fresh "wrinkle" or two in a 
hobby in which he fancied ho knew everything. We 
can all learn something at times, and it is said, "a wise 
man may sometimes learn from a fool." 

We are at the onset supposing that our infant fan- 
cier has made up his mind to "go in for dogs," but 
should this article perchance reach some fancier who 
has never kept dogs, nor yet contemplated doing so, 
but who is still a fancier by virtue of having kept 
some other description of stock, we may have a word 
to say to him, and if he will but learn what we write, 
we venture to think by the time ho gets to the end of 
it his canine conversion will have been completely 
effected. 

First of all let us look at the dog fancy as it is to-day, 
let us consider it carefully and calmly, view its present 
associations and past history, and see whether or not 
it is advisable to be connected with dogs. 

At one time only two classes of the community were 
connected with dogs, viz., the very high society in the 
sporting aristocracy of the country and the very low 
and disreputable, such as the dog fighter and loafer. 
Whilst the virtues of the dog has been recognized by 
poets and great men in all ages almost, yet there was a 
time when the friend of man was held in very low 
esteem in this country, as he still is in some less civil- 
ized lands to-day. It was, no doubt, this period in the 
dog's history which gave rise to the common saying, 
"he's gone to the dogs," meaning a man having gone 
to the bad, become reduced in life in a low way. All 
this is changed, however; quite a transformation has 
taken place. With the advance of civilization, the 
human part of our nature seems to develop, and to-day 
the dog holds a high place in the affections of the 
people of all advanced countries, In later years the 
breeding and culture of prize dogs, both in England 
and America, in Australia and on the continent, has 
reached enormous proportions, so much so that the 
mongrel is fast disappearing off the face of the earth, 
and a prize bred dog is now beginning to be considered 
a necessary adjunct toevery well-appointed homestead. 
Dog shows have become an institution in the country, 
and are supported by all ranks of society, and in- 
stead of any disgrace now attaching to the ownership 
of a dog, a person possessing a good dog or a good 
kennel of dogs is looked upon with some degree of 
envy. This chango has no doubt been brought about 
by the better class of people interesting themselves 
in dogs, and the establishment of so many exhibitions 
all over the country. Innumerable specialists clubs 
devoted to particular breeds of dogs have sprung up, 
and as a consequence the breeding of prize dogs has 
developed into a great commercial enterprise in the 
country. In this way, Britain, as in many other items 
of merchandise, is the market of the world, and has 
very largely supplied America, Australia, and other 
countries with the best of her canine productions. 

It is notorious, the writer claims, and not without 
reason, that whatever breed of dog an Englishman 
takes up he always improves it. Take for instance 
the Dachshund, which has been greatly developed and 
improved in this country during the last ten or fifteen 
years, at which time public attention was first directed 
to it, in which breed we have a much bettor type than 
that which obtains in its native country, Germany. 
It is the same with the Bassethound, tho Great Dane, 
the Poodle, the Schipperko and Pomeranian, and it 
will soon be so, no doubt, with the Borzois. Coming 
nearer home, wo have in England far better Scotch 
collies, Scottish and Skye Terriers than are to be 
found in Scotland, and better Irish Setters, Terriers, 
and Water Spaniels than our Hibernian friends can 
boast of. 

J. J. Lynn left for Seattle on Tuesday. He will go 
East from that point and contemplates returning here 
in about three months. 



Hints to Old Beginners. 

By Jaok Bradshaw. 

On rearing a puppy. A few general hints— As the 
object of (not) rearing pups ia of course to get sympathy 
from your friends and nice, kind paragraphs in the 
Breeder and Sportsman, your pups should not only 
be of extraordinary value, but of exceptional promise, 
and when they dio you should be careful to suspect 
foul play, as jealous fanciers never lose an opportunity 
of poisoning each other's dogs, especially at dog shows. 
First of all, you must catch your pup, and the best 
way, unless you can steal one safely, is either to buy 
one or breed one. 

Practical Details — If you prefer to buy one do not do 
so through the kennel journals (as it is an open secret 
that the editors of those publications are in collusion 
with all sorts of respectable persons with real pedi- 
greed pups for sale and exchange at moderate prices), 
but tell your butcher when he calls for orders, or any 
grocery store clerk you see with an honest face, that 
you take a fancy to, that you want a pup, a really 
good one, very cheap. Do not worry tho man by fix- 
ing him down to any particular breed; leave all these 
"finicking" things to him. If he has not one to sell 
himself that will just suit you (which will be very 
strange) ho is sure to have "a friend" who, to oblige 
him, will bo glad to oblige you with the pick of a 
champion-bred litter at a ridiculously low price and at 
a tremendous sacrifice. 

But don't pay this philanthropist the price he asks 
at first. Beat him down to two dollars if you can, 
which is a reasonable price for a thoroughbred pup of 
any breed, provided it has enough pedigree and you 
have the verbal assurance of the vendor that it is 
bound to win in any company. If you can get the pup 
at about a week or ten days old so much the better, as 
you will not have all the bother of "weaning" it, and 
will be saved a world of trouble with its teething. It 
should be buried (with a toaspoonful of Squatts' in- 
comparable disinfectant) under a favorite rose-brush. 
Time, .'t to 4 days; average cost per pup, $2.30. 

If, on the other hand, you prefer to breed your own 
pup, do not harass yourself and keep yourself awake 
at nights thinking about a suitable mate for your dog. 
Mating dogs of the samo breed, a practice becoming 
annually more prevalent among fanciers, tends to pro- 
duce a great monotony in the type, and nothing is 
more tiresome than monotony. And do not waste 
time and thought over the "condition" of the parente. 
Of course, too much follicular mange in either of them 
is inadvisable, but do not be discouraged by trifles. 
You will never succeed in the show ring if you are 
easily discouraged. 

The main points when breeding your own pups, are 
to see that the mothor for at least two weeks before- 
hand is kept on as low a diet as possible (milk especi- 
ally being avoided), and when the puppies are expected, 
select some spot for their "nest" that is thoroughly 
ventilated, and where a keen, hearty draught can blow 
upon the litter, otherwise there is the danger of the 
pups being born with sound constitutions. For if you 
begin by feeding the mother well and finding her a 
warm corner screened from all currents, you run a 
great risk of rearing strong, healthy pups which will 
go romping all over the place, worrying the furniture 
all to pieces, destroying, for instance, your flower beds 
or potted plants, committing every sort of mischief, 
and to tho last day of their lives will be a continual 
source of expense to you in food. If tho pups are born 
alive, do not destroy any of them. This is a very cruel 
practice. On the contrary, remember tho old adage, 
"the more the merrier," and if you hear of any other 
puppies that are going to be drowned, rescue the poor 
mites from a watery grave and mix them up with your 
own litter. "You cannot have too much of a good 
thing." Until their eyes are open do not leave them 
too much with their mother, but take them out with 
you for drives in the carriage, let the children have 
them to play with, keep them with you on the lawn 
or in the drawing-room. This gives the little creatures 
change of scene, and prevents them over-feeding them- 
selves or over-sleeping, as they are liable to do if left 
with the mother. (Should they seem to miss their 
natural food, you cannot do better than keep them for 
a few hours a day in an empty case of Squatts' inval- 
uable codliver-oil vermicular cakes.) The mother 
while nursing should be given only meat and custards, 
and plentv of it, otherwise there is a serious chance of 
her escaping the maladies incidental to her condition, 
and the pups run some risk of protracting their exis- 
tence. It is best to bury the whole litter together 
(with one tablespoonful of the Damnitas Company's 
matchless powder per pup), leaving room in the grave 
for the mother. 

Time — Eight to ten days. Average cost per litter, 
next to nothing. 

The Mother— If she seems to worry after the loss of 
her litter, feed her generously on a rich milk diet, and 
if she does not get worse very soon, give her a dose or 
two of something that you have invented yourself, and 
then write and ask Dr. Squills, V. S., to guess how it 
all happened. 

This is a note for bench show enthusiasts, although 
the average owner of a prize ribbon lifter cares little 
or nothing about the natural history of his animal. 
The dog is grouped with the fox, although the pupil 
of the eye is round, whereas the fox owns a perpendi- 
cular slit. The dog is found under the division Verte- 
brata, class Mammalia, order Feroe, family Felidoe, 
and the sub-family Canina. As a species it is known 
as Canina familiaris. The sub-family is distinguished 
by the possession of two tubercular teeth placed be- 
hind the canines in the upper jaw. Now, then, who 
says he knows all about a dog? 

Kennel Registry. 

VISITS 

P- D. Linville's English Setter bitch Love Knot (Meroury— 
Sweetheart's Last) to H. L. Betten's Cavalier (Ch. Count Glad- 
stone IV— Daisy Cratt) June 24th, 26th, 1901. 



July 6, 1901] 



9 




Coming Events. 

July 7— California Wing Club. Live birds. Ingleside. 

July 7— Union Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 

July 7— Lincoln Gun Club. iBlue rocks. Alameda Junction, 

July 7— Antler Gun Club. Blue Rocks. Empire Club grounds. 
Alameda Junction. 

July 7— Sacramento Gun Club. Blue rock preliminary. Kimball 
& Upson grounds. Sacramento. 

July IS, H — Blue Rock Tournament. Sacramento. 

July 14— Olympic Gun Club. Live birds. Ingleside. 

July 14 — San Francisco Gun Club. Blue rocks. iDgleside. 

July 14— Empire Gun Club Blue rocks. Alameda Junction. 

July 21— Olympic Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 

July 21— Washington Gun Club. Blue rocks. Washington, Yolo 
county. 

July 23, 24, 25, 26 — Second Annual Grand American Handicap 
Tournament. Blue rocks. Interstate Association. Interstate 
Park. Queens, L. I. 



At the Traps. 

The July shoot of the California Wing- Club at live 
birds will take place at Ingleside to-morrow. The 
club race at fifteen birds will be the main event of the 
meeting. Sweepstakes will follow the club race. 

The Lincoln Gun Club members will shoot at blue- 
rocks on the club grounds at Alameda Junction. A 
race at 100 targets, $20 entrance, is billed. A number 
of shooters have already signified their intention of 
entering the match. 

The Antler Gun Club shoot at bluerocks will take 
place to-morrow on the Empire grounds at Alameda 
Junction. 

At Sacramento a large attendance of trap shooters 
will take part in practice events for the tournament a 
week hence. 

The Union Gun Club shoot last Sunday was fairly 
well attended by club members and visitors. The 
opening event at six birds with eleven shooters up, 
gave four guns a record of straight. Eight entries 
were in the side pool, the purse being divided by 
Shaw, Feudner and Walsh. Fifteen shooters competed 
in the club race at twelve birds, nine entries were in the 
side pool. George Sylvester was the only contestant 
who scored clean. Although favored by drawing a 
number of easy birds he proved to be a steady, calm 
shooter who made a good many effective centers with 
the first barrel. He won first money in the side pool. 
Fred Feudner, who lost his first bird, a hot one from 
three trap, won second money and Pete Walsh and 
"Mascot" divided third money. The latter shooter is 
a youth who gives much promise of a clever career as 
a trap shot. The shooters in the club race were handi- 
capped in distance. Each shooter after killing four 
straight went back a yard. In a second six-bird race 
Walsh, Shaw and Sylvester divided the purse. The 
birds supplied averaged a goodly number of strong ones. 
The shooting of the participants, considering that 
many of them are not constant in their live bird prac- 
tice, was a fair average. Parson Jones was hoodood 
by a corduroy hat and Senator Iverson mislaid his 
rabbit's foot, which accounts for the incomplete scores 
made by these two shooters. The scores in full were 
as follows: 

First event, 6 birds, 30 yards rise, high guns, $1.50 
entrance, birds extra, side pool — 

Hoyt 112222—6 Burnell 112012—5 

Shaw 222222—6 Thomas 021022—4 

Walsh 121111— fi Cuthbert 0111*1—4 

Feudner 111212-6 Iverson 111002—4 

Robinson 222121— fi Jones *22012— 4 

King 222*21—5 Lewis 200200—4 

*Dead out 

Second event, club race, 12 birds, distance handicap, 
$3.00 entrance Side pool, $2.00 entrance, class shoot- 
ing, three moneys — 

Yds. 

Sylvester, G 28—11111 lllll 21—12 

Burnell, M 28—11112 11112 01—11 

Robertson, A. W 30—21212 10212 11—11 

Feudner, F 31—01222 22212 12—11 

Wlash, P. J 30-11121 11110 10—10 

Cooper, R.. 27—11001 21122 22—10 

"Mascot" 27—21011 21122 10—10 

Hoyt, H 28—12001 21221 10— 9 

King, F. W 30—22110 02211 02— 9 

Shaw, C H 31—22202 20222 20— 9 

Parson Jones 28—10100 22111 12— 9 

Thomas, Geo 28—21221 20112 00— 9 

Iverson, M. J 28—02102 22220 20— 8 

Cuthbert, M 30—02010 20201 00— 5 

Lewis. T. L 31—22020 01000 00— 4 

Third event, 6 birds, 30 yards rise, high guns, $1.50 
entrance, birds extra, side pool — 

Walsh 112122—6 Feudner 021221—5 

Shaw 222222—6 Iverson 11 10*2—5 

Sylvester 1 12121—6 Lewis 000012—2 

Fourth event, 6 birds, 30 yards rise, pool, $1.50 en- 
trance, high guns — 

Walsh 211121—6 "Wilson" 111*22—5 

Shaw 222222—6 Ford 22*121—5 

Feudner 222122—6 Lewis 000120—2 

Sylvester 011 12 1-^5 

The Capital City Gun Club held its regular shoot 
last Sunday. Thirty-one members facod the traps, 
with twelve visitors, making forty-three in all, which 
was the largest shoot held in Sacramento this season. 
Stevens won the honors in the championship class. 
Gusto, though not in the championship class, proved 
himself to be such by making the best score of the 
day, breaking 24 out of a possible 25. C. Palm was 
high in the second class, breaking 20. His scores dur- 
ing the day were remarkable for one who has shot for 
such a short time, this being his first season at blue- 
rocks. W. Flint was an easy winner in the third 
class. He has shown much improvement since the 
season opened. Hoilbron, who looked like the winner 
in that class, finished second with Dr. Woods. New- 
bert and Vetter divided second money in the cham- 
pionship class, and Black and Smith divided third. 
Frazee took second money in the first class, with 23. 
Maxwell took third money. Just took second money 



!n the second class, and Bauer third. L. Smith took 
third in the third class. The scores below will show 
how the others finished. 
Club shoot at 25 blue rocks, championship class — 

Stevens lllll 10111 11110 lllll 11111—23 

Newbert 01111 lllll 01011 lllll 11111—22 

Vetter lllll 10101 lllll lllll 11111—22 

Black 10010 01011 lllll 11011 11111—19 

Smith, W 11001 11110 11011 00111 11111—19 

Kindsberg lllll 01010 10111 01111 01101—18 

First class — 

Gusto lllll lllll 11101 lllll 11111—24 

Frazee lllll 11110 11011 lllll 11111—23 

Upson lllll 10011 lllll 11101 10011— -20 

Maxwell 01111 01101 11101 11011 11011—19 

Weldon 11101 11011 10101 11110 10101—18 

Trumpler 01111 10110 01011 10101 11110—17 

Adams 11011 11011 10101 11110 00011—17 

Ruhstaller 01011 01111 11010 01101 11110—17 

Second class — 

Palm ...10111 11101 11110 01111 01111—20 

Just mn ooooi oini 11111 non-19 

Bauer 11110 11000 01111 10111 01111—18 

Denmau 11101 10110 lllll 01001 01101—17 

Chapman 00001 11100 11110 11110 01100—14 

Graham 00011 10101 00101 01011 11101—14 

Hughes 00010 11110 01101 00100 01111—13 

Favero OHIO 11110 11010 01000 11100—13 

Third class — 

Flint lllll 01111 11001 11011 01110—19 

Dr. Woods 01010 01100 11101 10110 11111—16 

Heilbron 01011 11011 00110 11110 00111—16 

Smith, L OHIO 10111 01111 00101 00100—14 

Contell 11001 00101 00001 01111 10110—13 

Smith, S 10001 01 1 10 00001 11011 01010—12 

Maier 10011 10001 00101 01010 10100—11 

Walker 01111 00100 10001 OOOill 00011—10 

Meredith 00000 11100 11000 01000 00110— 8 

During the day the shooters indulged in pool matches, 
more than a dozen of which were shot off at from ten 
to fifteen blue rocks each. Some 3000 of the asphalt 
disks were trapped during the day. 



The members of the Del Paso Trap Club held the 
final shoot for this season on their grounds Sunday 
last. Frank Ruhstaller Jr., won the high average for 
the season, killing 37 out of his last 40 birds. F. B. 
Adams shot in good form, grassing his birds nicely, 
and F. Wright, who is a new man before the traps, 
showed marked improvement. Following are the 
scores in the club race at 20 birds — 

Ruhstaller, F. Jr 12221 11110 22121 11112—19 

Adams, F. B 12211 12112 21120 11011—18 

Wright, F lllll *10*1 102*1 11211 15 

Hughes, J lllll 0001* 11101 21112—15 

Upson, L. S 10122 20222 11112 02010—10 

Weldon, Dr 202*2 20120 01121 02221—14 

The bluerock tournament at Sacramento on the 13th 
and 14th insts. will be held under the management of 
Kimball and Upson. The program for Saturday, the 
first day, embraces four events: No. 1, 20 targets, en- 
trance $1, purse $15, $10 and $5. No. 2, 20 targets, en- 
trance $1, three moneys. No. 3, 20 targets, entrance 
$1.50, purse $25, $15, $10 and $5. No. 4, merchandise 
shoot, entrance $1, eight classes, sixteen prizes. Sun- 
day's program, seven events: No. 1, 20 targets, en- 
trance $1.50, purse $25, $15 and $10. No. 2, 20 targets, 
entrance $2, purse $40, $25 and $15. No. 3, 20 target*, 
entrance $2.50, purse $40, $25, $15 and $10. No. 4, 20 
targets, Kimball and Upson trophy, winner to receive 
one-third of the entrance money and two-thirds of the 
entrance money at the next tournament. Trophy 
must be won three times to become individual prop- 
erty. Cup to be contested for in Northern California 
only. No. 5, 20 targets, entrance $5, purse $60, $45, 
$30 and $20. No. 6, merchandise shoot, ten classes 
(first prize an L. C. Smith hammerless gun), no shooter 
to receive more than one prize; ties miss and out. 
No. 7, team shoot for championship of Northern Cali- 
fornia, entrance $6 per man. Captain Ruhstaller offers 
a handsome button for the high average gun on 
Sunday. 

From the foregoing schedule it will be seen that a 
big tournament is on the tapis for Sacramento and 
visiting sportsmen. The list of cash prizes is an in- 
ducing one for a large entry. 

The Millwood Gun Club held their first trap shoot last 
Sunday at Mill Valley. The officers are M. L. Ar- 
nold, president; Wm. Mersf elder, secretary; Wm. 
Crandall, treasurer. The club grounds are located at 
Dick McDonald's, Mill Valley Junction. The member 
making the best score each month wears the high gun 
monthly medal. The records for Sunday's shooting 
are: 

Birds 10 25 15 15 

Arnold, M. L 8 18 10 12 

Crandall, W 8 16 12 15 

Mersf elder, W 5 10 8 9 

Turpin, F. Blair 7 12 9 10 

Walker, 1 18 

Van Orden, V 6 12 8 8 

Broad, A. F 12 8 8 

Moldrup, E 6 10 

Nash, M 15 9 14 

Price, W. H 6 22 12 10 



The screaming Walloon is a hard duck to kill. Its 
hide is very tough and is thickly covered with feath- 
ers and down. Besides the bird is a great diver, one 
of the kind that used to "dive at the Hash" when 
hunted with the old arm that flashed when fired. It 
is of very little value for table use, being so tough. 
The only way to manage it at all is to skin it and par- 
boil it in a big pot with plonty of water. The negroes 
make caps of the Walloon skins. 

"They are great ducks for diving, "says Wharfinger 
Tom Casey, who has takon a shot at nearly all kinds 
of feathered game. "They can dive quickor, go down 
deeper, remain under water longer and come up far- 
thor away than any other duck that frequents our 
waters. I remember onco, when I was East, I suc- 
ceeded in killing a Walloon, and, being short of game 
for the table, I determined to cook my bird. I got a 
n9gro to skin it, giving him the hide for his trouble. 
After being cleaned we put him in a great pot full of 
water and under it kindled a hot .'ire. After awhile I 
wanted to see how the cooking of my duck progressed 
and lifted the top off the boiling pot, but there was so 
much steam escaping I could not see into the pot and 
struck a match over it. The blamed Walloon, sir, 
dived at the flash of the match. It disappeared and 
has never been seen since." 



The Walla Walla T ournament. 

The annual tournament of the Sportsman's Associa- 
tion of the North |West at Walla Walla embraced 
three day's of blue rock shoting, June 27 th, 26th and 
27th and the two following days at the live bird traps. 
O ver 100 shooters were engaged in the blue rock events 
the attendance at the live bird matches was also good. 
The total number of individual targets the first day for 
each shooter was 165, second day 190 and third day 165. 
The total entrance money for the first day was $22.50; 
second day $25; third day $24; fourth day $22.50, fifth 
day $25. Tho moneys in most of the target events 
were divided under the Rose system which was in vogue 
when the money was not divided 40, 30, 20 and 10 pet- 
cent. Four sets of traps were used. All traps faced 
the northwest. Nos. 1 and 2 were each a set of three 
expert traps arranged on the Sergeant system. No. 3 
was a set of five expert traps and at No. 4 bulkhead 
was a Maugatrap for extra events and pool shooting. 
The annual meeting of the association was held on 
June 26th and the following officers elected for the 
ensuing year: Harry Beale, of Portland, President; 
P. J. Holohan, of Wallace, First Vice President; R. S. 
Cox, of Seattle, Second Vice President; Dr. T. F. 
Smith of Tacoma, Third Vice President; Harvey More- 
land of Portland, Secretary-Treasurer. 

The next tournament will be held in Portland. 
Several ladies entered in different events and made 
creditable records smashing blue rocks with their guns. 
Eight 15 target events were contested on the first day, 
the trophy races were the fifth event for the Multno- 
mah medal valued at $250, three moneys, 25 blue rocks 
which was won by Guist; second money ($26.87), 
Sheard, Cooper; third money ($8.06), Stevens, Ware of 
Spokane, Engart, Baltimore; fourth money ($2.68), 
Young, Dr. Smith, Holohan of Wallace, Howe, F. C. 
Stevens, Brindley, Montieth, Whitworth. The con- 
cluding match for the day was the tenth event, a three 
man team championship trophy race 20 bluerocks per 
man, three moneys and trophy valued at $250, 18 en- 
tries, purse $185. This trophy was held by the 
Spokane club. The event did not count in the general 
averages. This race was a tie, Tacoma and Wallace 
teams breaking 55. The shoot off was to tako place 
later in the week. The Tacoma team was Smith, 
Rowe and Sheard; the Wallace team, Flohr, Holohan 
and Whitlaw. Second money, $13.46, Flint, McBroom 
and Ware of Spokane; Ellis, MacLoughlin and Stevens, 
of Seattle; Campbell, Peck and Howe, of Walla Walla, 
all with 54. Third money, $13.4(5, Jaeger, Wright and 
Smith,- of Butte; Smith, Cartwright and Clark, of 
Wardner, both with 53. 

On the second day eight fifteen target races were shot 
up and two trophy events. The Globe trophy race, 50 
blue rocks, $5 entrance, was not completed and the 
Brownlee medal event was postponed. The Globe 
trophy was shot for Thursday morning and won by 
Sheard of Tacoma. There were 67 entries and a purse 
of $385. Ware of Spokane and Sheard tied, and in the 
shoot-off Sheard won by 43 out of 50. McLaughlin of 
Seattle, Stevens and Sharp took second; Dr. Smith, L. 
A. Smith and Hillis, of Libby, Mont., took third. This 
was the great event of the day. 

Event No. 20, shot also on Thursday, was the 
Brownlee medal and was also won by Sheard of Tacoma, 
after a hard fight. The medal and a purse of $288 
made good shooting. Twenty targets were used, ex- 
pert rules, indicator pull, known angles, four unknown 
and one known traps. Clark, Stevens, Waite, took 
second money; Stevens (F. C), Sharp, Huse, Nalback, 
Peck, Smails, Spargo and Straight third. 

In an extra event Sharp won the $75 shotgun donated 
by the Remington company. 

The Anaconda cup was event No. 23, and after a 
hard day's shooting had to be held over. The Brownlee 
trophy contest was also unfinished at dark on Thursday. 

On Friday principal closing bluerock events make 
this showing: Event 23 was tho Anaconda cup, En- 
yart, Cullison, Guist and Howe tied with 24 out of 25. 
In the shoot-off Guist broke 24; Enyart, 23; Howe, 21; 
Cullison, 17. 

The last event in bluerocks was tho individual cham- 
pionship for a gold medal, 25 targets, $4 entrance, and 
purse of $252, with sixty-three entries. J. J. Plummer 
of Boise, Idaho, made 25 straight and lied with Frank 
Howe of Walla Walla. In the shoot-off Plummer won, 
making another straight, Howe losing one. This is 
the best record of the tournament, 99 out of a possible 
100. Second went to L. H. Smith, McLaughlin, Holo- 
han, Snyder, Morritt, Ware, Sharp, C. H. Smith, 
Stacy, Nell, Peck. Third, Wood, Twohy, Hillis, 
Sheard, Stevens, Cooper, Flohr,. Enyart, McBroom, 
Waite, F. S. Stevons, Knettle, Bigelow. 

Live-bird event 1, 7 pigeons, entrance $7.50, with 
purse of $352, gave first to Wood, McLaughlin, Ellis, 
Cooper, Donham, Bigelow, Becker, Plummer, Dent, 
Whitworth, Haight, Sheard, Kelly, Stillman, Murphy. 
Second, Sear?, Huse, Lougee, Merritt, Hughes, 
Straight, Dr. Smith, McBroom, Guist, Forbes, Russell, 
Cartwright, Hillis, Waite, Van Dorn, Peck. 

The live-bird shooting was very slow and unsatisfac- 
tory, the birds being sluggish, many of them young. 
Three live bird events were shot. In these tho num- 
ber of ontries had fallen down, .many of the shooters 
having left. 

On Saturday tho tournament closed, but one short 
event being shot off. This was tho 25 live bird event, 
entrance $25, birds extra, 15 entries, open to the world, 
purse $300. First, 24, Denham of Tacoma; second, 23, 
Ware of Spokane; Sheard of Tacoma. 

Nearly all tho shootors had gone homo, few waiting 
for the fiual shoot, which did not excite a groat deal of 
interest."' The individual averages have not been 3'et 
made up,eithor for soparatedays or for tho tournament. 

H. G. Lougee, a familiar figure early this season and 
last year at the local traps shot with tho Spokane Rod 
and Gun Club and was in tho monoy every day of tho 
big shoot. 

H. E. Skinner Co., 416 Market street, have received, 
direct from New Mexico, a choice lot of genuine Navajo 
tndian blankets, which they are selling 25% less than 
jhe usual rates. These blankets make the best camp- 
ing beds on earth, and, in addition, are also largely 
used as rugs and portieres. 



10 



[JUT.Y f>, 1901 




Coming Events. 



July 1— Striped bass season opens. 
July 1— Black bass season opens. 
July 13— Saturday Contest No. 7. 
a:30 P. m. 

July 14-Sunday Contest No 7. Class series. Stow lake, 10 A M 



Class series. Stow lake 



Escaped to the Woods. 

We, who were caged as by a wall 

In cities paved and mural, 
Escaped, now seek cool shades, where all 

Is fresli and green and rural. 
Sweet-singing woods, we come to you, 

Whose melody delights us; 
Each nodding bough, as 'round we view, 

But beckons and invites us. 

Here, in your song crowned alley may 

We list to glorious voices; 
The happy birds' ideal lay 

Seems sung but to rejoice us, 
And straying through your twilight dell, 

Leaves wave green banners o'er us; 
Odors from flowers invisible 

Rise o'er the path before us. 

With you, dear woods, how calmed our mood, 

Nature her largeness showing, 
Where God is seen in plainest good, 

His growing joys bestowing; 
Where birds and insects, brooks and trees, 

Harmoniously living, 
Together chant their litanies 

With praises and thanksgiving. 

—George Birdseye. 



Hints to Anglers. 

Some years ago, when I knew more about fly-fishing 
than I ever shall again, writes H. P. Wells in " Fly Rods 
and Fly Tackle, " I made a fishing trip to Tobyhanna, in 
Pennsylvania. I had frequently fished streams within 
thirty or forty miles of there, and supposed I at least 
know where to look for sport. The weather was pro- 
pitious, rather showery perhaps, but still a good fish- 
ing day. The stream was a wading brook of brownish 
color, quick water being succeeded by still reaches, 
apparently stagnant. I fished the rapid water with 
care and indifferent success. The still waters, though 
they were less obstructed and easier to cast over, I 
ignored altogether, because the look of the banks and 
the water indicated a muddy bottom, and I then be- 
lieved trout never frequonted such localities. When I 
returned in the evening to the hotel I was astonished 
to no small degree when the landlord informed me 
that these were the very cream of the whole fishing. 
Nor was this all. I found that the small, sober-tinted 
Hies 1 bad been accustomed to were next to worthless, 
and that Hies larger than I supposed were ever success- 
fully used for trout, and much more gaudy in color, 
were needed in those waters. These revelations had 
not a little undermined my self-confidence, but its utter 
annihilation was reserved for the next day. 

I thon met my landlord on the stream. I was east- 
Ing in what I considered very fair style, and when my 
Hies lit upon the water I drew them diagonally across 
the stream, the droppers just skimming the surface. I 
had then never seen nor heard of any other method of 
manipulating artificial Hies in trout fishing, and that 
this was not the only proper manner to display them 
at all times, in all places, and under all conditions, I 
had never entertained the most remote suspicion. 
After feeling his way with some caution, in order to be 
suro the suggestion would not be deemed officious, he 
said: "That method of handling the flies may bo all 
right on small streams and in clear water, but here it 
is next to useless." 

Had he told me that the Hies should bo displayed on 
the bank, rather than on the stream, I could scarcely 
have been more astonished. Utterly demoralized, I 
surrendered the rod and asked for a practical exhibi- 
tion of his method. The first cast at once indicated 
the expert. The Hies lit lightly on the water, and 
there remained for at least thirty seconds, without 
other motion than that they gradually sunk below the 
surface. Then he drew them towards him by a series 
of very slow and short pulls, each separated by a brief 
pause from its predecessor, till near enough for an- 
other cast. 

That trip, though the net result in the way of fish 
was nothing to boast of, was one of the most remuner- 
ative fishing excursions I have ever made; for I then 
learned to be extremely diffident when strange waters 
were under discussion, and invariably to listen, with 
at least apparent patience and respect, to the sugges- 
tionsor views of others. 

No method of fly-fishing possesses the charm of wad 
ing. Through scenes where nature shows her utmost 
loveliness the trout-stream takes its way, itsfc.t a jewel 
mirroring in its bosom every detail of its faultipaa set- 
ting. Deep shadows, gemmed with specks of sunshine 
cover the water. Stately trees, graceful ferns and 
flowers and; mossy rocks line its banks. Every turn of 
the stream is a new picture, varied in detail but uni- 
form in beauty — at once the delight and the despair of 
the artist. The cool, damp airgivesuew life and vigor 
to lungs charged with the foul vapors of city life, while 
over all the murmur of the living water proclaims here 
is peace. 

It may happen to the angler to wander far, and cast 
his fly upon many waters. But no matter what success 



attends his efforts elsewhere, his memory still delights 
to linger, above all, on the quiet beauties of those happy 
days, when youth and he wandered hand in hand 
together down the murmuring stream. Not only is it 
in every way the most delightful, since every sense is 
fed, but it is at the same time the most artistic method 
of flj -fishing. 

He who thinks to have much sport with the fly at 
the expense of the trout of the much-lished brooks and 
streams of the New England and middle states must 
bring every resource of his art to bear, and that from 
a well-stocked arsenal. Civilization in its onward 
march oducates trout as well as men, and many an 
angler, whose catch in the wilds of Maine is only 
limited by his desires, could hardly take enough in the 
waters first mentioned to impart a smell to his creel. 

It is uot my purpose to tell when, where and how to 
fish those waters, since that has already been described 
by no less a master than Thaddeus Norris himself, as 
well as many other and lesser lights of the gentle art. 
[ frankly admit I can improve in nothing on what they 
have said. But some practical hints what to do that 
tho sport of the present may be unalloyed with injury 
to the health, and pain in the future, may perhaps not 
be amiss. 

Firstly, the clothing should be sober gray in color, 
that if possible the suspicious game m y mistake the 
motions of the angler for the waving of some branch 
of a forest tree wooed by the summer wind. Upon the 
feet low heavy shoes should be worn, studded on the 
soles and heels with a few, and but a fow, soft hobnails; 
or better still, those round headed nails sometimes seen 
in cowhide boots. As these wear smooth they should 
be removed and new ones substituted. 

It will bo necessary to give your personal attention 
to this, for the heart of the average shoemaker is 
modeled on his own lapstone. In vain will be your 
order to put in but a few, and delusive his promise to 
comply. Either he revels in the use of hobnails, or his 
idea of ''a few" is complied with as long as any portion 
of the solo is visible between the heads. It is not alone 
to the cohesion of iron with stone that the benefit de- 
rived from the use of hobnails in wading is due, but 
also to tho interspaces thus formed in the bottom of 
the solo, ongaging with the inequalities of the rocky 
surface with which it is brought in contact. If the 
nails are used in excoss, the shoes then become practi- 
cally paved with iron, and the second element of safety 
is lost. 

Through the uppers at the instep and close to the 
soles, the leather should be pierced three or four times 
with the small blade of a penknife, that when the 
stream is abandoned for the bank the water may find 
egress. But these holes must be small and made as I 
have said by a single cut with closely adjacent edges, 
or sand and gravel will enter to the great annoyance 
of the angler. 

The drawers and stockings should be of wool, with- 
out tho admixture of any cotton whatever. This is of 
the first importance to health. The difference in com- 
fort arising from this cause is wonderful. After the 
lirst. immersion, with woolen socks and underclothes, 
the wader will experience no chill in or out of the 
water, except, perhaps, a momentary ring of cold 
when the water rises to an unaccustomed height. He 
will hardly know, as far as any sensation of cold is 
concornod, whether he is wet or dry. But if cotton 
underclothes are worn, or those with an appreciable 
admixture of cotton, a chill is experienced at once on 
exposure to the slightest wind, or even on leaving the 
water when the air is still. This cannot but be preju- 
dicial to health. Red Shaker flannel is the best mate- 
rial for this purpose, probably because it is honestly 
made. 

The landing net for this fishing should be quite 
small, of oval form, tho bow eight or nine inches wide, 
and a foot long. The handlo need not exceed six 
inches in length, and should be provided with a leather 
tag containing a button-hole, to be attached to a but- 
ton secured to the back of the coat just below the 
collar. This is tho most convenient way to dispose of 
a very inconvenient necessity. Rattan makes as good 
a bow as anything. 

When a fish is struck, get him out of tho water in 
which he was caught as soon as possible, lest tho oth- 
ers, which wore probably in his company, take alarm — 
and out of the current as well. Play him till quite 
exhausted, thon reel him in short, drop your wading 
staff, and roach behind and unbutton the net. Then, 
throwing the tip of the rod backward, slip the net 
under him quietly and lift him out. Next support 
your rod between your body and the upper part of 
your right arm, take the net in the right hand, and 
grasp the fish by the gills with tho left. Then tuck 
your net under your loft arm and proceed to kill your 
fish. Never neglect this. It is most cruel and un- 
sportsmanlike to force them to writhe their lives 
slowly away in the creel. This may be instantly ac- 
complished by striking the head once or twice with 
the butt of the rod, or the thumb may be placed back 
of the head and the forefinger hooked under the lower 
jow, and the head bont sharply over against the back. 
Death is instantaneous. Then unhook the fish, re- 
place the net, retrieve the wading staff, and try for 
another. 

In wading keep out of the water all you can, and 
never, if it is possible to avoid it, traverse a spot where 
trout are likely to lio. Remember there may be some 
other angler behind you, and do not spoil his sport 
because you may happen to have found none. It by 
no means follows, because you were unsuccessful, that 
the pool was untenanted; if you plunge through it 
you may so alarm the fish that they will refuse to rise 
for hours. 

Not unfrequently gentlemen will be met at a lishing 
locality whose outfit, chosen in ignorance of the pecu- 
liarities of that water, is utterly unsuited there. To a 
brother angler so situated spare freely from your 
superabundance, giving him all possible assistance. 
Proprioty and policy alike forbid that the eager com- 
petition of everyday life should contaminate this sport. 

If tho beginner will take a piece of bristol board as 
long as the pocket of his fly-book will conveniently 
hold, mark one edge in inches, and then copy the fol- 
lowing table upon it, he will be able by it to ascertain 



the weight of the trout he takes very closely without 
weighing: 



Inches. 

ii pound 9 

V, pound ll}< 

\ pound 13 

1 pound 14 

\H pounds 15 

1 5 £ pounds 16 

Kt pounds 17 

•■i'/t pounds 18 



Inches. 

3 pounds 19 

3\", pounds 20 

4 pounds 21 

4& pounds 22 

5's pounds 22y, 

6 pounds 23^4 

7 pounds 244 



Suppose we wish to ascertain the weight of a trout, 
and have no means of weighing it. If wo cut a twig to 
the length of the trout over all — that is, from the end 
of its nose to the extreme end of the tail fin — ascertain 
the length of the twig by the inch marks on the strip 
of bristol board, and then consult the table, we will 
learn his actual weight so nearly as never to be put to 
confusion should our statement of its weight be con- 
fronted with proof of its actual weight. As the size 
increases, the margin of possible error increases. If 
tho fish is not over nineteen inches long, and is in nor- 
mal condition, neither unusually thin nor unusually 
hog-backed, the table will probably give its real 
weight within an ounce one way or the other. Should 
you take a trout twenty-two inches long, for example, 
he will appear to be a very large trout. I have heard 
such estimated, even by experienced anglers not accus- 
tomed to see trout io large, all the way from six up to 
seven pounds and a half. Hut you may be morally 
certain if that fish is not so hog-backed as to amount 
to obvious absolute deformity, and does not measure 
over twenty-two inches in length, that it does not 
fairly weigh as much as five pounds. 

Izaak Walton and his incomparable book, ''The 
Compleat Angler," have been recently brought to the 
attention of anglers, in a most unexpected and unique 
form. It seems that a publication that has just come to 
light in Lancaster, Pa., where it lay unknown and un- 
noticed for nearly three-quarters of a century, has re- 
vived interest in the best known of all fishermen, the 
peerless craftsman, good old Walton. This publica- 
tion is neither book, booklet, nor yet a broadside. It 
is a piece of fine white silk, 3 feet by 2 feet 9 inches in 
size, and is a fitting memorial to the groat angler. 

In the center of this silk cloth is a portrait of Wal- 
ton. He is represented as a man of sixty-five or 
seventy years, with a most genial face, long, flowing 
white hair, in robust health, and in good humor with 
all the world. His name is within the printed frame 
that surrounds the picture. Arranged around the 
central figure on every side are pictures of the princi- 
pal game fishes of Britain described by Walton, such 
as the trout, perch, grayling, tench, chub, salmon, 
roach, carp, dace, pike and others, each surrounded by 
a handsomely painted border, within which is the 
name of the fish and the proper season for catching it 
and how to fish for it. Space is also allotted to what 
is no doubt intended to represent a proper fishing rod 
of tho period, although it is without a reel. A landing 
net also finds an appropriate place. 

Around the outer margin are spaces in which the 
most taking flies for each kind of fish are figured, and 
along with them the best natural bait for the various 
fish and recipes for making many kinds of paste for 
the same purpose. At the bottom of the picture an 
"Angler's Song" is given, accompanied by the music. 
A prominent place in the picture is allotted to the fol- 
lowing legend: 

"Made by John Potts in 1830. Published by Potts, 
Oliver and Potts, Engravers, New Mills, Derbyshire." 

The printing is done in purple ink of a beautiful 
shade. There is much fancy work, such as scrolls, 
borders, etc., and it is of a very superior kind. It is 
evidently printed from a copper plate, or if from more 
than one, the union is so exact as not to be visible. 
Taken as a whole, it is a most artistic piece of work- 
manship, representing the best printing as well as en- 
graving of that day. 

"Black Jack", "Salmon Roe Jack"and "Hungry Bill" 
fished Lagunitas lake on Monday with indifferent suc- 
cess. Each angler used a boat and tried for fish from 
the shore, although trout were seen at various times in 
the water they were totally indifferent to any lures and 
every effort to hook them. Fishing in this lake is 
about over for the season it seems, as the lake has been 
pretty well fished out. "Black Jack" advances the 
following theory to explain why large fish are seldom 
caught in the lake. He claims wild cats and racoons 
are responsible for their absence. The montain brook 
which empties into the dammed up lake, being fed by 
springs here and there along its tortuous and narrow 
confined course adown the rocky slopes of Mount 
Tamalpais, is in many places but a foot or two in width 
where the water cuts between the rocks on its way to 
the reservoir. Trout will naturally leave a lake to go 
up a stream to spawn, the big fellows when they take 
to the brook are easily whipped out by the cats and 
coons, which have such easy access to the little stream 
that it is almost impossible for a fish to escape these, 
its natural enemies, which vermin abound in that par- 
ticular locality. 

The anglers were well provided with thirst preven- 
tatives which may possibly account for a ludicrous ad- 
venture which befell "S. R. Jack" on the Sausalito 
boat wheu the party returned to this city. When the 
fishe.'mon walked on board "S. R. Jack" deposited his 
rod, creel and other dunnage on the platform just 
under tho stairway inside the door on the lower deck. 
This practice is usual with shooters and anglers. The 
luggage generally remaining safely where placed until 
the boat reaches its city wharf. Shortly after the ferry 
boat left the Sausalito slip something happened to the 
steering gear, the boat being adouble-ender was simply 
turned around in her course and steamed ou, the 
other rudder being used instead of the disabled one. 
This reversal was noticed by "Black Jack" who shortly 
led "S. R. Jack" astern. It was not long before he 
missed his fishing tackle, etc. He insisted that he was 
either the victim of a practical joke or that some one 
had stolen his property. He fumed and fretted un ;il 
the boat was nearly. at the slip when he found his stuff 
forward. Even then he claimed that someone had 
maliciously carried his baggage from where he had 
first placed it. The moral of this story is obvious— 
Don't go fishing on a windy day, don't have codfish 
sandwiches in your lunch basket. 



July 6, 1901] 



11 



THE FARM. 



Dairying in Switzerland. 

My observation of the dairy business in 
Switzerland showed it to be rather a dif- 
ferent proposition from what it is here, 
says P. M. Sharpies in the New York 
Produce Review. The pastures are stood 
on edge rather than laid flat, as is the cus- 
tom in America. One edge of this pasture 
will be bounded by an eternal snow field 
and the other edge, but a comparatively 
short distance below, will be in the 
middle of the harvest field. One part of 
a man's herd will be drinking ice water 
ten feet from the edge of a glacier, while 
the other part will be munching fine, 
green pasture two hundred yards away. 

The Swiss cow is probably well known 
to all- a beautiful and gently, fawn-col- 
ored animal, looking something similar to 
a Jersey cow. These cows do not go down 
to the foot of the mountain every day, but 
remain high up in the pasture lands all 
seasons, stone huts with stone roofs being 
crowded on to some spot more level than 
others, where cows are kept at night. 

The milk is carried to the bottom in a 
wooden pail or carried strapped to the 
back of the milk man. The cheese and 
butter are made in a small way by each 
individual. The satisfaction I had and 
the meeting an-old-friend feeling which 
came over me can be understood on my 
coming occasionally to some inaccessible 
cow-house with a glacier for a refrigerator 
and a Sharpies separator for handling the 
milk. In some of the lower, less rugged 
mountain regions there are butter factor- 
ies where large quantities of milk are 
bought to be made into butter.; 

It is most interesting in some villages 
located in a wide, fertile valley, to watch 
the cows come home from the mountain 
foothills at night. They need no driver, 
but when the proper time comes the lead- 
ers start off for the village, and all the 
other cow's, sometimes hundreds in num- 
ber, follow them to the village. Each 
cow knows its own home and will walk 
up to the door of the home of the owner 
and stand there bawling until admitted. 
Apparently, it is let into the best room in 
the house — the family occupying the up- 
stairs and inferior rooms. Outside in the 
street is the manure pile, and Mark Twain 
informs us that each man's or family's 
wealth is indicated by the size of the 
manure pile at the front door. Perhaps 
this is true. I can not say. I vouch only 
for what I know, but the size of these 
manure piles would indicate that Mr. 
Twain was right. 



Smallest of Wild Cattle. 



Celebes lias the distiction of being the 
home of the smallest living representative 
of the wild cattle, or, indeed, of the wild 
cattle of any period of the earth's history, 
for no equally diminutive fossil member 
of the group appears to be known to 
science. An idea of the extremely dimin- 
utive proportions of the anoa or sapiutan, 
as the animal in question is respectively 
called by the inhabitants of Celebes and 
the Malays, may be gained when it is 
stated that its height at the shoulder is 
only about three feet three inches, whereas 
that of the great Indian wild ox, or gaur, 
is at least six feet four irches, and may. 
according to some writers, reach as much 
as seven feet. In fact, the anoa is really 
not much, if at all, larger than a well 
grown South Down sheep, and scarcely 
exceeds in this respect the little domesti 
cated Bramini cattle shown a few years 
ago at the Indian exhibition held at Earl's 
Court. 

The anoa has many of the characteristics 
of the Indian Buffalo, but its horns are 
relatively shorter, less curved and more 
upright. In this, as well as in certain 
other respects, it is more like the young 
than the adult of the last-named species, 
and as young animals frequently show an 
cestral features which are gradually lost 
as maturity is approached, it would be a 
natural supposition that the anoa is a 
primitive type of buffalo. 



Successful Creamery. 

The affairs of the Hollister Creamery 
are in an exceedingly prosperous condi. 
tion. The corporation has no debts what- 
ever, and during the year has expended 
about fifteen hundred dollars in new 
machinery and improvements. Two of 
the latest make of separators were pur- 
chased and paid for. The Creamery is 
now making up 40J pounds of butter per 
day, and needs at least half a ton daily to 
fill all orders received. Shipments are 
made daily to San Jose, Santa Clara, Gil" 
roy, Pacific Grove, Santa Cruz, Felton, 
Boulder Creek, Morgan Hill, Monterey 
and the New Idria Mines. So heavy is 
the local demand that there has been no 
butter to ship to the San Francisco mar- 
ket for some time. — Hollister Bee. 



The points of a good dairy cow are; 
Wide in shoulder blades, well filled be. 
hind shoulder blades ; wide, open nostrils; 
large forehead; prominent spine; deep 
and well sprung ribs; long muzzle; 
strong jaws; long, flat neck; sharp be- 
hind the wethers; long body; hips cup 
away, both behind and before; thin 
flanks; four well-developed milk wells 
just back of fore legs; udder well back; 
very little flesh on face and lower legs; 
veins in these places prominent; flat, 
thin leg bones ; harsh thin coat. 



A Sutter County Creamery. 

The daily supply of milk to the Tudor 
skimming station has now been increased 
to about 2000 pounds, and the patrons 
generally are well satisfied with the re- 
turns. Those who have made thorough 
tests of the profits before and after the 
skimming station was established find 
that they are doing far better now than 
when they made their own butter. AmODg 
those who are contemplating going into 
the business more extensively is A. Graf 
fis, who is making arrangements to secure 
from 75 to 100 head of good fresh cows 
and stock a po tion of the Ashford f arm. 
With, this addition and other increased 
herds the present supply to the station 
will be more than doubled.— Sutter Fur. 
frier. 

In an experiment in pig feeding it was 
found that when hard-wood ashes or bone 
meal was given with corn meal there was 
a gain of one pound in weight for less than 
five pounds of corn meal, while when the 
corn meal was fed alone it took over 634 
pounds of corn meal to make a pound of 
gain, or to be exact 4.87 pounds when 
ashes were given, 4.9 pounds with bone 
meal and ti.29 when corn meal was sole 
food. This is a saving of about 25 per 
cent by adding the mineral matter of 
ashes or bone meal. The bone meal 
should be mixed with the corn meal in 
the mash, but the ashes may be put in a 
clean place in the yard and the hog 
allowed to help himself. Whether they 
supply some need of the animal or act as 
a stimulant to better digestion is not yet 
known, and we care more for a knowledge 
of the facts than for a theory in regard to 
them. 

The grade Shropshire ewes of the west- 
ern ranges have one paramount virtue 
other than their excellence as mutton 
producers. They are prolific and excel- 
lent mothers. A Shropshire ewe will not 
only own her own lamb under difficult 
conditions and adopt any waif turned over 
to her with a suggestion that it is her own 
offspring, but she sometimes gives trouble 
by taking up with her neighbor's young 
before her own is born. Under the con- 
ditions of handling a range flock this in- 
stinct for maternity makes the Shrop a 
prime favorite. 

The best fertilizer for any soil is a spirit 
of industry, enterprise and intelligence. 
Without this, lime and gypsum, bones 
and green manure, marl and guano will 
be of little use. 



When to Shear. 



J. J. Edgar ton, in Farmer's Tribune, 
calls attention to the cruel practice still 
often followed of allowing the fleece to re- 
main on the sheep till late in June or 
July, the object being to increase its 
weight. He gives three reasons for shear- 
ing earlier in the season. First, cruelty 
to animals in compelling them to carry 
these heavy coats into the hot weather. 
Second, it is hard on the constitution and 
vitality of the sheep, will lessen its appe- 
tite and thrift, and in the case of ewes 
with lambs, the lambs will not do nearly 
as well. Third, the amount of wool is not 
increased, as has been supposed, by late 
shearing, but is generally lessened in both 
quality and quantity. If the shearing is 
done late, there is considerable time before- 
hand in which there is no growth ; the 
animal is too warm already, while if the 
shearing is done early there will be con- 
siderable time that nature will make the 
effort to replace the coat, and growth will 
be rapid. In this way a much greater 
growth of fiber in a year is secured. Mr. 
Edgarton considers it best to have shear- 
ing done before they go on to grass. With 
ewes he prefers to have the shearing done 
before lambing. The fleece will be in 
much better condition if taken off before- 
hand, and the lamb and ewe will both do 
better. 

For Good Mutton. 



For a good quality of mutton keep the 
ewes in thrifty condition, says the Farm 
Journal, but not overfat. Feed wheat 
bran with a little oatmeal, is a valuable 
ration for ewes, for it builds bone in the 
lamb, keeps the ewes' bowels free and 
open and tends to the production of milk 
after lambing. About one pound of grain 
to each ewe should be fed daily. 

When giving sulphur to the sheep it 
should be mixed with the salt, enough 
only to give the salt a slightly yellowish 
tinge. 

It is a waste of money to grind grain 
for sheep. Scatter the whole grain over a 
broad bottomed trough and let them work 
it out for themselves. Feed the corn on 
the ear. 

A strong taste is imparted to the mut- 
ton if the wool is allowed to touch the ex- 
posed flesh. Avoid this if you want a 
sweet leg of lamb. 

When we fatten sheep during winter, 
we usually shear them. They gain faster 
and take up less room in consequence* 
In this case, of coarse, they must be 
warmly housed, and it is of the utmost im- 
portance that the pens be well ventilated. 



For Milch Cows. 



The parsnip is probably one of the best 
roots ever grown for milch cows, and it 
has a great advantage in that it may re. 
main in the ground until spring, when 
other roots are all gone, and then be used 
until grass is grown. It is as easily 
grown as the carrot, and, like that root, 
it wants a deep, rich and mellow so 1. 
Many object to growing it, even in the 
garden, because the weeds are apt to get 
such a growth before the parsnips come 
up that the labor of weeding is greatly 
increased, but this may be remedied by 
mixing a few radish seed with the pars- 
nip seed, which will come out long before 
the parsnips are up. They can be pulled 
when the parsnips are thinned. 



The breeds used in the make up of the 
new Buff Orkingtons were the Ham- 
burgs, Dorkings and Buff Cochins. They 
take their great laying qualities from 
the Hamburgs. The Dorkings furnished 
meaty qualities, shape and blockiness and 
the Buff Cochin size and color. 

The farmer who has a milk check coming 
in every month will tell you that it is a 
great aid in producing sound and natural 
sleep, for it relieves the worry of how to 
meet the current expense bills for the 
household. 



The Florida Razorback. 



The Florida razorback is the hog in- 
digenous to this climate and soil. He is 
usually large of limb and fleet of foot, be- 
ing the only known porker that can out- 
run a darkey. He has a tail of wondrous 
length, which, while he is in active motion, 
he twists into the tightest corkscrew, but 
with which while quietly feeding he raps 
his leathery sides much in the same man- 
ner that the docile cow uses her tail. He 
is self supporting. He earns his own liv- 
ing, and thrives equally well >n the high- 
woods, in the flatwoods, in the hummocks 
and in the marshes. He subsists on any- 
thing he can find above the earth or 
underneath its surface. He has a clear, 
far-seeing eye and is very sensitive of 
hearing. Nature has equipped him with 
a snout almost as long as the beak of a 
wild pelican of Borneo, with which he can 
penetrate the earth many inches in quest 
of worms, snakes and insects. He is the 
most intelligent of all the hogs, and fs 
likewise the most courageous. He has 
been known to engage in mortal combat 
with a coon for the possession of a water- 
melon, and to rend asunder a barbed wire 
fence. 



There are five breeds of swine that have 
a reputation as bacon hogs in England 
They are the three Yorkshire breeds, 
large, middle and small, the Berkshire 
and the Tamworth. The large and middle 
Yorkshire are thought to be better than 
the Berkshire, the Tamworth and small 
Yorkshire not as good for furnishing 
bacon well mixed with lean meat. They 
are all rather short in head and neck in 
proportion to the length of body. To ob- 
tain bacon that will sell at the highest 
prices or nearly equal to the Danish bacon 
it would be necessary to resort to the Eng- 
lish system of feeding, using more barley 
and oat meal, and little or no American 
corn, which makes it too fat. They also 
feed many roots from the time the pigs 
are weaned until actually put up to fatten 
unless they have a clover field to turn 
into.. 

The tremendous lofses that are coming 
to some men right alongside other men, 
both keeping cows, is proof sufficient that 
what ails the losing man is a want of 
sound dairy knowledge. Every cow cen- 
sus we have taken shows up this fact 
very clearly. 



KENDALL'S SPAVIN CURE 




The old reliable remedy for Spattes, BlartOMf. Spllnu, 
Curbs and all forma of I<amonenH. Lt Cures without ablem. 
lab because it does not blister. 1'rleo $1, six for #5. Asa 
liniment for family use it has no equal. Ask your drug- 
gist for Kendall'n Npuvln Cure, also "A Treatise on 
the llorne." the hook free, or address 
DR. B. J. KENDALL CO., Kno.burir Full*, Vt. 



Turtle s Elixir 

has drawn tho following expressions of 
endorsement from Its grateful users In 
every state and terri- 
tory in the Union. 
Invaluable for man or beast 
Gives immediate relief. 
Unequalcd for Colic. 
Very satisfactory results. 
Best for Spavin. 
Shoe Boil removed. 
Wouldn't be without it. 
gy«, Never lost a hair. 
■T Saved a heap of money. 
Speedily relieves pain. 

$5000 REWARD 

for every oneof the above endorsements 
that can be proven spurious. 
Tuttle's Elixir tor use In the stable. 
T tittle's Family Elixir r i ii , in tin 
home. Roth are uuequaled remedies. Fifty 
cents buys cither at any drug store. Sam- 
ple free for flc in stamps— to pay postage. 
Used and endorsed by Adams Express Co. 

TUTTLE'S ELIXIR COMPANY. 
487 O'KarrellSt., Sun Fruiiclneo, Cat, 
Beware of all ao-caPed Elixirs, Done genuine but Tuttles 




12 



[July 6, 1901 



Are you testing those cows you are now 
milking? Do you know the "star boarder !" 
You wouldn't put up with a hired hand 
who failed to earn you a profit on his 
wages; then, why do you persist in throw- 
ing away valuable feed on an unprofitable 
cow? 



PRIVILEGES! 



FOR SALE. 



Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders 
Association. Race Meeting 

AT SACRAMENTO 

July 30 to Aug. 3, 1901, inclusive. 

Bids for the following privileges will be received 
up to noon, July 15, 1901: 

Betting Privilege (Book and Auction Pools) 

FRUIT, CANDY and Nl'TS, 

PROGRAMMES. 

A certified check for fifty per cent should accom- 
pany each bid. Right reserved to reject any or all 
bids. Address F. W. KELLEY, Sec'y. 

36 Geary St., San Francisco. 

GORDON SETTER PUPPIES 

FOR SALE. Thoroughbreds by a son of Dick III, 
winner at four bench shows in this city — out of 
Mlrza, winner at May Show, 1893. 
Address Owner, 1950 Grove St., Oakland, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

Handsome Brown Pacing Gelding, 

weight about 1000 pounds, solid color, seven years 
old, kind and gentle; can step a mile in 2:80 any 
day. Can't be beat for general qualifications as a 
gentleman's road horse. Is safe for a lady to 
drive. Address CHAS. CLINE, 2430 N Street 
Sacramento, Cal. 



VETERINARY. 



DR. J. B. BOOMER 

M. D. V., F. M. V. A. 

VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Late Professor of Medicine in McKillip Veterinary 
College at Chicago and assistant to M. N. 
McKillip of Chicago for seven years. 
Office and Infirmary— 510 Van Ness avenue, San 
Francisco. Cal. Phone: Mint 321. 



Ira Barker Dalziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carriage. Saddle and Road Horses for Sale 

Office and stable: 605 Golden Gate Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. Telephone South 651. 



H>i*. W xxx, 3F". Sgan. 

M. R. C. V. S., F. E. V. M. S. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edinburg 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspector forNew Zealand and Australian Colonies 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California; Ex-President of 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital, 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco: 
Telephone West 128. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



HOLsTEINS— Winners of every 7 days' butter 
contest at State Fair 1899 1st & 2d for aged cows, 
4-yr., 3-yr. and 2-yr.-olds; 21 Jerseys and Durhams 
competing. 5th year my Holsteins have beaten 
Jerseys for butter. Stock for sale; also pigs. F. 
H. Burke, 626 Market St., S. F. 

VERBA liUENA JERSEYS— The best A.J 
C. C. registered prize herd is owned by Henry 
Pierce, San Francisco. Animals for sale. 

JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND DURHAMS. 
Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1876. William Niles & Co. Los Angeles, 
Cal. 




The camp cook cannot spoil your coffee 
if you use 

INSTANTANEOUS 
COFFEE 

A teaspoonful dropped into hot water 
and it is ready to drink by adding sugar 
and milk. As delicious as if made by a 
French chef. 



If your grocer hasn't it, we will deliver 
free, anywhere east of the Mississippi, 
enough Instantaneous Coffee to make 100 
oups, on receipt of one dollar. 

NATIONAL FOOD C0HPANY, 

Camden, N. J. 



LOW 

Summer Excursion 
Rates East. 



Southern Pacific 

Offers those low round trip rates : 

ON SALE ROUND TRIP 

June 30»July I. Cincinnati, $76.50 

July 1-2 Detroit, 82.25 
July 3=4 ) 

August 22=23 [ Buffalo, 87.00 
September 5-6 ) 

July 8-9, Colorado Springs, 55.00 

July 17-18 Milwaukee, 74.50 

July 20-21 Chicago, 72.50 

August 20=21 Louisville, 77.50 

September 5=6 Cleveland, 82 50 

These rates apply from California main-line 
points. Many miles shortest— many hours fast- 
est—finest scenery— choice of routes— limited 
trains — personally conducted tourist excursions— 

ACROSS THE CONTINENT 

Details at nearest office 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 




Palace Hotel 



In placing these two hotels 
under one management and 
joining them with a covered 
passageway, the purpose was 
to provide guests with com- 
forts and conveniences not 
obtainable in any other hotel 
in the West. And the plan 
is a success. 

AMERICAN PLAN EUROPEAN PLAN 



Grand Hotel 





Richelieu (afe ma,^ 



Junction, t J5 tARNV . 



THOROUGHBREDS FOR SALE. 



The undersigned offers at private sale all the 
thoroughbred horses and mares on the well-known 
Sonoma Stock Farm owned by the late J. B. 
Chase. These are royally-bred producing stallions, 
mares, also colts and fillies, and all will be priced 
without reserve, and sold subject to the approval 
of the Court. For particulars and prices address 
J. B. Walden, Jr., Administrator Estate of J. B. 
Chase, 310 Pine street, San Francisco. 



TEAM FOR SALE 



XJANDSOME, STYLISH BLACK TEAM. 
xx Well matched, perfectly sound, ib% hands 
and weigh about 1050 each. Good gaited trotters 
and a high-class road team in every respect. To 
see team and for further particulars address 
E. P. LUCE, 280 S. First St. San Jose, Cal. 



Stallion Service Books 



ONE DOLLAR IN CASH 



At This Office. 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 

Imp. Hackney Stallion 
Green's Riifus 63 < 429l > 

Will serve a limited number of approved mares season 1901. 

FEE - $75 
Reductions made for two or more mares. 



'*"**********"*******■■*----- '■'■-■"■on nnan n_n_juuuumj 

A. CI1DOC Cm IMTC CniWIMI. Illltinniira. 



CURBS, SPLINTS, SPAVINS, W1NDPUFFS, 
— and all enlargements, absolutely removed by— 



LAME 

HORSES 

°*^sCURED v 



7<s> 



^QUINN'S 

Ointment. 

It has the unqualified endorsement of our leadr 
ing horse men and vete rinarian!, 

M*. C. E. DlNEBART, Caikler Stale Bank, 
Slayton, Minn., Bays: 
"One bottle cured a very bad case of blood spavin 
on a mare for which I have since been offered 8800. 
I would not be without it if it cost $5.uo a bottle." 
We have h tdrede of such temimoniaU, 

91.00 per package. Ask jour Druggist for It. If 
Be not keep it, we will Bend prepaid on receipt of price. 
AJdre.i M. B. EDDY A CO., W hltehall, N. Y. 



J T _ *aarai » . a. fclMI V d. to., M hltehall, >. Y. 




WEBSTER'S INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY 



NE.W EDITION JUST ISSUED 

NEW PLATES THROUGHOUT 
Now Added 25,000 NEW WORDS, Phrases, Etc. 
Rich Bindings ■* 2364 Pages * 5000 Illustrations 

Prepared under the supervision of W. T. Harris, Ph.D., LL.D., United States I 
Commissioner of Education, assisted by a large corps of competent specialists. 

BETTER THAN EVER FOR HOME. SCHOOL, AND OFFICE,. | 



urn 



Also Webster's Collegiate Dictionary with Scottish Glossary,. 
•* << First class in quality, second class in size. " Nicholas Murray Butler . 



Specimen pages, etc., of both books sent on application. 

G. & C. MERRIAM CO., Publishers, Springfield, NL..S., U. S. A. 



CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR FOR 1901. 
SACRAMENTO 

SEPTEMBER 2nd TO 14th, INCLUSIVE. 

ENTRIES TO CLOSE JULY 15, 1901. 

All Races to be contested at the State Fair on days to be here- 
after designated by the Board of Directors. 



The Vinctor Stake. 



The following Running .stakes will close August 3, 1901 , with the Secretary. 
Remainder of Running Program, for which Liberal Purses will be given, will be 
announced September 1st, and will provide for four or more Running Racrg each day : 

Finch Sllki 1 ' " r Ages. Entrance SMO, to accompany nomination; $20 addl- 
riasll olalxC. tional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. the day preceding the race: $400 
added by the Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third. Non-winners of three races this year, if 
three year olds and over, five pounds; non-winners of two races, seven pounds; and non-winners of one 
race, ten pounds. Maidens, three years old allowed five pounds; four years old and over, seven pounds 
additional. Six Furlongs. • 

Trip Qhnftpr <,>llin<r QfnlfP For Two Teur ()ld». Entrance «IO, to accom 

lut ouaiici oeilltlg oiarvc. pany nomination; $15 additional for colts not de- 
clared by -1 p. If. day preceding race; with $300 added by the Society, of which $50 to second and $35 to 
third. Horses may be entered not to be sold, and carry rule weight. If entered to be sold for $1000, 
allowed three pounds; $700, six pounds; $400, ten pounds. Winnersof one race after closing of stake to 
carry three pounds extra; of two or more, seven pounds extra. Maidens beaten three times, allowed 
live pounds; four or more, seven pounds. Value to be placed on starters through entry box by 4 p. K. 
day before race. Six Furlongs. 

Sacramento State Fair Selling Stake. wa ;, Th Tnt™nc r e ™&"*JS&. 

pany nomination; $20 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. M. the day preceding the race: $400 
added by the Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third. Winner to be sold at auction. If for 
$■■2000 to carry rule weight; if for less, one pound allowed on each $100 to $1000, thence two pounds for 
each $K)u to $400. Selling price to be placed on starters through entry box by 4 P. M. on the day pre- 
ceding the race. A winner of a stake race or three or more races of any value after closing of stake, 
to carry five pounds extra. Maidens allowed seven pounds. One Mile. 

For Three Tear Olds and upwards Entrance * I ». to 
accompany nomination: $20 additional for horses not declared by 
4 p. M. day preceding race: with $400 added by the Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third. 
Stake to be named after winner if Vinctor's time (1:40) is beaten. A non-winner of a stake raoe in 
1901, or a race of the value of $500, allowed, if a non-winner of Ave races other than selling races, five 
pounds. Maidens seven pounds additional. One mile. 

c |mnv Clnn*» ^tntp F ' or Two Tear Old Filllos Entrance 810, to accompany 
OUIIIIV . lope OlttKC. nomination; $15 additional if not declared by 4 p. m. the day pre- 
ceding the race; $300 added by the Society, of which $50 to second and $25 to third. Weights five 
pounds below the scale. A winner of a stake race in 1001, or a winner of three or more races of any 
value, other than selling races, five pounds extra. Non-winners of two races allowed four pounds. 
Maidens allowed seven pounds, and if such are the produce of a mare that has not produced a winner 
at the time of starting, ten pounds. Maidens beaten three or more times since closing of the stake, 
allowed five pounds, and if not placed second or third, seven pounds additional. Five furlongs. 

Tho nni/prnnr'c C<«l- P A Handicap for Three Tear Old. and upwards. 
1 IIC UUVC111UI 3 OldtVC. Entrance SIO, to accompany nomination, with $20 addi- 
tional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. day preceding race; with $400 added by the Society, of which 
$70 to second and $30 to third. Weights posted at 12 M. day preceding race. A winner of a race other 
than a selling race, after the weights are published, to carry five pounds extra. One mile and a 
furlong. 

The California State Fair Annual Stake. ^mSSJSSSS'.Z'Z 

company nomination; $20 additional for horses not declared by 4 P. M. the day preceding the raoe; 
with $500 added by the Society, of which $100 to second and $50 to third. Weights posted by 12 M. day 
preceding race. A winner of a race, other than a selling race, after the weights are published, to 
carry five pounds extra. Six furlongs. 

TtlA PrpcifiAnt'c QtnlrA A Handicap for Three Tear Olds and TJpwarda. 
1 IIC rl CS1UCI11 a OiaiYC. Entrance »15. to accompany nomination; with $25 addi- 
tional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. day preceding race; $500 added by the Society, of which $10n 
to second and $50 to third. Weights posted by 12 m. day before race. A winner of a raoe other than a 
selling purse, after the weights are published, to carry five pounds extra. One and one-quarter miles. 

The State Agricultural Society's rules to govern except where conditions are otherwise. All 
declarations and claims for allowances due at 4 p. u. day preceding race, unless otherwise specified 
in conditions. Owners and trainers will be held responsible for same. Entrance and declaration 
money to go to winner. No added money for less than four starters in different interests. In selling 
races, beaten horses not liable to claim. Right to use starting gate is reserved. 

Entries must state name, color, sex and pedigree of the horse, with racing colors of the owner. 



GEO. XV. JACKSON, Secretary California State 
Agricultural Society, Sacramento, Cal. 



A. B. SPKECKELS, President. 



July 6, 1901] 



13 



Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association, 

Race Meeting Sacramento, July 30 to August 3, 1901, inclusive. 



CLASSES THAT ARE FILLED. 

TUESDAY, JULY 30—2:40 Class Trotting Stakes, $1000. 2:25 Class Pacing Stakes, $1000. 
WEDNESDAY, JULY 31—2:13 Class Pacing Stakes, $1000. 
THURSDAY, AUGUST 1—2:14 Class Trotting Stakes, $1000. 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 3—2:20 Class Trotting Stakes, $1000. 2:17 Class Pacing Stakes, $1000. 



ADDITIONAL GUARANTEED STAKES. 

ENTRIES TO CLOSE MONDAY, JULY 15, 1901. 



No. 12—2:20 Class Pacing 

No. ] 3— 2:12 Class Pacing 

No. 14 — Free-for-all Pacing 

No. 15 — Three-year-olds .Pacing 



$400 
.$500 
.$600 
$300 



No. 7—2:27 Class Trotting $400 

No. 8—2:17 Class Trotting $500 

No. 9—2:12 Class Trotting $500 

No. 10— Free-for-all Trotting $600 

No. 11— Three-year-olds Trotting $300 

No. 16 — Double Team Race, trotters and pacers, eligible 2:20 Class, mile and repeat $250 

No. 17 — Two-mile Dash, trotters and pacers, eligible to any class $200 

Also races for members of Golden Gate Park Driving Club and races for roadsters, trotters and 
pacers owned in Sacramento County. 

N. B. It is not the intention of the management to give any special races at this meeting and if you want to start your horses they must be entered in the 
regular advertised events. 

For conditions see Entry Blanks. 

E. P. HEALD, President. F. W- KELLEY, Secretary. 

36 deary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



10 WARREN STREET, NEW YORK. 



The 0. K, celebrated $40 TRACK 
HARNESS beats them all. Known 
over the country for its Finish, Quality 
, and Durability. Moffatt Leather and 

L Rawhide lined, in gilt, rubber or silver | 



J. O'KANE 

THE LARGEST DEALER IN 

TURF GOODS 

In the United States. 



Try the wonderful 0. K. PASTE for 
Cracked Heels, Scratches and Galls 
of all kinds. Samples FREE. 
. HORSE BOOTS! New Patterns! New 

L Prices! New Styles. Write for catalog 



PROF. ROBIQUET'S GREAT DISCOVERY. 



Manufacturers of 



Fine Carriage and Light Harness. 



SUNDRIES OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS.' 




26 and 28 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO. 

S. TOOMEY & CO.'S. 

Record Breaking 

SULKIES, JOG CARTS, PNEUMATIC ROAD WAGONS, and SPEED 
POLES embody all the Latest Improvements. 

BALL BEARINGS ARE DUST AND WATERPROOF. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 

O'BRIEN & SONS, Acts., 

Cor. Polk and Golden Gate Ave., SanJFranclgco, Cal. 




11 



[July fi, 1901 



Greatest Auction Sale of the Year! 



ON THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1901, 



I WILL SELL 



50 Standard-Bred Trotters and Pacers 

From the Oakwood Park Stock Farm, Danville, Cal. 



This consignment consists of thoroughly broken sons and daughters of Steinway 2:23*. Charles 
Derbv Kl Mcntnn 2 03, Dan L. 2:28?*, Prince Red, Major Ban. etc , out of many of the best bred 
marcs on this famous farm. There are several well-matchod, stylish carriage horses as well as fast 
road tenuis among them, besides standard mares and two very well bred stallions, also brothers and 
sisters to 'noted campaigners. Catalogues issued Monday next Anyone in need of a first-class 
•racinc Drosnect." a perfectly gentle roadster that has size, color and speed, or is in need of a tine 
Msines-s horse, should attend this sale. Horses will beat my place three days prior to the date of 

WM, G. LAYNG, Auctioneer, 

OCCIDENTAL HORSE EXCHANGE, 721 Howard St., near Third. 



busine 
sale, July 11th 



Breed to the Champion of the World. 
McKINNEY 2:11 1-4 

By Alcyone, dam Rosa Sprague (grandam of Fereno 3) 
2:10><) by Gov. Sprague. 

By the percentage of his performers in the 2:15 list McKlnney is the 
champion sire of the world. At 13 years of age he has 30 stand- 
ard performers, one-half of which are in the 2:15 list. 

A Race Horse- Himself. 

He started in 28 races, won 25 of them.was twice second 
and once third. 

He is a Sire of Race Horses. 

Every one of his get in the 2:20 list secured the record 
in a race, and all are race winners. 

He is a champion in the slvow ring, champion on the race 

track and a champion in the stud. 
In 1900 his get won first, second and fourth money in the Pacific 
Breeders Futurity, first and second money in the Occident Stake 
and first, second and third money in the Stanford Stake. The 
McKinneys are stake winners. Will make the season of 1901 at 

SAN JOSE RACE TRACK. 

gg — 86 Beginning Feb. 1st. until further notice. 

Terms for the Season $100 (Wlth usual return privileges). 

Qood pasturage for mares at $4 per month. For further particulars, address 

33 Mnenolia Avenue, San Jose, Cal. Tel. Green 393. C 



McKINNEY 2:11* 

sire of 

Coney 2:02 S£ 

Jennie Mac. 2:09 

Hazel Kinney 2:09),( 

Zolock 2:10^ 

Zombro 2:11 

You Bet 2:12H 

McZeus 2:13 

Dr. Book 2:13!< 

Osito 2:13!4 

Juliet D 2:13V4 

McBriar 2:14 

Harvey Mac 2:UK 

Geo. W. McKinney . . . 2:14H 

McNally 2:15 

Monica 2:15 

and 15 more in 2:30 



DURFEE 



SPOKANE INTERSTATE FAIR. 



$10,000 
IN PURSES. 



SPOKANE, WASH. 



$10,000 
IN PURSES. 



SEPTEMBER 10TH TO 21S T INCLUSIVE. 

The ROYAL ITALIAN BAND, one of the Greatest Musical Organizations in the country, has been 

secured at a cost of $5500. 



Entries to Harness Events close July 25, I90I. 



Entries to Running Races close on Night Before Race at 6 o'clock, 



SKPTEMKER 10— TUESDAY. 
Stock Parade. 1 :30 P. M. sharp. 

No. 1— Two-year-old Pacing S3110 

No. 2—3:22 Ol»«a Pacing; 4t ° 

No. 8— Banning. Half-mile dash. Handicap ISO 

No. 4 — Banning. One mile dash. Selling. MOO. 

W eight for age. Five pounds off for each 

S10O down to *200 2I>0 

SEPTEMBER 11— WEDNESDAY. 

5— 2:30 Class Pacing »400 

6— 2:30 Class Trotting 400 

7— Running. Fi ve-elghts mile dash . Handicap. 
Two years old ISO 

8— Hurdle Race. One and one-fourth miles. 
Four hurdles. Handicap 400 

SEPTEMBER 12— THURSDAY. 

9— 2:20 Class Trotting OlOOO 

10— 2:BOClass Pacing 2!iO 

No. 11— Running. Half mile and repeat Selling, 

(MOO. Weight for age. Five pounds off 

for each #100 down to 8100 2O0 

No. 12— Running. One mile dash. Handicap 350 



No 
No. 
No. 

No. 



No 
No 



SEPTEMBER 1 3 — FRIDAY. 

No. 13— Two-year-old Trot »400 

No. 14— Three-year-old and under. Trotting 300 

No. 15 — Ruunlng. Seven-eighths mile dash. Sell- 
ing, 8400. Weight for age. Five pounds 

off for each 8100 down to 81O0 200 

No. 16 Running. Three-eighths mile dash. Han- 
dicap 160 

SB PTE MB KB 1 4 — SATURDAY. 

No. 17—2:17 Class Trotting 8600 

No. 18 — Gentlemen's Driving Race to wagon. 
Owners to drive. Trotters eligible to 2:35 

class. First prize Cup 

Second prize Lap robe 

Third Prize Whip 

No. 19— Running Spokane Derby. One and one- 
half miles for three-year-olds 500 

No. 20 — Running Half mile and repeat. Handicap. 200 

SEPTEMBER 16— MONDAY. 
No. 2 1 —Gentlemen's Driving Race to wagon. 

Owners to drive. Pacers eligible to 2:30 

class. First prize Cup 

Second prize Lap robe 

Third prize Whip 

CONDITIONS. 



No. 22— Free for all. Slow race. Mile dash 850 

No. 33— Newsboys' Race. Half mile dash 25 

SEPTEMBER 17— TUESDAY. 

No. 24— 3 :35 Class Trot 8300 

No. 25— Three-year-old Pacing 2BO 

No. 36— Speoial Indian Race 100 

SEPTEMBER 18— WEDNESDAY. 

No. 2 7— Free-for-all Trotting 8500 

No. 28— 2 :24 Cla-S Trot 400 

No. 29— Running. Half mile dash. Washington 
and Idaho horses, owned in thege Stateg 

January 1 , 1 901 175 

No. 30— Running, Quarter mile dagh. Weight 

for age 10O 

SEPTEMBER 19— THURSDAY. 

No. 31—2:15 Class Pace 810O0 

No. 32—3:50 Class Trot 350 

No. 33— Running. Three-fourths mile dash. Han- 
dicap , 2O0 

No. 34— Running. Half mile dash. Horses owned 

In Spokane County, Jan. 1, 1901 150 



Entrance Fee. 5% of purse and 5% additional from money winners. 

Entrance to Harness Races payable at time of entry. Two horses may be entered from the same 
stable in the same class and held but for one entry: horse to be named the day before the race. Money 
to be divided as follows in harness races: 50%, 25%, 15% and 10%. Mile heats 3 in 5, except Nos. 1, 13, 
14 and 25, which are 2 in 3. Money in running races to be divided: 70%, 20% and 10%. 

Hopples are not barred. The Board reserves the right to declare off and return entrance fee in 



any purse that does not fill satisfactorily. A horse distancing the field is entitled to first and fourth 
monies only, and in no other case will a horse be entitled to more than one money. The usual weather 
clase will be observed. 

Other than specified, the rules of the National Trotting Association will govern. The rules of 
the California Jockey Club will govern the running races. 



For Entry Blanks, address H. BOLSTER, Secretary, Spokane, Wash. 



Or BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, San Francisco, Cal 




Send For Our Large Catalogue; Mailed Free. 



Triple Pump 




Centrifugal Pumps 

We carry Gasoline Engines 1V4, 2!>, 
5, 8 and 12 Horse Power 
«S"SEND FOR CATALOGUE 



Horse Power Irrigating Pump 



GEM 
STEEL 
WIND 
MILL 



k LITTLE 



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Dealers and Jobbers in 

PUMPS 



For Hand, Windmill, Irrigating, 
Spraying, Ship, Koad, Wine, 
Whitewashing, Fire Purposes, 
Power Purposes, Air Purposes, 
Pumps for every conceivable use 
and for all depths of wells. 




W« have the 
GEM with 
Graphite Hoxcs 
Never requiring 
Oiling 



Gasoline Engines, 

Windmills, Tanks, 

Morse Powers, Road Pumps, Hose, 
Brass Goods, Pipe Fittings, Tools, 
Lawn flowers, IRON PIPE, etc., etc. 



Webster Gasoline Engines 



M, 12 Horse Power. 



July 6, 1901] 



15 



NUTWOOD WILKES 22216 

The Champion Sire of Early and Extreme Speed. 

He is the ODly stallion whoever produced two three-year-olds in one season with 
records of 2:13 and H:l't\i respectively. Who I« It is the champion three-year- 
old gelding of the world, and last year reduced his record to 2:10!^. John A McKer- 
ron 2:10 holds the champion stallion record to wagon in a race. 

NUTWOOD WILKES will make the season of 1901 at the 

NUTWOOD STOCK FARM, from Feb. 15th to July 1st. 



By Guy Wilkes 2:151, 

Dam Lida W. 2:18| by Nutwood M8| 



Fee = $50 



For the Season 



With return privileges 
if horse remains my 
property. Good pastur- 
age at $3 per month. 
Bills payable before re- 
moval of mare. Stock 
well cared for. but no re- 
sponsibility assumed for 
accidents and escapes. 



NUTWOOD WILKES 2216, Race Rec. 2:16 1-2 



is the sire of 



John A. McKerron 2:10 

Ch. Stallion-Race Rec 
Matinee rec (wagon) .2:00 
3-year-old race rec...2:12j^ 

Who Is It 2:V)\4 

3-year-old race rec. .2:12 

Georgie B 2:12Vf 

Claudius 2:13S4 

Bob Ingersoll 2:14% 

Irvington Boy 2:17% 

Young stock by Nutwood Wilkes for sale. 

For further particulars apply or address 

MARTIN CARTER, 

Nutwood Stock Farm, Irvington, Alameda Co., Cal 



Irvington Belle 2:l8 l /4 

Echora Wilkes 2:18V4 

Central Girl 2:32*4 

Wilkes Direct 2:22*4 

Alix B 2:24*4 

Who Is She 2:25 

Fred Wilkes 2:26*4 

Queen C 2:28*4 

Electress 2:38*4 

Daugestar 3:39 




The Latest 
and Best 



McMURRAY 




and Hat I nee Driving 
PRICE RIGHT., 

NEW 



POINTS 

*1 

Perfect Construction, 
Light Weight. 
Great Strength, 
Easy Running 
and Built Right. 
IPRICESJ RIGHT. 

STYLES FOR 1901. 



New Spring Styles 



•IN- 



Highest perfection in mechanical skill and design, and the best part— Our Prices Are Right. 

PNEUMATIC SULKIES -TWO STYLES. 

The only sulky made that can be lined up on the race track without the aid of a bikeman, The 
only tool required being a monkeywrench 

The onlv Jog Cart that will giye you a straight pull on your horse when speeding. No better 
made. 

Gentlemen's Pneumatic Runabouts for fancy driving, also with solid rubber tires, and Pneumatio 
Speed Wagons. 

Send for Catalogues. 

KENNEY BICYLCE CO., 



531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Pacific Coast Agts. 



Pedigrees Tabulated 



and type written ready for framing 
Write for prices. -Breeder and 
Sportsman, 36 Geary street, San Francisco, Cal. 




Absorbine 



REMOVES 

Capped Hock, 
Thoroughpin, 
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16 



[July 6, 1901 




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VOL. XXIX. No. 2. 
36 GEARY STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1901. 



SUBSCRIPTION 
THREE DOLLARS A YEAR 



California Horses Over East. 



There were two meetings in which California horses 
stai-ted last week, one at Pekin, Illinois, the other at 
Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

At the Pekin meeting, which opened July 2d, Tags 
was a starter in the 2:13 class pace on the opening day- 
There was a drizzling rain and the track was not in 
condition for racing, but two races were finished in the 
mud and a couple of heats of the 2:13 pace. Tags won 
a heat and third money in this race, which finally went 
to the mare Carmelita by Cornelius, the fastest heat 
being 2:14}. Carmelita was bred at Rancho del Paso, 
and the time made in this race just equals her record 
made at Lexington in 1899. The McKinney gelding 
You Bet took fourth money in this race. Two heat s 
were paced on Tuesday^t^e 2d, there was no racing on 
Wednesday owing to the rain, and the race was con- 
cluded on Thursday. , 

In the 2:25 pace on the last named day Dr. Boucher's 
Harry Logan won in straight heats, the time being 
2:15}, 2:15J and 2:15f . There were five starters and 
Harry Logan won as he pleased. 

On Friday B. O. Van Bokkelen's Vic Shellar was the 
only California horse to start and he made a poor 
showing being last in the field of five that started. 
The heats of this race which was for 2:20 trotters were 
all close together, the fastest being 2:154 an( l the slow- 
est 2:16}. 

On the last day of the Pekin meeting C. E. Clark 
won the 2:24 class trot in straight heats with Sue by 
Athadon, defeating among others the horse A. J. D. 
that won this week at Windsor. Sue trotted a splen- 
did race, putting in her heats in 2:14|, 2:14} and 2:14} 
and she is very likely to be in the 2:10 class by the 
close of the season. On the same day the free for all 
pacers made a sensational race. There were four 
starters. Little Boy, the sensational horse of last 
year, was the winner, and won the first, second and 
fourth heats in 2:07.}, 2:07} and 2:10. Major Muscovite 
won the third heat in 2:09$ and then Little Boy and 
Edith W. had a ding dong finish in the last heat, 
Little Boy beating the mare by a narrow margin. 

At Minneapolis W. G. Durfee started his horse Dr_ 
Shorb on the first day of the meeting in the 2:30 class 
trot, and he finished second in each of the three heats. 
The winner was the mare Meta Arthur and she put 
her heats in 2:16k 2:16 and 2:15}. There were seven 
starters in this race and Dr. Shorb was a close second 
each time. The Colorado horse Winfield Stratton by 
Saraway won the 2:22 class pace in straight heats, each 
being in the good time of 2:14}. 

On the second day of this meeting Durfee started 
Charlie Mac, and Morehead started Maggie McKinney 
in the 2:18 trot. Charlie Mac was first in every heat, 
the time being 2:19}, 2:17} and 2:19.}. Maggie Mc- 
Kinney won fourth money in thi9 race. 

There was a heavy rain July 4th which prevented 
racing at Minneapolis on that day, and on the 5th the 
track was very heavy. Durfee managed to win the 
2:30} pace with Floretta Belle by State of Maine, taking 
the second, third and fourth heats with her. The best 
time was 2:21. The 2:13 pace on the same day had the 
mare Queen K. 2:12}, by Redondo as a starter. She 
got third money. The best time in the race was 2:16 
made by Dick Turpin in the second heat. 

The last day at Minneapolis was not a satisfactory 
racing day as there was a heavy wind and a poor track. 



Will Durfee started two horses, Dr. Book by McKinney 
and Silver Coin by Steinway, but owing to the fact 
that he had to ship the same day to Windsor he drew 
both horses after each had won a heat. Dr. Book took 
the first heat of his race in 2:16.1 and Silver Coin won 
his heat of the pace in 2:1!). Durfee probably got a 
good cut out of both purses by withdrawal. 

The Windsor meeting opened Monday, July 8th. 
Windsor is just across the river from Detroit and many 
of the California stables which will start at the Detroit 
meeting have been entered there. 

According to the dispatches James Thompson started 
Captain Goodall's four year old pacer Rajah in the 
2:30 pace on the opening day but was outside the 
money, finishing last. This race was taken by Star 
Pugh in straight heats, the time being 2:12a, 2:12.1 and 
2:12j, a fast race for green horses: 

Charlie Mac had to be content with second money in 
the 2:17 trot, which also came off the first day at 
Windsor. The race went to Metallas, a son of Mam- 
brino King that is expected to trot in 2:06 or better 
this year, so the showing of Charlie Mac was a very 
good one, as the heats were 2:13|, 2:12$ and 2:142- 

None of the California horses started on Tuesday, 
the second day. A. J. D. won the 2:25 trot, best time 
2:16}; John H. captured the 2:21 pace his best mile be- 
ing 2:15}. The 2:12 trot went to Cornelia Belle 2:11J 
by Onward. Her best mile in the race was in 2:12} and 
she won in straight heats. 

The racing at Windsor on Wednesday was sensa- 
tional, the pacer Dan Patch, a son of the mighty Joe 
Patchen 2:01}, taking the 2:15 pace in straight heats 
in the remarkable time for this season of the year, 
2:07$, 2:10 and 2:09. That good Colorado horse, Wini- 
fred Stratton by Saraway, that defeated everything 
he met at Denver and Minneapolis, was second to Dan 
Patch in this race. None of the California horses met 
Dan Patch in this race and he is not among the orig- 
inal entries in the Hotel Normandie 2:09 pace at De- 
troit, in which Goshen Jim and Rey Direct are both 
named, and which is set down for Thursday of next 
week. Dan Patch is a five year old stallion by Joe 
Patchon out of Zelica by Wilkesberry, a son of Young 
Jim. He started a green horse last year, and won 
every one of the four races in which he started, losing 
but one heat during the season and took a record of 
2:16. He will be a 2:04 horse this year in the opinion 
of those who have seen him at work. 

In the 2:09 pace on Wednesday at Windsor, White 
Hose, a ten year old mare that took a record of 2:08.1 
last year won, Sidney Pointer, a son of Star Pointer, 
being second, Goshen Jim third and Roy Direct fourth- 
Daisy J., a mare that took a record of 2:08$ last year, 
was fifth. The brief dispatch that was sent over the 
wires by the Associated Press, stated that Whito Hoso 
won in three straight heats, but as the time of four 
heats is given, and Sidney Pointor placed second in the 
summary, it is probable that he won the first heat- 
The time of the four heats given was 2:09} , 2:12, 2:11 
and 2:11}, a warm clip for the first race of the season 
for the California horses and their showing was not 
bad considering the circumstances. They will have to 
meet Whito Hose and Sidney Pointer again in the 
2:09 pace next Thursday at Detroit, but will not go 
against Dan Patch as ho is named in the Wayne Hotel 
Purse for pacers of , the 2:14 class which is on the pro- 
gram for Wednesday, and to which neither is eligible. 
The latest news we have from Windsor up to the 



*ime of going to press is a brief telegraphic account oi 
Thursday's races. The first race of the day was the 
2:14 trot, which was won by Gunsaulus, a son of the 
Electioneer horse Sphinx. He won the first, third and 
fourth heat, and as Dr. Book is placed second in the 
brief summary it is probable that the son of McKinney 
won the second heat. The fastest heat of the race 
was 2:14}. Our Lucky, in the stable of A. W. Brunei- 
was fourth. 

The 2:25 pace on the same day went to Billy H. In 
three straight heats after Mr. Bruner's horse Stanton 
Wilkes by Nutwood Wilkes had won the first heat. It 
is stated that the fastest heat of the race was 2:10]. 

Ida Highwood a bay mare by Highwood, a son of 
Nutwood, won the 2:30 trot off the reel, her fastest, 
mile being in 2:13$. This mare took a record of 2:22', 
last year. Nono of the California horses started in this 
race. 

Next week we will publish the tabulated summaries 
of the Windsor meeting. 

Cleveland Track Notes. 



[American Sportsman, July 4.] 

In addition to giving Lucille a fast mile, "Doc" Tan- 
ner was also out with Texana and Mabel Onward, 
breezing each a mile in 2:14. 

Cresceus took a little slow work, being given four 
miles, grading from 2:50 to 2:18. He also gave Crescent 
Route, the three year old son of Cresceus, a half in 
1:10}. 

George Saunders stepped Arch W. in 2:16, his fastest 
mile this season. Algoneta, Jim Thompson's green 
California mare, who has been nominated for the M. 
and M., stepped the mile in 2:17}. 

Lord Derby was out and, guidod by Geers, moved a 
mile in 2:16. Geers also drove the green pacer Diamond 
King by Mambrino King a mile in 2:18, last quarter in 
31 seconds, Ben White alongside with The Aristocrat 
by Athanio. 

Mr. Louis Streuber, of Erie, Pa., was here Friday to 
see Millard Saunders work out his two horsos, both of 
whom having been laid up with colds. Eula Mac 
worked nicely in 2:19, while the roan pacer Funston 
showed a quarter in 32 seconds. 

Miles in bettor time than 2:15 are now of frequent 
occurrence at the Glenville track, several such being 
stepped Tuesday morning when over one hundred 
horses were given their work. Zarina 2:13:} by Dexter 
Princo, driven by Millard Saunders, and Lucille, the 
famous matinee mare, and Metallas 2:18.}, the groat 
young son of Mambrino King, carried off the honors 
among tho trotters, while Hetty G. 2:05$, Goshen Jim 
2:10} and Emma M. 2:12i{ showed tho fastest miles of 
tho pacing brigade. 

Tho pacer that beats Hotty G. this year will cer- 
tainly tako off the big end of tho purse, for the mare 
is working splendidly. Tuesday, driven by Scott Mc- 
Coy, she paced a mile in 2: KM, the last half being In 
1:03}. tholast quarter in 30<1 seconds, repeating in 2:12j. 
the last eighth being in 14i{ seconds. Goshen Jim 
stepped a mile easily in 2:11$, tho last quarter being in 
30$ seconds. Emma M., who will meet Lolita iu a 
match race at Glonvillo at tho Grand Circuit mooting, 
also worked out in 2:11$ or 1} seconds better than her 
record. 

Zarina 's mile was, however, the most remarkable 
performance of the day, as it was the second fastest 
mile trotted on any track this year, having been ex- 
celled only by The Abbot's 2:09} last Thursday. Her 
time by quarters was 0:33, 1:05$, 1:38$, 2:10$. Only a 
few minutes later "Doc" Tanner brought out Lucille 
and sent her a mile in 2: 1 ()■{ . The quarters were almost, 
identical with Zarina's, being 0:32}, 1:05}, 1:38$, 2:10j 
Metallas, the handsome Mambrino King stallion, for 
whom an offer of $10,000 has been refused, was driven 
by Charles Bid ridge in 2:12. A. W. Brunei- drove 
Harry Madison, his M. and M. candidate, in 2:15!. 
Mr. Brunei- has also driven Our Lucky in 2:15 and 
Staunton Wilkes in 2:141. 



[July 13, 1901 



JOTTINGS. m 



THE GRAND CIRCUIT will open on Monday next, 
July 15th, at the famous track at Detroit, Michi- 
gan, and there is every promise of it being a record 
breaker for the number of extremely fast trotters and 
pacers that will be seen in the races during the week. 
The two principal events of the meeting will be the 
Merchants and Manufacturers Stake of $10,000 for 
trotters of the 2:24 class, and the Chamber of Com- 
merce Stake of $5000 for 2:24 class pacers. These 
stakes have very large entry lists and it is probable 
that 2:10 will be beaten in both. It has been customary 
in the past to place the Chamber of Commerco on the 
program for the first day of the meeting and that rule 
will again be followed this year. Among the Cali- 
fornia horses that will probably start in this race are 
Harry Logan, the colt belonging to Dr. Boucher of 
San Jose, that paced to a record of 2:12J at Denver and 
has shown his ability to cover a mile better than 2:10; 
Stanton Wilkes, a son of Nutwood Wilkes, owned by 
A. W. Bruner of Los Angeles, that has worked a mile 
in 2:14 this year; Rajah, the Chas. Derby colt that 
worked a mile in 2:13 as a three year old last year and 
was purchased this spring by Captain Goodall of this 
city. Rajah started at Windsor this week, but was 
outside the money in a race won by Star 1'ugh, an 
entry in the Chamber of Commerce, in 2:121, 2:121 and 
2:12f. These three are the only California horses 
named in this race. Plenty, a bay gelding by Superior, 
that is entered, won a race at Pekin, 111,, last week in 
straight heats, one of which was in 2:12J. It will be 
seen that three of the Chamber of Commerce entries, 
viz: Harry Logan, Star 1'ugh and Plenty havo won 
races during the last four weeks, beating their fields 
in straight heats, and getting records of 2:12 and a 
fraction. There wero 2(5 original entries to the race 
and it is very likely a large field will go to the post, as 
is generally the case where big money is at stake. 
On form as displayed up to this time, I hardly expect 
Stanton Wilkes nor Rajah to be good enough to get 
inside the money if they start, but Harry Logan should 
be one of the first four and if he can show the speed he 
did in his work at San Jose should be close to the 
winner. The race will test the staying powers of the 
horses that start in it. Bonnie Direct was the winner 
of first money in this race last season. He was doubt- 
ess laid up the first three heats, as he was !>, 5 and 8 ) 
respectively in those heats, and won the next three. 
The time of the six heats was 2:101, 2:12], 2:13J, 
2:13, 2:12} and 2:12}, a pretty hot clip for a biff field of 
2:24 class pacers to take. 

The M. & M. had three fast California bred trotters 
named among the original entries this year — Algonetta 
owned by A. L Mulcahey of this city, Harry Madison 
owned by A. W. Bruner of Los Angeles and the black 
mare Eleata, bred at Palo Alto and now the property 
of Maplewood Farm, New Hampshire. Algonetta has 
worked in 2:14 this year and Harry Madison has 
shown two heats of a workout in 2:14 and 2:15. Eleata 
is credited with a mile very close to 2:12. The fastest 
of the six heats required to decide the M. & M. last 
year was 2:14:} and unless the class is faster than that 
this year the California mares should be up in the 
money. I am of the opinion, however, that the heats 
will be around 2:10 and 2:12 this year and if a big field 
starts it will require a horse to beat 2:13 three times to 
win. The bay gelding A. J. D. by Anderson Wilkes, 
entered in this stake, won at Windsor last Tuesday in 
three straight heats and boat the three horses that 
started against him in a rather easy manner in 2:18, 
2:16] and 2:10}, which shows him to be a pretty good 
one for this time of the year. There are some highly 
touted trotters among the entries, the mares Rose by 
Alcazar and Neva Simmons by Simmons being among 
those that are credited with verv fast trials. Out of 
the 31 original entries the field should be as large as 
the one which started last year, when ten horses took 
the word in the first heat. The race was won by Lady 
Gerald ine, a mare by Constantine that took a record 
of 2:11] a month later at Glens Falls. 

Besides the horses from California named in these 
two big stakes, there are a number of higher clas s 
ones that have been named in the faster races. The 
$2500 2:14 trot will have Dr. Book, Janice and Bob 
Ingersoll as starters if they are right, and the 2:09 
pace for $2500 has Goshen Jim and Rey Direct entered. 
There are several California horses entered in the 
regular purse races which closed last mouth and it is 
very likely that they will make a good showing, a 8 
nearly all of those that were taken East have been 
showing well in their work and races. 



Unless the shadows of coming events are not to be 
depended upon there will be few processions in the 
races that are decided at the Breeders meeting at Sac- 



ramento, but on the coutrary a number of very warm 
contests, with split heats enough to warm the hearts of 
the old race goers and make the betting fraternity 
wager their money in bigger stacks than they have 
been in the habit of placing on harness results for 
several years. There is not one of the thousand dollar 
purses which closed last week, in which any person 
who is posted can confidently pick out a horse and say 
that he outclasses his field. There are several that 
havo worked very fast miles, but in every race where 
such a one is namod, there are two or three others that 
have shown enough .speed to warrant their owners in 
the belief that they have a good chance to win if they 
are right when they start. I havo seen quite a number 
of tho fast green ones taking their work this year and 
I never saw a better mannered lot than these trotters 
and pacers have so far proven themselves. It is true 
that not many really fast miles have been driven 
and this is a good sign tor fast heats when the money 
is up and the bell rings. The majority of trainers 
who are getting ready for the California circuit this 
year have adopted the plan of making haste slowly, 
and when they have been shown one or two fast miles, 
havo concluded that condition is the thing to add to it, 
instead of trying to pile up more speed. I confidently 
look forward to a season of racing here in which the 
greatest speed will be shown by tho majority at tho 
end of the season instead of during the first week or 
so, as has often been the case, and I know there are 
fewer bad logs than over among the horses in training. 
Our trainers are men of pretty good average intelli. 
gence and are keeping up with tho procession as well 
as tho trainers in any part of the country. It is the 
hardest thing in the world for many people to recog- 
nize the abilities of those with whom they come in 
daily contact, as distance not only lends enchantment 
but glamour to the view. We hear of trainers who 
pilot horses to victory over on tho Eastern tracks and 
imagine that they must be far in advance of our local 
horsemen in ability, but while there are some "bad 
ones" in this as in every other country, the California 
trainers will compare very favorably|with those of any 
State in the Union, and if one will but look over tho 
books he will find that they have tho records to 
prove it. 

The telegraph announces that a new trotting asso- 
ciation is in course of organization over east, Cleveland 
being the centre of tho movement which it is said will 
extend far enough to take in all the big tracks on tho 
Grand Circuit. The eastern papers that have reached 
me up to this time are all agreed that the cause of the 
organization is tho attitude of the National Trotting 
Association toward the amateurs, this organization 
having decided that a horse winning a cup race cannot 
escape the record therein made. Some of tho leading 
spirits in the amateur clubs have concluded that they 
will not have their horses punished when they are rac- 
ing for fun, and the result is the Continental Trotting 
Association, unless tho organization "dies a bornin" as 
somo havo predicted it will. I wonder if it ever oc- 
curred to these amateur gentlemen that for years and 
years all kinds of sports have been troubled with 
the very difficult question of determining the proper 
place to draw the line between professionals and ama- 
teurs and that the main cause of tho trouble is the de- 
sire to enter in professional events without losing 
amateur standing. Now it seems to me that any per- 
son who drives a horse in a race where anything is at 
stake should be willing to have his horse thereafter 
confined to the class which his record made in the race 
places him. In other words, a gentleman who drives 
his horse in 2:20 in a race for a valuable trophy should 
disdain to enter him tho next week in the 2:30 class. 
If, as is the case at the Cleveland and Los Angeles 
matinees, the races are for absolutely nothing, the 
case is different, but when anything of value is com- 
peted for, the horse is as much entitled to a record 
as though he were the winner of the M. and M. 
I would not "penalize' - tho driver in one of these cup 
races by making him a professional, but I believe the 
horse should have the record he earns. Where tho 
punishment comes in I cannot for the life of me under- 
stand. Perhaps my perceptive faculties are very poor, 
but it seems to me a very absurd proposition that a 
person should ask tho privilege of racing his horse to 
a fast record in a cup race and then turn him over to 
a professional driver to race in the green class. If this 
action has any of the elements of true amateur sport 
in it then amateur sport is not what I havo always 
understood it to be. A true sportsman values a cup 
or a trophy much higher shan he does a purse or stake 
of coin. Why then should he not be willing (if after 
winning a cup he should desire to race for money) to 
race in his proper class? H. 

W. F. Steele last week offered (ieorge Leavitt $10,- 
000 for the two year old colt Todd by Bingen out of a 
mare by Arion, and the offer was promptly refused. 
When Steele asked Leavitt why he thought the colt 
was worth more than he offered, the latter answered: 
"Because he is royally bred, is a stallion, the most 
promising colt in America, and is entered in $40,000 
worth of stakes." 



Racing at Yreka. 

A very successful race meeting was held at Yreka 
last week, four days' racing being given. The meeting 
was given by the Yreka Jockey Club, of which J. M. 
Walbridge is president, R. S. Taylor secretary, and 
Messrs. G. H. Peters, F. A. Autenreith, W. L. Hobbs 
and J. E. Harmon are directors. Great credit is due 
these gentlemen for tho excellent manner in which the 
races were managed and those who attended speak 
very highly of the good racing that was given. The 
results were as follows: 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 8. 
Trotting, 3:00 class. Purse $150. 

Dearon.bg (E.B.Smith) 1 1 

Midget, l> f (W. Hogobootn) 2 2 

Laurel Dell, b m (C. Wheeler) 3 3 

Time— 2:3714, 2:29*. 
Trotting, match race. Purse $25(1. 

Tintourette (Pendleton) 1 I 

Old Folks (Elwood) 2 2 

Time— 2:3214, 2:38«. 
Running, throe furlongs. Purse $100— The Wooer 
won, Montague Maid second, Morcutio last. Time 
0:301. 

Running, six furlongs. Purse $50— Skirmish won, 
Mike Rice second. Red Steel third, Pilot. Time 1:15$. 

Running, half mile. Purse $100— Limber Jim won, 
Swiftwator second, Little Jim third, Harry Gwin. 
Time, 0:48}. 

THURSDAY, JULY 4. 
Trotting and pacing, 2::*) class. Purse $251). 

Banker's Daughter, b m (Ruuyon) 2 2 111 

Convict (Leach) 3 12 2 2 

Tintourette (Hunyon) 1 3 3 3 3 

Time— 2:25';, 2:27, 2:26'4. 2:33'.. 2:34. 
One-half mile dash — Maggie, Wild wood, Wilbur 
Smith and Montasruo Maid started. Montague Maid 
won easily in 1:52, Wildwood second and Wilbur Smith 
third. 

One-half mile dash — Seven starters — W. H. Henry's 
Harry Gwin .(. Whalen's Swiftwator, O. A Martin's 
Red Steel, S. Olsen's Durango, R. M. McDonald's Blue 
Bell, C. Cusick's The Wooer and H. H. Mitchell's 
Carrie Nation. Blue Bell won in 1:48}, The Wooer 
second and Harry Gwin third. 

Seven-eighths mile dash — William McName's Sug- 
den, T. L. McLaughlin's Mike Rice, I. J. Ellis' Sea 
Spray and B. F. Holntrt's Limber Jim started. After 
an exciting finish Mike Rice won by a nose in 1:29, 
Sugden second, Limber Jim third. 

FRIDAY, JULY 5. 

First race, 2:20 class — Prince L. won in three straight 
heats, Laura Dell second and Freda S. last. Best 
time, 2:29. 

Second race, five-eighths dash — Durango won, Harry 
Gwin second and Swiftwater third. Time, 1:02} 

Third race, five eighths dash — Pilot won, Rod Steel 
second and The Wooer, the favorite, third. Time, 
1:021. 

Fourth race, mile dash — Sugden won, Sea Spray 
second and Montana Chieftain third. Time, 1:44, the 
fastest mile ever run on Yreka track. 

SATURDAY, JULY ti. 

First race, trotting and pacing, best three in five — 
Lynall, Ruby J. and Deacon started. Lynall took the 
first heat, in 2:25, Deacon took the second in 2:241. On 
starting for the third heat Ruby S.'s driver broke his 
harness and the judges gavo him five minutes to fix it. 
Not returning in time the other two started. Lynall 
nook third heat in 2:25 and fourth in 2:2(i. All bets 
were declared off on this race. 

Second race, running, quarter mile dash — Blue Bell 
won, Little Jim second, Durango third. Time 0:23', . 

Third race, match race, half mile, between Coyle 
and Sunlight — Coyle won in 0:491. 

Fourth race, seven eighths of a mile dash — In this 
race the rider of Miko Rice, Stump Golden, fell twice 
before the horses started, and after they got off he fell 
again and was run over and badly bruised, but not 
seriously hurt. Skirmish won, Pilot second, The 
Wooer third and Mike Rice last. Time 1:291. 

Fifth race, three-quarters of a mile dash — Harry 
Gwynn won, Sea Spray (the favorite) a close second, 
Red Steel third and Montana Chieftain last. Time 
1:161. 

Sixth r ce, match race between Montague Maid and 
Fille d'Or — Montague Maid won in 51 seconds. 

Detroit Program. 

FIRST DAY, JULY 15. 

2:H Trot, Hotel Cadillac 3 in 5, $2,500 

2:24 Pace, Chamber of Commerce 3 in 5, 5,000 

2:20 Trot 2 in 3, 1,500 

2:0BPace 2 in 3, 1,5ft) 

SECOND DAY, JULY 16. 

2:20 Pace 3 in 5, $1,500 

2:24 Trot, Merchants' and Manufacturers' 3 in 5, 10,000 

2- lti Pace 2 in 3, 1,500 

2:08 Trot 2 in 3, 1,500 

THIRD DAY, JULY 17. 

2:17 Trot. Russell House 3 in 5, $2,500 

2:14 Pace, Wayne Hotel 3 In 5, 2,500 

Free-for-all Pace 2 In 3, £800 

2:10 Trot I in 3, 1000 

FOURTH DAY, JULY IK. 

2:27 Trot 3 in 5, $1,500 

2:09 Pace, Hotel Normandie 3 in 5, 2,500 

B'ree-for-all Trot 2 in 3, 2,500 

2:24 Pace, Chamber of Commerce Consolation 2 in 3, 1,000 

FIFTH DAY, JULY 19. 

2:27 Pace 3 in 5, $1,500 

2:11 Pace 3 in 5, 1,500 

2:12 Trot 2 in 3, 1,500 

2:24 Trot, Merchants' and Manufacturers' Consolation 

Stake 2 in 3. 2,000 

Lu the Hotel Cadillac, Dr. Book, Janice and Bob In- 
gersoll are entered. In the Chamber of Commerce, 
Rajah, Harry Logan and Stanton Wilkes. In the 
Merchants and Manufacturers, Algonetta, Harry Mad- 
ison and Eleata. In the Russell House and Wayne 
Hotel, no California owned horses are named. In tho 
Hotel Normandie, Goshen Jim and Rey Direct are 
entered. Tho Chamber of Commerce Consolation and 
the Merchants & Manufacturers' Consolation are for 
horses that win no money in those stakes. 



July 13, 1901] 



Holiday Matinee at Rocklin. 

The best day's racing ever held at Rocklin was at- 
tended by nearly three thousand people on the Fourth 
of July this year, three harness races and two running- 
events furnishing the sport. 

The races were under the auspices of the Rocklin 
Driving Clu"">, which generally celebrates the national 
holiday with an afternoon of matinee racing. The 
judges were the well known reinsmon Ed Lafferty and 
Al McDonald assisted by Mr Schlutius of Sacramento. 

The first race was the free for all pace, half mile 
heats, best three in five, for a purse of $150. There 
were but two starters, the Rocklin pride and up to this 
time unbeaten horse Munyon, beirg the favorite over 
Mr. Callendine's Abdino from Sacramento. Abdine 
won after a hard fought race of four heats. In each 
heat the horses were neck and neck nearly the whole 
distance and the heats were the fastest ever seen in 
Rocklin. Abdine is a greatly improved horse and 
should reduce his record of 2:17J this year. 

In the 2:40 class for both trotters and pacers, the 
first of the get of Stam B. 2:11} to start in a race, the 
very handsome four year old filly Rosalind, owned and 
driven by M. H. Tuttle, owner of her sire, won with 
ease and paced the last heat in 1:11}, a gait which she 
^an certainly keep for a mile, and take a record under 
2:20 before the season is over. 

There were four heats in the three minute class race 
which was for trotters and pacers, Hi Hogoboom win- 
ning with the gelding Duke of Waldstein by Waldstein 
2:22' . 

The summaries of the days events are as follows: 

Free for all pace. Purse $150 

Abdine b g bv Wilkesdale (Holmes) 1 1 2 1 

Munyon. b g by Wilkesdale (Ivey) 2 2 1 2 

Time-1:07, 1:1)8, 1:08, 1:0754- 

Trot or pace, 2:40 class. Purse $50. 

Rosalind, b f by Stam B (Tuttle) 1 1 1 

Old Tom, untraced (Williams) 3 2 2 

Lambert (Hogoboom) 2 3 3 

Time— 1:15, 1:15*4, 1:11X- 

Trot or pace. 3:00 class. Purse $50. 

Duke of Waldstein by Waldstein (Hogoboom) 12 11 

Flossie (Williams) 2 13 2 

John L (Mitchell) 5 3 2 3 

Polka Dot bv Mendocino (Tryon) 4 4 4 4 

Ellen B. by Duke Cameo (Hendrickson) 3 5 5 d 

Time-l:19, 1:17, 1:16ft 1:14. 

Running, half mile dash, purse $30— Quoins first, Prince M. 
second. Time 0:523>£. 

Running, five furlongs, purse $30— Quoins first., Prince M. second. 
Time 1:07 ft 



Shipping Horses at New Orleans. 

New Orleans, July 3. — The South Africa horse 
and mule trade has shown a great revival in the last 
few days. Four British transports have reached here 
this week to load with animals for Cape Town, and 
four more are dated to arrive during the week. One 
thousand mules left on the Jamaican to-day, 500 mules 
and horses to go to-morrow, 1500 mules and 1000 
horses the next day. British officers think the pres- 
ent activity will continue until Christmas. The British 
Government has 8000 head of mules and 7000 horses at 
Kansas City, which will be shipped to New Orleans as 
fast as vessels here can load them. 

Dr. E. B. Richardson, who has just returned from 
South Africa, where he has been in charge of ship- 
ments of mules and horses, says the moro experience 
British officers have with American animals the better 
pleased they are. Richardson thinks the British are 
very hard on horses, and the heavy loss of animals is 
due to this strain. The horses are allowed only one 
day's rest after a sea voyage of a month, and are then 
hurried forward to the seat of war. They are put 
into actual service at once and get no rest from that 
time forward until they are worn out. 

News from the North. 



[Rural Spirit, July 5.] 

Dr. E. H. Parker has bought the pacing mare Bonnie 
Belle 2:244 and will drive her on the road. 

Jim Misner has gone to Montana with Little Maid 
2:18 and her Altamont four year old, Printer's Ink. 

Kittitas Ranger won the r ree for all pace at Van- 
couver, B. C, beating Pathmark and Alta Norte, best 
time 2:221 

Pathmark won the free for all pace at Kvorett yes- 
terday, Starkey second, Kittitas Ranger third; time 
2:18. Hattie Holly won the two year old trot in 3:04. 

Frank Frazier of Pendleton won tho opening event 
at Butte last Saturday with Mt.iHood in 2:24i, giving 
his stallion Westfiold his first 2:30 performer. 

Arketa won the free for all trot at Vancouver, B. C, 
best time 2:24}. Aborigine won the Vancouver Derby, 
one and one-half miles, in 2:27; Favorsham was second. 

John Pender has returned to Oregon from Sacramento 
witb his stallion Capt. Jones by McKinnoy 2:11], out of 
Midday Belle by Gossiper 2:14',. Capt. Jones is bred 
like Zolock 2:102 an( l Zephyr, the three year old filly 
that recently sold for $9000 in the East. He will be 
allowed to serve a few mares at Irvington track, and 
then put in active training for tho fall races. He is 
entered in the $1000 stake at North Yakima, and will 
likely start in one or two events before going there. 
Mr. Pender brought along a two year old filly by Capt. 
Jones that is entered in the $1000 stake at Salem for 
two year olds. She is said to be very promising. 



Death ot Columbine. 

The great broodmare Columbine passed away at the 
Vina Ranch, a branch of Palo Alto on July 3, 1901. 

Columbine was a bay mare 15.3 hands, small star, 
little white on near hind heel and coronet, foaled 1873. 
Bred by Joseph Cairn Simpson, Oakland, Cal. She 
was a remarkable brood mare having produced twelve 
foals, among the number several fast performers and 
producers. Her blood lines wore rich in the thorough- 
bred, her dam being Columbia, a daughter of imp- 
Bonnie Scotland, her grandam Young Fashion by imp. 
Monarch, the next the great racing mare Fashion, by 
imp. Trustee. The sire of Columbine was A. W. 
Richmond 1687, son of Blackbird 401, dam a daughter 
of Rattler. 

In 1878 Columbine was owned by Joseph Cairn Simp- 
son and he bred her to Electioneer, she producing in 
1879 the stallion Anteeo 2:16£, a colt trotter and great 
sire, having produced Anglina 2:11;, Eolino 2:14',, 
Faris 2:12', and 40 others in the 2:30 list. 1 lis daughter 
produced Directum Kelly 2:08}; his son produced- 
Charlie Herr 2:07. Anteeo was sol.l for $30,000. 

In 1880, still the property of Joseph Cairn Simpson, 
she was again bred to Electioneer and produced in 
1881 the colt Antevolo 2:19.1, a colt trotter and sire of 
14 in tho 2:30 list. Antevolo was sold for $35,000. 

In 1881 Columbine was sold by Joseph Cairn Simp- 
son to Governor Stanford and in 1882 foaled the br c 
Anteros by Electioneer. Anteros is the sire of Antidote 
(p) 2:10} and 28 others in the 2:30 list. Barren in 1883, 
Columbine foaled in 1884 by Electioneer the b f Antonia, 
sold from Palo Alto as a broodmare. Barren in L885, 
she produced in 1886 the b c Conrad by Electioneer. 
Conrad was sold from Palo Alto, is the sire of Alice 
Main 2:18 2 l and Zelnut 2:24}. 

In 1887 Columbine foaled by Electioneer the bay filly 
Coral 2:18.5, a stake winner, the dam of Norcal 2:29} 
and Colonel Edwards. When Coral trotted in 2:18J, it 
gave Columbine three in the 2:20 list, a remarkable 
showing in 1892 for a broodmare. 

Barren in 1888, she produced in 1889 the bay filly 
Columbia, this foal died young. Barren in 1890. She 
produced in 1891 the b c Joseph Cairn Simpson 2:18$ 
by Electioneer. He is the sire of Sally Simpson 2:21 J . 

This gave the grand old broodmare four in the 2:20 
list. Coral is a broodmare at Palo Alto and has been 
bred to McKinney 2:11] in 1901. 

Barren in 1892, she produced in 1893 the br c Elbine> 
by Electricity 1:16$. This colt was taken sick enroute 
to a sale in the East, and sold at San Antonio, Texas. 

In 1893 Columbine produced the beautiful colt 
Adbine, by Advertiser 2:15}. Adbiue was sold at a 
New York sale, subsequently purchased by Mr. J. B. 
Haggin and placed in the stud at his Kentucky farm. 

In 1895 she produced the b c Columnario, by Adver- 
tiser 2:15}, sold in Now York. In 1896 barren and in 
1897 at the age of 24 she produced the ch f Antevo, by 
Dexter Prince, a filly that is reserved at Palo Alto as a 
broodmare. 

Take her all in all Columbine was a great broodmare 
having four in the 2:20 list, five producing sons and a 
producing daughter, a great showing for the half 
thoroughbred daughter of imp. Bonnie Scotland, that 
carried the blood of Fashion. Rio Alto. 

Turf Scandal at Honolulu. 

According to a report from Honolulu sent by tho last 
steamer, Prince David has sworn to warrants for the 
arrest of W. H. Cunningham and J. Morgan, two well 
known local turf men, on a charge of conspiracy, 
alleging that they attempted to hire his jockey to drug 
the horse Weller in the race of June 14th. Weller is 
one of the prince's horses and was a strong favorito in 
the betting until the ovoning before the race, when his 
price fell under heavy betting against him. 

The jockey informed tho prince that tho defendants 
had offered him a large bribe to dopo tho horse before 
the race. The jockey declares that ho took a pill 
given him for the purpose, but did not administer it, 
turning it over to tho princo. 

Weller was an easy winnor in the race. The scandal 
has created quite a sensation thoro, being tho first of 
tho kind in a long series of Kamehamoha day races. 

Proposed New Organization. 

Cleveland, Ohio, July 2. — Subscription books 
were opened here to-day looking to tho formation of a 
new trotting association, which will be a rival of the 
National Trotting Association. It will be known as 
the Continental Trotting Association. Subscriptions 
to the $10,000 capital stock came in rapidly, ft is said 
that W. B. Fasig probably will be elected president 
and Frank L. Chamberlain of this city secretary. 
The headquarters will be in Cleveland. It is under- 
stood that the now association will embrace practically 
all tho cities now included in tho grand circuit. 

The two year old sister to Idolita 2:12 trotted a 
quarter at Roadville, Mass., recently in 33 J seconds. 



Horse Gossip From Salem, Or. 

Fair Grounds, July 8, 1901. 
The track here is becoming quite lively as there are 
more trainers coming in with good horses and they 
are all commencing to step along a littlo faster as the 
rainy season is over now. 

The carpenters are vory busy making improvements. 
Thoro are at present seven car loads of lumber here at 
the grounds, and it will all b9 used in fixing up tho 
building and grounds. 

Mr. Rutherford has arrived hero from Walla Walla 
with four head of very promising colts and Mr. J. B. 
Stetson came in to-day from Boise, Idaho, with fivo 
head, three of which are mares that will bo bred to 
Zombro, including Alta Tiel and Lyla 2:27 (both full 
sisters to Chahalis 2:04}) and Lady Alfred 2:20. The 
last named mare will be entored in the 2:15 and free 
for all trots here this year. She is ono of th6 grandest 
looking mares I ever saw and should raise a groat colt 
from Zombro. 

Sam Casto has six head at work here, among them 
a very hot one. Her name is Alta Norte. She is a 
full sister to Chehalis and gaited just liko him. Sam 
gave her a pretty stiff work out Saturday and she 
felt so good on Sunday that she could hardly be led 
by tho halter. Mr. Casto, who was raised in the South 
and uses many coon phrases says she is his "honey." 
"sure flour in tho bar'l," and "sure black, but her 
ha'r aint kinky." 

Mr. Hiller has the largest stable of len ses up here. 
He has twelve head and some very good ones among 
them. A two year old pacing stud colt by Del Norte 
2:08, dam by Wilkie a son of Guy Wilkes, is about the 
fastest thing of his age in tho northern country. I 
don't see how they will ever beat him as it is no 
trouble now for him to pace a quarter in 35 seconds. 

John Kirkland from Independence has five in his 
string, all going nice and smooth. Once in a while he 
lets them step for a short distance and how they do go! 
Johnnie don't say much but keeps "sawing wood." 
He is the Geers of Oregon 

Mr. Connors of the Williamette Hotel has Stamboul 
Bell 2:21, and the easy way she has of stepping the home 
stretch in 35 seconds looks to me as if she has the 2:20 
trot at her mercy. 

Mr. I. C. Mosier is the hardest worker and the 
busiest man on the grounds. Besides looking after 
the track and keeping it in good shape for the boys to 
work on, he has six head in training. Among them is 
a black two year old by his stallion Coeur d'Alene 2:19, 
which I think is a crackerjack if there ever was one- 
From what I have seen of her I think Mr. Wisdom 
might as well pay the first money in the Oregon two 
year old stake over to Mr. Mosier. 

We had a very nice quiet sociable here on the 
Fourth. The boys all gathered in front of Zombro's 
stall and tapped a ten gallon keg of Salem beer at 
Zombro's expense. The boys all drank his health and 
toasted him as the Geo. Wilkes of tho Pacific. Zombro 
has been here just 34 days and has been bred to 47 
mares. Every day will be Sunday with him by and by. 

Mr. Shannon has three horses in training which ho 
intends to start this year, but is not talking for publi- 
cation just now. 

There is no one at the Salem track, barring the 
writer, that can talk the clock down, but we have the 
hottest coon in America here. He is from the far east. 
James Edwards is his name and he keeps everybody in 
good humor with his droll remarks. He says he only- 
wants to live long enough to get a red vest with white 
polka dots on it, and there won't be any coon with a 
lady but him, whenever he casts his "goo goo eyes" 
on them. 

Send us up a carload of swipes, as wo are short of 
somo good ones. Tho wages are $20 to $25 and found. 

Yours, Geo. T. Brokers. 

The Prehistoric Horse. 

Aided by a special fund presented by a friend of the 
American Museum of Natural History, Professor 
Osborn sent out two expeditions, especially in search 
of fossil horses, one to Texas and one to Kastorn 
Colorado. Word has just been received at tho museum 
that tho vory first discovery made by tho Texas party 
included three skulls of tho throe-toed horse, proto- 
hippus, associated with parts of the legs, feot and 
baok-bono. This is ono of tho stages especially desirod 
in a long series leading up to tho modern horso. 

The skulls are roported to bo tho best that have thus 
far been found, and this discovery is an auspicious 
opening to this special series of explorations. The 
protohippus belongs to tho plioceno and is believed to 
bo tho immediato ancestor of the true horso. Whereas, 
the hipparion. the plioceno horse of Europe, is now 
found to be not the ancestral horse, but a representa- 
tive of a side line. All recent researches go to prove 
that the phylum of the true horse belongs to North 
America. 



(The $veebev mtt* &p&vt&man 



[July 13, 1901 



THE WEEKLY 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

— OFFICE — 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



P. O. BOX 2300. 



Terms— One Year S3, Six Mouths SI. 75, Three Mouths SI 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley, 36 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must bo accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 

G. G. TIIKKI & CO., Agents. Subscription and advertising. 

Salisbury Building, Melbourne, Australia 



San Francisco, Saturday, July 13, 1001. 



Dates Claimed. 



VANCOUVER, B. C July 1-2 

" ■■ ' Aug. 31 to Sept. 1 

DENVER, Col June 15-29 

BUTTE and ANACONDA June 29-60 days 

EVERETT, Wash Sept. 9-15 

BOISE. Idaho (State Fair) — , Sept. 16-21 

CARSON CITY, Nev Sept. 22-38 

SALEM, Oregon (State Fair) Sept. 23-28 

NEW WESTMINSTER (1'rovincial Fair) Oct. 1-5 

LA GRANDE, Oregon Oct. 1-5 

THE DALLES, Oregon (District Fair) Oct. 1-5 

LEWISTON. Idaho (Inter-State Fair) Oct. 7-12 

VICTORIA, B. C Oct. 7-13 

BAKER CITY, Oregon October 6-13 

SPOKANE, Wash Sept. 10-21 

THE GRAND CIRCUIT. 

DETROIT July 15-20 

CLEVELAND Julv 22-27 

COLUMBUS July 29 to Aug. 3 

BUFFALO Aug. 5-10 

GLENS FALLS Aug. 12-17 

READVILLE Aug. 19-34 

HARTFORD Sept. 3-6 

SYRACUSE Sept. 9-13 

PROVIDENCE Sept. 26-30 

TERRE HAUTE Sept. 30 to Oct. 5 

CALIFORNIA. 

P. C. T H. B. A., SACRAMENTO July 39 to Aug. 3 

WOODLAND, District No. 40 August 26-31 

CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR, Sacramento Sept. 3-14 

FERNDALE, Humboldt Sept. 10-14 

STOCKTON Sept. 16 to 31 

CONCORD. (District No. 33) Sept. 23 to 28 

LOS ANGELES Sept. 28 to Oct. 12 incl 

WILL HOLD MEETINGS. 

WILLOWS, Glenn Co July or August 

SANTA ANA, Cal October 

SALINAS September 

BTSHOP, Cal September or October 

SANTA ROSA, Cal August or September 



Stallions Advertised. 



TPHE BIG LIST OF ENTRIES received by the Los 
* Angeles association for its trotting and pacing: 
purses, which closed July 1st, has so pleased the Hoard 
of Directors that thoy have opened six additional 
trotting- purses at $700 each, five additional purses for 
pacers at $700 each, besides offering a purse of $800 for 
the 2:11 class pacers. This is indeed a grand lot of 
purses, especially when the fact is taken into consid- 
eration that no less than 12 purses aggregating $10,000 
have already been declared tilled. The entries to 
these additional purses will close on Saturday, August 
3d, and we feel sure that the owners and trainers of 
eligible horses will be as generous with their entries as 
the Los Angeles association is with its purses. All the 
horsemen who visited the southern metropolis last 
year during the very successful fair and race meeting 
held there in October speak in the very highest terms 
of the treatment received at the hands of President 
Wright, Secretary Teed and the other officials of 
the association, and all aie anxious to go again this 
year. The date of the opening has beon advanced this 
year to September 28th, which is a much more con- 
venient date for the California horsemen, who have, 
in the entry list just closed, shown their appreciation 
of the efforts of District No. 6, and will make a still 
further approval of the same bv a generous entry in 
the purses that close August 3d, which will be found 
advertised in our columns to-day. 



THE FIRST INSTALLMENT of purses for trotters 
and pacers is announced by the State Agricultural 
Society in our advertising colums to-day. Eight very 
liberal purses are offered to close Saturday, July 27th, 
and Hi more will be announced August 10th. Those to 
close July 27th are the 2:14 trot $1000, the 2:20 trot 
$800, the 2:40 trot $800, the 2:13 pace $1000, the 2:17 
pace $800 and tho 2:2f> pace $800. In addition there 
are two races for colts. The three year old pacers are 
provided for in a stake in which the entrance is $10, 
with $20 additional from starters. The Society will 
add $250 to tho stake and if there is a liberal entry list 
and fair field of starters the stake will bo a valuable 
one. A race for four year old trotters of tho green 
class is provided with the same conditions. It will bo 
readily seen that the* State Fair Directors are treating 
the harness horse owners most liberally this year and 
there is every reason to believe that these owners will 
be reciprocal and send in to Secretary Geo. W. Jack- 
son a record-breaking list of entries. Entries will 
closo to this first installment of purses on Saturday, 
July 27th. 



TROTTING BBSS. 

McKINNEY 2:11* C. A. Durfee, San Jose 

NUTWOOD WILKES 2:16^4 Martin Carter, Irvington 

HACKNEYS. 

GREEN'S RUFUS The Baywood Stud. San Mateo 



ENTRIES CLOSE MONDAY NEXT for fourteen 
additional stakes to be trotted and paced at the 
Breeders meeting, which opens at Sacramento July 
30th. The six one thousand dollar stakes filled well, 
and while those to close Monday are for lesser amounts, 
the stakes offered are a< liberal as the California horses 
which went East have been trotting for up to this time- 
There is no longer any doubt but the approaching 
season of harness racing on this coast will be a most 
successful one. There has not been such largo entry 
lists for years as those already received by the Breeders 
andjjhe Los Angeles associations for their stakes which 
closed July 1st. The latter association has as many as 
thirty entries in one race, a number which has not 
been received by any Pacific Coast association for 
years. The harness horse industry is no longer in the 
dumps. The prices at which good trotting bred horses 
are held, and which are paid for ordinary ones at 
auction are eVidonce of the good condition of tho 
breeding business, and the big lists of entries being 
received from Maine to California prove that harness 
racing is still one of our most popular sports. By 
reference to the advertisement in the Brekder and 
SPORTSMAN this week it will be found thai a stake (one 
for the 2:23 class trotters) has been provided in addi- 
tion to those advertised last week. Up to dato there 
are four high class meetings in sight, the Breeders, 
Santa Rosa, the State Fair and the Los Angeles. 
Woodland will take a week preceding the State Fair, 
but as yet has not announced its purses. The first to 
close and the first to race is the P. C.T. H. B. A. Give 
it the best lot of entries you can possibly afford for 
these additional stakes and there need be no fear of 
the result. The best meeting given by this association 
in years is certain. 



SPOKANE'S BIG MEETING will open September 
10th. Entries to the harness events will close 
Thursday, July 25th. Horsemen who will race in the 
north this year should not let this date go by without 
naming their horses in tho classes at this meeting to 
which they are eligible. Ten thousand dollars is 
offered in purses. Address H. Bolster, Secretary, 
Spokane, Wash. 



Oakwood Park Farm Sale. 



Santa Rosa meeting opens August 12th: entries close 
August 3d. See program on next page. 



At the Occidental Horse Exchange on Thursday of 
this week auctioneer William G. Layng conducted a 
very successful sale of fifty head of horses from the well 
known Oakwood Park Stock Farm, Danville. Contra 
Costa county, the property of Mr. John F. Boyd. 
While all the horses offered were broken to harness 
and were well bred, they were not offered as a picked 
lot of high class horses from this celebrated farm, and 
therefore the prices obtained must be considered 
very good, as the fifty head sold brought a total 
of $8175, an average of $163.50 per head. We 
do not believe these horses would have averaged 
a cent over $200 in Chicago or New York, and 
the prices obtained show that San Francisco is a 
very good market at present for this class of horses. 
The highest prices of the sale wore paid for two mares 
by Chas Derby, one a three year old for which Captain 
Matteson paid $325, the other a five year old which 
brought $320. The prices obtained were as follows: 

Ch g, 1897, by El Benton-by Steinway, $100; b g, 
1898, by El Benton-by Wood nut $105; b m, 1898. by El 
Benton-by Woodnut, $90; br g, 1898, by El Benton-by 
Prince Red, $125; bg, 1897, by Chas. Dorby-by Copper- 
head, $160; ch g, 1898, by Major Ban, $80; Heather 
Brae, b f, 1898, by El Benton-by Chas. Derby, $110; b 
g, 1898, by Steinway-by Irvington, $100; b g, 1898, by 
Chas. Derby-by Guy Wilkes, $85; b g, 1898, by 
Kawookum-by Prince Red, $120; b g, 1898, by Chas. 
Derby-Flash, $175; Loquat, b m, 1897, by Steinway- 
Lucy E., $140; ch g, 1897, by Chas. Derby, $135; b g, 

1897, by Major Ban, $225; b g, 1897, by Major Ban, 
$115; Stelmo, blk m, 1896, by Steinway-by Elmo, $200: 
b g, 1897, by El Benton-by Prince Red, $155; br g, 

1898. by Chas. Derby-by Black Walnut, $95; b m, 1897, 
by Major Ban, $180; b m, 1897, by Major Ban, $155; br 
s, 1898, by El Benton-by Steinway, $185; b s, 1898, 
by Don L.-by Echo, $265: b m, 1896, by Prince Hilton, 



$120; Clairet, b m, 1897, by Chas Derby-by Richards' 
Elector, $225; b m, 1896, by Prince Red-by Marshal 
Ney, $150; b g, 1896, by Prince Red-by Baron Hilton, 
$200; Nannerl, b m, 1897, by El Benton-by Red Wilkes, 
$130; b g, 1897, by El Benton-by Steinway, $185; ch g, 

1896. by Major Ban, $100; Raraona's Last, br m, 1895! 
by Steinway-Ramona, $125; b m, 1896, by Prince Red, 
$185; b g, 1896, by Prince Red, $155; Red Bird, b glby 
Prince Red-Alma, $210; Prince Tom, b g, 1897, by El 
Benton, $230; b m, 1896, by El Benton, $145; b g, 1897, 
by El Benton, $105; Babe Benton, b m, 1897, by El 
Benton-Babe Marion, $195; Wanolasset, b m, 1897, by 
El Benton-by Steinway, $220; Belle Heather, ch m, 

1897, by Steinway-Idol Belle, $160; Papinta, blk m, 
1897, by Chas. Derby-Directess, $205; Deroline, b m, 
1897, by Chas. Derby-Caroline, $280; g m, 1897, by 
Chas. Derby-Clementine, $130; b g, 1898, by Chas. 
Derby-Flora, $325; Killicrankie, b m, 1898, by Chas. 
Derbv-Annie Laurie, $200; b g, 1898, by Chas. Derby- 
Cotv, $150: br g, 1S9S, bv Chas. Derby-Clara, $180; * b 
g, 1808. In i 'has. Derbv Kthel, $100; b is. 1897, bv ('has. 
Derby-Black Belle, $140; b g, 1897, by Steinway- 
Lunado, $215; Novsky, b m, 1896, by Chas. Derby-by 
Balkan, $320. _____ 

Los Angeles Closes 12 Stakes. 

The Los Angeles Association, District No. 6, has 
closed an oven dozen of its heretofore advertised 
stakes with the following splendid list of entries. 
Twelve additional stakes are announced in our adver- 
tising columns this week: 

Trotting— 2:12 Class. 
Geo. E. Anderson, Claudius; T. C. Cabncy, Jack W.;T. J. Crowley, 
Boydello; J. W. Donathan, McBriar; George W. Ford, Neernut, 
Vendome Stock Farm, Nora McKiuney, Thomas R.: W. S. Maben's 
Richmond Chief; I. H. Mulholland, Osito; L. Tucker, Santa Anita 
Star. 

Trotting— 2:14 Class. 

T. .1. Crowley, Boydello; I. H. Mulholland, Osito; L. Tucker, 
Santa Anita Star: Geo. A. Kelly, Auzella; Vendome Stock Farm 
Nora Mc-Kinney, Thomas R.: W. S. Maben, Richmond Chief: J. V" 
Donathan, McBriar; C. C. Hickey, Columbia; Geo. E Anderson 
Claudius; Henry Delaney, Geo. W. McKiuney; Walnut Grove Farm 
Lottie: S. H. Hoy, McNally; Geo. P. McNiel, Dan W. 

Trotting— 2:15 Class 

T. .1. Crowley, Boydello; L. Tucker, Santa Anita Star; C. H' 
Austin, Edison; Vendome Stock Farm. Nora McKinney. Thomas R.; 
W. S. Maben, Richmond Chief; Henry Delaney, Geo.:W. McKinney 
Geo. P. McNiel, Dan W; Valencia Stock Farm, Bet Madison; Ho 
Yow, Solo; Walnut Grove Stock Farm, Lottie; H. H. Hellman, 
Ned Thorne; S. H. Hoy, McNally; S. A. Hooper, Alta Vela. 

Trotting -2 : 1» Class. 

C. H. Austin, Edison: D. F Oglesby. Almonada; W. S. Maben, Dr. 
Mac; Vendome Stock Farm, Azalia. Solo: J- H. Kelly, Roxe; Robt. 
Freeman, Prince L ; C. Denison, Little Mac. R R. Brown, Fannie 
Richards; Ho Yow, China Maid; J. G. Culcello, Puerto Rico, James 
Wallace. Midget, A. G. Gurnette, What Is It; J. M. Nelson. Alox 
B., Priucess Artie. 

Trottlng-2:23 Class. 

I. H. Mulholland, Peter Jackson; J. H. Kelly, Roxe; Vendome 
Stock Farm, Azalia, Solo; W. S. Maben, Dr Mac; C. C. Hickey. 
Columbia; A. G. Gurnette, Zombra; James Wallace, Midget; D. F. 
Oglesby, Almonada; F. Keller, Briar K., R. R Brown, Fannie 
Richards; Robert Freeman, Prince L.: Edward Dupuy, Rozell; C. 
Denison; Little Mac; Albert Joseph, Flora Dora; J. M. Nelson' 
Alex B., Princess Artie; J. W. Proctor, Mary P.. Rochab; Ho Yow' 
China Maid. 

Facing— 2 ;09 Class. 

C. Whitehead, Delphi; A. L. Conklin, Edna R.; J. F. Snover, 
Floracita; H. H. Hellman, Myrtha Whips; S. H. Hoy, Kelley 

Briggs. 

Pacing— 2:13 Class. 
C. Whitehead, Delphi; H. H. Dunlap, King Cadenza: J. H. 
Thompson, El Diablo; R. R. Brown, Doc Wilkes; W. Mastin, John 
A.; S. C. Tryon, Margueretta. 

Pacing— 2:15 Class. 

C Whitehead, Toppy; H. H. Dunlap, King Cadenza; J. H. 
Thompson, El Diablo; R. R. Brown, Doc Wilkes: S. K. Trefry, 
Freddie C , Direct C : J. L. Smith, Gaff Topsail; W. S. Maben. 
Electra; S. C. Tryon, Margueretta. 

Paring— 2:17 Class. 

C. Whitehead, Toppy; J. H. Williams, Coeur de Lion; J. H 
Thompsou, El Diablo: H. B. Stevens, Maud Wilkes; E. W. Runyan, 
Banker's Daughter: Vendome Stock Farm, Our Boy's Sister, Santa 
Cruz; W. S. Maben, Red Line, Electra; John Donohoe, Midnight, 
Newport; Ed Graser, Nellie I.: P. W. Reardon, Maud R.: R. R. 
Brown. Miramonte; William G. Layng, Sir Albert S.: W. H Wil- 
liams, Ratatat. Julia Shake: S. K. Trefry, Freddie C; J. M. Nel- 
son, The Queen; J.L.Smith, Garf Topsail; H. H. Hellman, Mo- 
tanic: J. A. Lafferty, Advertisor; Walnut Grove Stock Farm, 
Arthur B.; S. H. Hoy, Reta H. 

Paring— 2 :20 Class. 

C. W. Whitehead, Toppy; O. T. Bush, Bendina; J. H. Williams, 
Coeur de Lion; W. D. Mesarvey, Altawood; Julius B. Loving, 
Charter Oak Wilkes: F. A. Ramsey, Lady Nutford; J. M. Raidy, 
Celmar; H. B. Stevens, Maud Wilkes; E. W. Runyan, Banker's 
Daughter: Vendome Stock Farm, Our Boy's Sister, Santa Cruz; 
W. S Maben. Red Line, Electra; C. C. Hickey, Alfred C; John 
Donohoe. Midnight, Richard B.; Ed Graser, Nellie I. ; George P. 
McNiel. El Rayo: P. W Reardon, Maud R.: R. R. Brown, Mira- 
monte; William G. Layng, Sir Albert S.; C. T. Thayer, Chief; 
Valencia Stock Farm, Direct Heir: W. H. Williams, Ratatat; S. 
K. Trefry. Direct C: J. M. Nelson, The Queen: H. H. Helman, 
Motauic; J. A. Lafferty; Advertisor: Walnut Grove Stock Farm. 
Arthur B : S. H. Hoy, Reta H. 

Nomination Trot— 2:30 Class. 

I. H. Mulholland, F. Keller, Edw. Dupuy, C. H. Austin, Vendome 
Stock Farm, W. S. Maben, C. Denison, Geo. P. McNeil. A. G. 
Gurnett. Albert Joseph, Ho Yow, S. A. Hooper, J.M.Nelson, J. 

M. Proctor. 

Nomination l'aie- 2:25 Class. 

Wm. Baker, O. T. Bush, Julius B. Loving, H. H. Spears (2 
horses), F. A. Ramsey, H. B. Stevens, Vendome Stock Farm. W. S. 
Maben, C. C. Hickey, John Donohue, J. B. Smith. H. G. Butter- 
Held, Geo. P. McNeil, C. T. Thayer, J. W. Johnson, W. H. Williams, 
W. Mastin. 



July 6, 1901] 



5 



Results at Butte. 



July 3. 2:22 pace — Christobel won in two straight 
heats, Lady Ammon second, Oregon Bull third. Best 
time 2:25. 

Five and a half furlongs — Espirando won, Miss 
Rensen second, Aunt Mary third. Time 1:08J. 

Five furlongs — Innocencia won, Yellowstone second, 
Tyranus third. Time 1:02}. 

Seven furlongs — Ada N. won, Quibo second, Guy H. 
third. Time 1:29. 

One mile — Homestake won, (Rainier second, Free 
Pass third. Time 1:44.]. 

Five and a half furlongs — Sea Queen - won, Sweet 
Caporal second, Midsummer third. "Time 1:08}. 

July 4. Six and one half furlongs — William F. won, 
Ting-a-Ling second, Joe K. third. Time 1:22}. 

One mile - Burdock won, The Buffoon second, Harry 
Thatcher third. Time 1:45. 

Seven furlongs — Brown Prince won, Senator Dubois 
second, Bold Fox third. Time 1:29}. 

Four and a half furlongs — Doublet won, Decapo 
second, True Blue third. Time 0:54}. 

Five and a half furlongs — Mocorita won, Amasa 
second, Alary's Garter third. Time 1:08.]. 

One mile — Gauntlet won. Frank Dart'y second, Odd 
Eyes third. Time 1:43}. 

Three furlongs — Honest John won, Don H. second, 
Walkapaugh third. Time 0:35}. 

July 5. Trotting and pacing — Hop Pie won, Club 
Wilkes second. Best time 2:19J. 

Five furlongs — Duckoy won, Don H. second, Sweet 
Voice third. Time 1:01. 

Four and a half furlongs — Dandy won, Huachuca 
second, K. C. Third. Time 0:55. 

Six furlongs — Flamero won, Sweet Caporal second, 
The Butcher third. Time 1 :14J. 

Six furlongs — Miss Remsen won, Mountain Queen 
second, Nobleman third. Time 1:14}. 

One mile and a quarter, five hurdles — Aurifl'era won, 
Rio Chico second, Delgado third. Time 2:21 J. 

July 6 — Pacing — Hassola won in two straight heats. 
Irvin C. and Jim Dixon divided second money. Time, 
2:19J and 2:19. 

Four furlongs — Cayenne Pepper won, Pirate Maid 
second, Prestonian third. Time, 0:49]. 

Six and a half furlongs — George H. Catchum won, 
St. Germain second, Homestake third. Time, 1:22. 

Five furlongs — Valencienne won, Hagerdon second, 
Doublet third. Time, 1:00$. 

Montana Derby, one mile and a quarter — Jim Hale 
won, Keuova second, Ada N. third. Time, 2:10}. 

Four furlongs — Honest John won, Aunt Mary sec- 
ond, Blanche Sheppard third. Time, 0:47]. 



One mile and seventy yards — Spike won, Sylvan 
Lass second, Frank Duffy third. Time, 1:47}. 

July 8 — Threatening weather kept the attendance 
down at the race track to-day and the rain made the 
track heavy. A heavy thunder and lightning storm 
took place just before the races began. Midsummer of 
the Johnson stable was killed instantly by lightning 
while in a stall. A stable boy known as '"Sisquoc" was 
knocked from a stall box, but not seriously injured. 

2:20 pace — Oregon Bull won, Captain P. second, Lady 
Ammer third. Time, 2:26]. 

Four furlongs — Pirate's Maid won, Arline second, 
Peppersauce third. Time, 0:49]. 

One mile — Julietta B. won, Old Fox second, Seasong 
third. Time, 1:45]. 

One mile and a sixteenth— Nobleman won, Rio Chico 
second, Lindenella third. Time, 1:51. 

One mile — Si. Germain won, Mission second, Ida V. 
third. Time, 1:4(5. 

Five furlongs — High Ho won, Montallade second, 
Decapo third. Time 1:03. 

July 9 — First race, trotting — May B. won, Lady J. 
second. Best time, 2:2(5]. 

Second race, three furlongs — Charley Lemar won, 
Don P. second, Jack third. Time, 0:35. 

Third race, live furlongs — Yellowstone won, Inno- 
cencia second, Constable third. Time, 0:55. 

Fourih race, six furlongs — Sisquoc won, Amaza sec- 
ond, Blanche Sheppard third. Time, 1:1(5]. 

Fifth race, four and a half furlongs — Ellis Glenn won, 
Abba L. second, Undergrowth third. Time, 0:55 J. 

Sixth race, one and one-sixteenth miles, hurdles — 
Aurifl'era won, Delgado second, Joe Bell third. Time, 
2:0(5]. 

July 10 — Pacing, 2:18 class — Oregon Bull won, Howell 
second, Royal third. Time, 2:18$, 2:19, 2:20}. 

Five furlongs — Little Henry won, Adnoor second, 
Scotch Belle third. Time, 1:02|. 

Four furlongs — You You won, F. M. Brattain sec- 
ond, Parizade third. Time, 0:48. 

One mile — Spike won, The Butcher second, Gauntlet 
third. Time, 1:43. 

Five and one-half furlongs — Duckoy won, Espirando 
second, Moringa third. Time, 1:09. 

Five furlongs — Montanus won, Jim Brownell second, 
Aunt Mary third. Time, 1:03. 

One mile and seventy yards — Ting-a-ling won, Old 
Fox second, Nonesuch third. Time, 1:48. Senator 
Dubois finished second, but was disqualified for fouling. 

July 11. — Pacing, special — Jim Dixon first, Heppie 
second, Irwin C. third. Time 2:1(5, 2:18]. 

Three furlongs — Walakapugh won, Pay Day second. 
Time 0:35]. Two starters. 

Six furlongs — George H. Ketcham won, William F. 



second, Sisquoc third. Time 1:14}. 

One mile and a sixteenth — Sylvan Lass won, Kenova 
second, Nobleman third. Time 1:49. 

Six furlongs — lulietta B, won, Phil Archibald second 
Immodel third. Time 1:17]. 

Six furlongs — Odd Eyes won, Blanche Sheppard 
second, Harry Thatcher third. Time 1:15]. 

Four and a' half furlongs — Aba D. won, Honest John 
second, Dan II. third. Time 0:55. 



Fourth Payment in Stanford Stake. 

In the Stanford Stake to bo trotted this year at the 
California State Fair, fourth payment has been made 
upon four more entries that were made last year. 
Eleven colts and fillies have been paid on as follows: 

James Coffin's b f Cuba by Oro Wilkes-Mattie Menlo. 

W. Hogoboom's br c Charles H. by Lynmont-El- 
morene. 

Thos. S. Manning's b c Commander Muckle, by Mc- 
Kinney-Cheerful. 

J. Doran's b f Delia McCarty by McKinney-Lady C. 

A. M. McCollum's ch f Jennie H. by Algona-Rosie 
Lee. 

C. A. Owen's ch c Lee Roy by Waldstein-Zadio Mc- 
Gregor. 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm's blk f Almareta by L. W. 
Russell-Flora Allen. 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm's b f Lady Russell by L. W. 
Russell-Pansy. 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm's br c Marengo King by Mc- 
Kinney-Bye Bye. 

G. W. Ford's b f Neernellie by Neernut. 

P. W. Lee's br f Fluey by Or Lee-Fleety. 

Trilby P. 2:13], the Colorado mare that defeated 
Toggles and Stamboutte at Denver, will be retired 
for the summer. She has won five races this year, 
and it is the intention of her owner, J. F. Roberts, to 
give her a well earned vacation through the summer 
months. Three of her five victories have been neck 
and neck affairs with Ima Electrite, and two were at 
Overland Park. Mr. Bernard, who owns Ima Elec- 
trite, says that he is through racing his mare when 
she is not in condition to go. She will be worked all 
summer, but she will not be started again until she is 
in perfect condition. The chances are that when 
Trilby is marched out of the stable in the fall these 
great mares will clash again, as Mr. Bernard is by no 
moans satisfied with the result of yesterday's race. — 
l)i art r Tini/n. 



FIRST ANNUAL MEETING 



OF THE 



Santa Rosa Racing Association 

AT THE SANTA ROSA RACE TRACK 

Six Days, August 12 to 17, 1901, inclusive. 

TROTTING, PACING AND RUNNING. 

Entries to Harness Races to Close SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1901. 



Two or More Running Races Each Day, to Close Over Night. 



GUARANTEED STAKES FOR TROTTERS AND PACERS. 

HORSES TO BE NAMED WITH ENTRY, 



TROTTING. 



2:40 Class Trotting, - - $500 

2:27 Class Trotting\ - - $400 

2:28 Class Trotting, - - $400 

3:18 Class Trotting-, - - $450 

4:14 Class Trotting, $500 



For Conditions gee Kntry Blanks. Address all communications to 

P, H. QUINN, President. 



PACING. 



2:30 Class Pacing, $400 

2:25 Class Pacing, $500 

2:20 Class Pacing, $400 

2:17 Class Pacing $450 

2:12 Class Pacing, $500 



THOS. BONNER, Secretary, Santa Rosa, Cal. 



6 



(The $veebev mtfr gtyox-temcm 



[July 13, 1901 




Detroit meeting opens to-day. 



Los Angeles has a large entry list. 



Entries for Breeders' meeting eloso next Monday. 



The M. & M. will be trotted at Detroit on Tuesday 
next. 



Woodland's program of harness events will soon be 
issued. 



Charles Marvin will start in on the Grand Circuit at 
Cleveland. 



The pacers are going very fast over East. Three 
miles below 2:08 already. 



The city council of Woodland has voted $300 to aid 
the county fair this year. 



The Chamber of Commerce $5000 for 2:24 pacers will 
be paced at Detroit next Monday. 



Toggles was so lame after winning two heats at Den 
ver that ho had to be withdrawn. 



Venus II., Mr. A. B. Spreckels' mare by Cupid, 
worked a half in 1:021 the other day over tho Cleve- 
land track. 

It is expected that President A. B. Spreckels of the 
State Agricultural Society will return from the East 
within a few days. 

Mr. A. W. Bruner drove his pacer, Stanton Wilkes 
by Nutwood Wilkes, a mile in 2:141 at the Cleveland 
track on the 4th of July. 

Chas. Marvin's Chase is considered a good one for 
the M. and M. next Tuesday. Ho recently worked 
him two heats in 2:13i{ and 2:14. 

The Los Angeles association, pleased with its big list 
of entries has advertised an additional list of purses for 
harness horses. See advertisement. 

There are a dozen of tho get of Dictatus 2:17 that 
could enter the list this year if trained. Nearly every 
one of his get shows speed as soon as bridle wise. 

In the free for all trot at the Chicago Driving Club 
matinee, June 29th, the California bred horso Ellert 
2:11 won his race easily. His best time was 2:16. 



Among tho candidates for the M. and M. that have 
given evidence of their ability to at least trot fast miles 
is the bay mare Quoddy Girl by Domineer that is in 
John Kelly's stable. The mare is far above tho ordin- 
ary, and from tho way she works would seem to have 
an excellent chanco in the rich stake at Detroit. 



Ho Yow, the Chinese Consul, has two entries for the 
Breeders meeting— China Maid in the 2:40 class trot 
and Solo 2:23 in the 2:20 trot. Both mares are by 
McKinney. 

H. H. Dunlap took his horse King Cadenza 2:15* to 
Woodland this week where he will be handled by Wm. 
Murray until the opening of the Breeders meeting at 
Sacramento. 



David Cahil had Charley Herr out for a jogging last 
week and after going in an easy way to the three- 
quarter pole he was turned loose for the last quarter, 
which ho trotted nicely in 30} seconds. 

It is said that Dr. David Randell won about $2000 in 
the pools on the race which Moth Miller won at Syra- 
cuse last week, and that he is now willing to arrange a 
match with Prince Alert, or Coney, or both. 

A Hartford correspondent of the Trotter and Pacer, 
after seeing Coney by McKinney work a quarter in 
29} seconds wrote as follows: This pacer is sure to 
take a new record this season, as McDowell has him in 
perfect condition, and he never makes any mistakes, 
when called on he always responds, and seems to have 
speed in reserve always. 

It is announced that all the trotting bred horses in 
tho breeding establishment at Bitter Root Stock Farm 
owned by the late Marcus Daly will be sold at auction 
in New York in November next. The stallions to bo 
sold are Bow Bells, Prodigal, Ponce de Leon and 
Milroi, and the broodmares aro a grand lot of produc- 
ers and mares with fast records. 



Burt H. Whitely, the Indiana horseman, last Satur 
day purchased the fast pacer Edith W., 2:06], paying 
$4500 for her, and already has refused an advance of 
$750 on the price paid him. This mare started in ten 
races last season and secured w inning brackets in all 
but two of them. She has been placed with Mr. 
Whiteley's other horses in Levi Turner's stable. 

Francis Smart, who owns the fast Colorado mare 
Lottie Smart, that beat all tho fast pacers at the 
Denver meeting, has reconsidered his intention of 
withdrawing her from the track and will send her over 
east and try to secure the pacing record for mares 
with her. The record is held by Lady of the Manor 
2:04i{. The record of Lottie Smart is now 2:08. 

Anzella 2:18], the bay mare entered at the Breeders 
and Los Angeles meetings in the fast trotting purses, 
is by Antrim 5918, out of Hazel Kirk by Alwood. 
Her record was made last year at Hedrick, Iowa, in 
the fifth heat of a race where she beat Phoebe Onward 
2:12.1 and Liege 2:12}. It was one of the most hotlv 
contested races on the Mississippi valley circuit last 
season. 

The Woodland Fair Association has elected A. C. 
Stevens, President, Jr. Ruth Jr. Vice President, T. B. 
Gibson Treasurer and C. F. Thomas Secretary. Mr. 
Stevens is an active, energetic man, who is deeplj in- 
terested in the success of the annual district fair, with 
the very efficient Secretary, Mr. Thomas, will con- 
stitute a team that will make the fair of 1901 one of the 
best ever held in Woodland. 



Dr. Hammond, tho big chestnut pacer by Chas. 
Derby, dam Belle 2d by Nutwood, owned by Captain 
Bennett, worked a mile at San Jose two weeks ago for 
Will Webh in 2:09. Several watches caugrht the mile 
in 2:081. Dr. Hammond was foaled in 1894 and is a 
mature, sound horse. He is showing so well that it is 
probable he will not be started this year, but held over 
for the Grand Circuit of 1902. 



John Hussey is doing wonders with the Patchen 
Wilkes Farm horses, and he recently created a sensa- 
tion at Louisville, with the green trotter Prince Selma, 
by Bow Bells 2:19}, dam Cora F. 2:20}. This horse is 
a wonder. He gave the track a new record for green 
trotters in 2:12-1, going every quarter practically alike. 
Hussey also worked a filly by Wilton, out of the dam 
of Prince Selma, a mile in 2:20]; a three year old sister 
to Beuzetta, in 2:26; Frank Herdic, by Patchen Wilkes, 
in 2:22; a three year old pacing filly, by Onward, in 
2:20; a green filly by Patchen Wilkes, in 2:20}; a pacer 
by Director 2:17, dam Mary Marshall 2:12$, in 2:19; 
Axtellion 2:251, by Axtell, in 2:26, and a four year old, 
by Onward, in 2:28. 

Frank Dale, the two year old trotter by Chas. Derby, 
which John Blue purchased for Ed Gaylord and which 
was so seriously injured during the meeting at Over- 
land that it was feared ho would never be able to start 
again, has shown such wonderful improvement under 
the care of Dr. Dunleavy that he was worked last 
Saturday for the first time since the accident. He 
does not' show any signs of a permanent injury and 
Mr. Gaylord is so pleased with his condition that he 
has decided to start him again this fall. The horse 
trotted his first race before a crowd during the Over- 
land meeting and, after winning a great race, he be- 
came frightened, roared up and fell over on his back 
and sustained such injuries that it was hard work to 
get him back to the stable. It was thought for a time 
that the injuries would prove fatal. — Denver Times. 

C. G. Ritchie, a well known uorseman and trainer of 
Lexington, Ky., recently mot, a tragic death. In the 
morning Mr. Ritchie took the pacer Crapshooter out 
to jog, and had driven him for some time and was 
nearing his home, when he discovered that a boot was 
about to fall from tho horse's foot. Mr. Ritchie dis- 
mounted from the sulky and stooped down to fasten 
tho boot. While in this position the horse became 
frightened and suddenly started and kicked Mr. 
Ritchie in the right temple, rendering him unconscious. 
He was carried to his home, that was only a short dis- 
tance away, where he died in a very short time. Mr. 
Ritchie was forty-five years of age and leaves a wife 
and four children. His skull was not fractured, but 
death was caused by the bursting of a blood vessel. 
Crapshooter ran away, but was headed at the city 
limits. 



Hal B., Coney and Anaconda have all stepped quar- 
ters bettor than .'50 seconds this year. 



There are thirty entries in the 2:20 pace at Los An- 
geles. It should result in a great race. 



Several good purses for harness horses are adver- 
tised by the State Agricultural Society to-day. 



The State Fair announces several harness purses in 
this issue. Entries to the same will close July 27th. 



C. E. Clark's mare Sue by Athadon won at Pekin, 
111., last week, and trotted three heats better than 2:15. 



Guideless pacers are not heard so much about now. 
The ''regulars" aro popular enough to draw the people. 

Yarrum 2:10}, Ed Gaylord "s very promising trotter, 
is laid up with a sprained ankle and may not be started 
again this year. 

The llorxeman says that John A. McKerron reduced 
his record from 2:12} to 2:10 on June 27th in the office 
of the National Trotting Association. 

Chas. Marvin recently worked his green trotter, 
Captor, by Electric Bell, a mile in 2:14, and his M. and 
M. candidate, Chase, by Keeler, one in 2:17. 

There will be two "Black Cecils" on the Grand Cir- 
cuit this year. One has a record of 2:15} and is a 
trotter, while the other is a trainer from California. 

Eleata, by Dexter Prince, Maplewood Farm's can- 
didate for the M. and M., is reported to have trotted a 
mile in 2:121 and a quarter in 30 seconds, in her work 
at Dover. 



Murray Howe, Secretary of the Memphis track, was 
recently operated on for appendicitis, but is now up 
and around as usual, and striving to make the Mem- 
phis meeting the best ever held in the United States. 

Powers county, Colorado, is inaugurating a county 
fair, and proposes to construct an ideal regulation 
track. It will be located at Lamar, Coioraao, and it 
may bo that a track will be built and a meeting held 
this year. 

Katie Collins, sister to John R. Gentry 2:001, 
Theodore Shelton 2:09i| and Myron McHenry 2:15}, is 
in foal to Chimes, sire of The Abbot 2:03}. She is the 
property of J. M. Battle, a manufacturing pharmacist 
of St. Louis, Mo. 

Thos. Clancy, of Seattle, was at Pleasanton last 
week looking at his horses, which are being worked 
for the California circuit by S. K. Trefry. Direct C. 
and Freddie C. are both doing well and should be 
money winners this year. 



Anaconda worked four miles at Readville, June 28th, 
in 2:10, 2:05|, 2:06 and 2:091. A half was paced in 1:00 
and a quarter in 29 seconds. If any horse breaks into 
the two minute class this year it will probably be tho 
California bred son of Knight. 

The entry lists received by the Breeders and the Los 
Angeles Associations show that there are enough 
horses in training in California to make the best season 
of racing hold here for many years. Had tho an- 
nouncements of purses been made three months earlier 
there would have been twice as many horses trained. 

A letter from Denver states that W. G. Durfee 
worked Charley Mac two miles, one in 2:13} and the 
other in 2:14, after he|was shut out the first heat of the 
2:17 trot. The cause of his being behind the Hag was 
the throwing of two shoes just after getting the word. 

Ed Benyon has not commenced to work the Walnut 
Hall Farm horses fast, miles in 2:25 being about tho 
fastest he has called upon them to step. This string 
of Futurity winners and great prospects will be seen at 
only two meetings this year, those at Cincinnati and 
Lexington. 

The veteran Billy G. 2:18}, by Hotspur Chief, trotted 
his 101st race at Newburg, Mass., last week, and took 
off third money. Few horses can show the remarkable 
record of this old campaigner, who in ten years has 
started 101 times and only been behind the money six 
times. He is now 15 years old, but is apparently good 
for several more campaigns. 



Last week Geo. H. Ketcham sold one of the best and 
most promising two year olds that over crossed the 
Atlantic. This youngster is Creocia, by Cresceus out 
of the dam of Clara D. 2:14} by Cuyler. The youngster 
goes to Mr. Walter Winans, of Puckley, England, 
who paid $2500 for the youngster, and gots a good one. 

The Kentucky trainer, Gus Macey, says that his 
green five year old gelding Country Jay, by Jay 
Hawker 2:14:|, dam Paronella by Parkville, is doing all 
he has asked him to do, and in a way that makes him 
think that he is going to have one of the best horses 
he ever drove, and he does not bar even Beuzetta or 
ttoraima, both of which he drove to fast records. 

Joe Smith, the well known trainer, was thrown from 
his sulky at Vallejo two weeks ago and suffered the 
fracture of a rib. While driving a colt around the 
upper turn where the track is graded, a greyhound in 
chase of a jack rabbit suddenly jumped in front of the 
colt, which in turn jumped tho fence and fell over the 
grade. Mr. Smith is around as usual and his injuries 
were not serious. 

Det Bigelow has entered the employ of Judge Col- 
burn, of Colorado Springs, and will campaign a few of 
that gentleman's horses in the Mississippi Valley cir- 
cuit, together with his own mare Tags 2:13. The 
Judge has secured the services of one of the most relia- 
ble and best trainers in California and as the Colburn 
string has some young crackerjacks in it, we do not 
doubt but it will be successful. 



Miss Logan 2:06.1 is the fastest mare that has pro- 
duced standard speed. Alix 2:03!}, Nancy Hanks 2:04 
and Beuzetta 2:06 of the trotters have.no representa- 
tives in the list as yet, neither have Lady of the Manor 
2:04}, Hetty G. 2:05}, Lenna N. 2:0.5}, Lottie Loraine 
2:05:1, The Maid 2:06}, Babv Ruth 2:06], Edith W. 
2:06$, Fanny Dillard 2:06}, Eyelet 2:061, Choral 2:06.1, 
Pearl C. 2:061 and Pearl Onward 2:061, of the pacing 
brigade, and these are the, only marts that have rec- 
ords as fast or faster than the daughter of Gen. Logan. 
Her son Harry Logan now has a record of 2:12] made 
at Denver in his second start. 



The Gentlemen's Driving and Riding Club of Denver 
held an afternoon of matinee racing on Saturday, July 
6th. It was held over the half milo track and fur- 
nished great sport for the large crowd that was in at- 
tendance. The first race had but two starters, Trilby 
P., and Trma Electrite, but it took five heats to decide 
it. Ima Electrite took the first and third heats and 
Trilby P. the other three. Mr. Roberts drove his 
mare while Mr. Gaylord handled the daughter of 
Electrite. The fastest heat of the race was the fourth 
which was in 1:071 and the slowest was the last in 1:10J 
Three other races were decided during the afternoon, 
all furnishing good contests. 



The 2:09 pace at Los Angeles should make a hot race 
if the live horses entered all keep right and are able to 
start. Those that have been named for this race are 
Kelly Briggs2:10], Myrtha Whips 2:10i{, Floracita 2:111, 
Delphi 2:12] and Edna R. 2:113. Floracita is said to be 
better than ever this year and Kelly Briggs is thought 
to be better than 2:10, while Edna R. showed in her 
race at Oakland on the Fourth that she is fully as 
good as she ever was in her life. Delphi and Myrtha 
Whips can be depended upon to pace heats in 2:10 
when right and are both in excellent shape to begin 
the campaign. If these five pacers come together- 
there will be a great difference of opinion as to the 
probable winner and a large sum of money will cer- 
tainly bo wagered on the race. 

The three year old sister to Central Girl 2:22], which 
P. W. Hodges has been working for the past few 
weeks at San Jose, has made speed very fast for a 
youngster. She began taking work in April and 
worked a mile on the 27th of that month in 2:39. On 
May 25th she showed a mile in 2:38, four days later- 
one in 2:33 and two days later one in 2:301. On June 
8th a milo in 2:291 was trotted by this Slly, June 15th 
one in 2:29, June" 22d one in 2:281, Juno 30th one in 
2:27, and on July 6th worked three heats in 2:361, 
2:29.1 and 2:24, the last quarter of the last mile in 35} 
seconds. The filly seems to have more speed every 
time she is worked and will soon be trotting miles 
below 2:20. Another three year old by Nutwood 
Wilkes 2:161 that is showing speed of a high order is 
T. C., also the property of the Nutwood Stock Farm. 
He stepped a mile in 2:23$ at San Jose last Saturday. 



July 13, 1901] 



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THE SADDLE. 



Saddle Notes. 



Seven thousand people attended the races at Butte 
on the Fourth of July. 

Clarence Mackay, it is said, paid Sam Hildreth 
$12,000 for Brunswick, the son of St. Carlo. 

There are three books on at the Butte meeting. 
Auction pools are well patronized, but the mutuals are 
neglected. 

Gus Abercrombie has engaged jockey B. Gouin to 
ride for him during the Montana meetings. Gouin has 
been riding in Chicago, but reached Butte last week. 



Robert Waddell won the Oakwood Handicap at 
Washington Park, on June 29th, one mile and a fur- 
long, in 1:52 3-5. The Conqueror IT. was second and 
Advance Guard third. 

Ezekiel D. Mosman, a well-known horseman and 
trainer of this Coast, died at San Jose last Sunday 
after an illness of six months. He was 63 years old 
and a native of Illinois. 



Jockey Bullman met with an accident while enjoying 
a swim at a Chicago natatorium one evening last week, 
and was so shaken up that he rode in but one race, the 
last one, on the following day. 

"Dave" Gideon, July 2d, purchased John Daly's 
interest in the Holmdel Stud, N. J., and he is now the 
sole owner. Mr. Gideon has also purchased Glennellie 
and several other horses from Mr. Daly. The terms 
are private. 

Vagrant, chestnut colt, 2, by imp. Watercress-Tho 
Truant, and Bonita Belle, dam of Beau Gallant, the 
property of R. Croker, and Beau Imperial, the year- 
ling brother of Beau Gallant, were shipped to England 
on June 29th. 

The following jockeys were at the Yreka meeting 
last week: Tom McNichols, M. B. Breden, Doc Powell, 
R. Golden, B. Kelley, R. Hobart, R. Rogers, P. Ben- 
nett, O. Olsen, Milt Halsey, W. Gilbert, E. Irwin, A. 
Everson and J. Harris. 



At the St. Louis race track on June 29th the start- 
ing was poor, the send off in the fifth race being so 
inexpressibly bad that there was quite a demonstration 
by the crowd. As a result Starter Bruen resigned and 
A. B. Dade has been appointed to officiate at the Del- 
mar meeting, which opened Monday. 

Walter Hobart recently purchased from L. C. 
Williams, of Colorado, the fast quarter horse Silver 
Dick. This horse is very fast for a short distance. He 
was bred by the Caviness brothers, celebrated outlaws 
of New Mexico and Texas. He came by his running 
qualities through heredity, as his sire, Billy Caviness, 
was one of the fastest short distance horses. that ever 
raced in Texas. 

Goodwin's Official Turf Guide, No. 6, just issued 
carries the record of racing East and West up to date, 
the volume including the usual indexed form tables for 
the Sheepshead Bay meeting up to the opening of the 
July meeting. All the other features of the work, the 
table of jockeys' mounts, dates of meetings, and im- 
portant foreign fixtures and statistics of the various 
American tracks are included in the book. 



A Butte, Montana paper, thus refers to Starter R. 
J. Havey: Starter Havey is possessed of more than the 
usual patience. He has been sorely tried at the post 
by bad actors on more than one occasion and yet he 
has not been severe. More than that he tries and tries 
again until he can get the field off well. Many a 
starter would become disgusted and drop his flag on 
any old kind of a start simply to get them off and have 
done with them. 

The temporary passing of Ethelfcert brings to mind 
the number of crack thoroughbreds that have gone 
wrong this year. Clarence H. Mackay's Banastar, cut 
down in the Brooklyn Handicap, is a cripple. Kinley 
Mack, winner of the Brooklyn and Suburban Handicaps 
last year, has gone to the stud. So has Standing, 
another flyer in his day. Ballyhoo Bey, of which 
great things were oxpected after he had won the 
Futurity last season, has turned out to be a "roarer" 
and will never run again. Verily, the turf loses four 
stars in these racers. 



The innovation of book making, which is being tried 
at Butte, is thus referred to by the Inter-Mountain: 
"Syndicate booking does not meet with the approval 
of the betting fraternity. There is absolutely no com- 
petition and the talent is forced to tako the odds 
posted on one book or do without, as the other books 
will offer nothing better. In fairness to the patrons 
of any race track the management should throw the 
betting ring open and give its patrons at least a run 
for its money. A 'grab-all' game will certainly not 
make racing popular." 

Coburn, the well known jockey, had his left leg 
broken above the anklo at Washington Park ono day 
last week. The accident happened in a peculiar man- 
ner. Coburn had the mount on Emma C. L., and 
while maneuvering for position Educate, with Knight 
up, whirled suddenly, its hip striking Coburn's leg. 
Coburn was conveyed to the paddock and his injury 
attended by Dr. Morrow, the track physician, and 
later he was taken to the Chicago hospital. In the 
opinion of tha doctor it will be two months before the 
jockey will be able to ride again, and in the meantime 
the Bennett stable will have to secure the services of 
another rider. 



Bonita Belle, recently purchased by Mr. Richard 
Croker from Mr. W. S. Barnes, was shipped to New 
York Tuesday June 25th, en route to England, where 
she is to be bred to Flying Fox. The mare is 10 years 
old, by Falsetto, out of Bonita, by Lexington, and she 
cost Mr. Croker $12,500. At the same time he bought 
her weanling foal, Beau Imperial, by Prince of Monaco 
entered in the Guineas, Derby and St. Leger, in Eng- 
land for $6000. He was shipped with the mare. 

The stewards of the Coney Island Jockey Club have 
done a wise thing in appointing two patrol judges in- 
stead of one, because even with a glass one man can't 
see all that occurs during a race If they would have 
a report from each judge, whether complaint of foul 
riding is made or not, it would be a good idea. Too 
much can't be done to discourage careless and reckleis 
riding and nothing so demoralizes a young jockey as 
to have his claim, when he knows he has been fouled, 
passed over lightly. It encourages him to do the 
same thing. 

Hatopsa, a full sister to Mesmerist, won the Vernal 
Stakes for two year old fillies at Sheepshead Bay July 
1st, defeating some of the best fillies of the year in a 
romp. A New York writer says: "She made all the 
fillies in the Vernal look like toy thoroughbreds. She 
bid them a pleasant adieu at the start, picked up her 
skirts and they heard nothing more from her until 
they met again upon their return to the stewards. 
After they had gone three furlongs and a half O'Connor 
had to turn h^lf way round in his saddle to see if they 
were following. Don't know how fast this full sister of 
Mesmerist is, but she will give all the star fillies a 
merry game, not excluding Blue Girl, and the chances 
are that she will make most of the colts dizzy when 
she tackles them. She has not been asked to go over 
five furlongs as yet, but if she can hold her present 
speed for six or seven furlongs there is no telling how 
far she will beat anything that she is stacked against." 

The public's opinion of the best three-year-old was 
changed decidedly on the Fourth of July, when 
" Dicky" Wilson's colt, The Parader, won the Law- 
rence Realization, the greatest stake of the year for 
three-year olds and upward, from James R. Keene's 
colt Commando, at Sheepshead Bay. If any one of 
the 25,000 persons present had said early in the day 
that The Parader would beat Commando, in all proba- 
bility he would have been laughed at. Commando 
raced all he knew how to beat the possible runners up, 
and The Parader, well ridden by Patsy McCue, came 
on in the last half mile, and a full quarter of a mile 
from home challenged the favorite and then went on 
and won very comfortably by two lengths. It was the 
greatest disappointment of the holiday, and with it 
one of the most unexpected. McCue, the rider of the 
winner, has been practically out of the game for more 
than a month. His riding alone, however, kept The 
Parader straight, and The Parader ran the best race 
that he was capable of. 

Pierre Lorillard, the millionaire tobacconist and 
owner of thoroughbreds, died in New York, July 8th. 
Mr. Lorillard 's recent severe illness dated from June 
20th. He was in England, and went to his lodge at 
Ascot, hoping to see his horse, David Garri3k, win the 
Gold Cup. He was stricken with a uraemic chill, and 
was sick for a week. He was advised to come to 
America, and boarded the Deutschland, but his condi- 
tion became graver each hour. His physician, Dr. 
Kilroy, told him he did not think he would live to get 
to New York, but the magnate insisted that he would. 
Various estimates have been made of the value of Mr. 
Lorillard 's estate and, while its exact value at the 
present time is not known, it is believed it is more than 
$25,000,000. As long ago as 1884 it was said to be from 
$15,000,000 to $20,000,000. Mr. Lorillard was the first 
American to win the English Derby, which he did in 
1881 with Iroquois. He started the son of Leamington 
in the Two Thousand Guineas that year and was de- 
feated by Peregrine, but turned the tables on this 
horse in the Derby. Iroquois also won the St. Leger, 
Peregrine having been withdrawn. 

The great race horse and sire Hindoo died at the 
home of his owners, Clay & Woodford, at Paris. Ken- 
tucky, July 5th. Hindoo was by Virgil, son of Vandal, 
and out of Florence by Lexington. He was bred by 
D. Swigert at the Elmendorf Stud, Ky., and foaled 
1878. He was the sensational two year old of his year, 
starting in nine races, winning seven, was second once 
and third once. As a three year old he won eighteen 
out of twenty races, and as a four year old won five 
out of six races. There is no question but Hindoo was 
one of the best race horses that has ever appeared in 
this country. He was a grandly bred horse, his grand- 
sire being the best son of imp. Glencoe. Through both 
sides of his pedigree he got a large infusion of Diomed 
blood, together with a double cross of imp. Buzzard, 
fortified by stout crosses of Whalebone, Herod and 
Eclipse on the dam's side. He was a great success in 
the stud, and his son, the great Hanover, in turn 
sired the great Hamburg. Hindoo traces to the 
Holmsley Turk mare, to which trace in the direct 
female line, Starling, Camel, The Baron, sire of Slock- 
well, Rataplan, etc. 

At the close of the recent meeting at Denvor the 
Times of that city said: "Tho races are over and the 
management cannot receive too much credit for the 
kind of sport that has been furnished the public during 
the meeting. It was many per cent bettor than any 
that has over boon soon in Denver before, and has 
croated a new interest in racing that will do tho game 
good for many years to come. There is no doubt that 
tho peoplo of Denver know good sport when they see 
it, and that they appreciate it. More peoplo attended 
the races in three days this year than in two weeks 
last year. The running races woro made a feature of 
the meeting, and there can bo no doubt that good run- 
ning races is what the majority of racegoers want. 
The harness races were good, but after seeing tho run- 
ning races won by a head, the finishes in the harness 
races by lengths seemed tame. Mr. Gaylord, who put 
the meeting through, says: 'I guess there can be no 



complaint regarding the character of the races this 
year, but next year they will be much better. We will 
offer larger purses and have some stake ovents for 
runners, which will attract even a better class than 
has been seen here this season.' Tho management of 
the track has a five year lease, and this is sufficient 
guarantee that the best races possible in this end of 
the country will be given. The value of the Colorado 
Derby will be largely increased next year, and it is ox- 
pected that the class of horses entered for it will be 
much higher than this year. The fact that four new 
track records were established in the running races 
and a new record for Colorado mares in the harness 
events shows that the racing was of a higher class than 
it has been before." 

N ow that the starting machine has battered down 
prejudice in England, there can be no harm in stating 
that even so experienced a sportsman as Admiral Rous, 

once held the opinion that "any d d fool cjuld start 

a field of horses." One day he tried the feat himself, 
and— well, here's the story: For the Royal Hunt Cup- 
in 1861, Admiral Rous made his maiden bow with tho 
starter's flag, and a nice mess he made of it. There 
had been a lot of complaints just before this time as to 
the way the starting had been accomplished, and the 
Admiral took the duty on himself. It was scarcely 
wise under the circumstances to commence on a field o'f 
thirty-three runners, this being the number in Bucca- 
neer's year; but, boiling over with wrath and indigna- 
tion, down strode the gallant old salt to the starting 
post, flag in hand, thinking his appearance alone in the 
position of starter would strike terror and dismay into 
the hearts and minds of the hitherto unruly jockeys. 
So far from this being the case, he absolutely had not 
the slightest control over them, and such a scene as 
ensued was probably never witnessed at tho starting 
post. .TimGoater especially was determined not to get 
It J ft, and at last after an hour's delay, and when if pos- 
sible, the animals were in a worse position to be started 
than they had been at any time previously, Admiral 
Rous, who was completely livid with rage, literally 
through down the flag, shouting at the same time at 
the top of his naturally strong and rough voice: "Co, 

and be d d to you!" Goater got a flying start, anil 

being on a very speedy horse and quick beginner, 
rapidly added to his lead, was never headed, and won 
in a cantor with the then big weight of 8st 711). This 
was Admiral Rous' first and last attempt at starting. 

A Million Dollars for Thoroughbreds. 

The Fasig-Tipton Company, of New York, have had 
great success with their thoroughbred sales, says the 
Thoroughbred Record. Up to the present time they 
have sold at auction $1,018,285 worth of thoroughbreds. 
Below will be found the list: 

January 30 and 31— Stallions, mares and horses lin training 

for Marcus Daly Estate. 184 head (404,650 

May 11— Combination sale, Morris Park, horses in training, 

16 head 4,505 

May 24— Yparlings for MarcusDaly Estate, 55 head 51,525 

June 4— Yearlings for Clay & Woodford, 20 head 54,425 

June 5— Yearlings for Barnes and Lyne, 23 head 21.525 

June 10— Yearlings for H. P. Headlev and others, 24 head. .. 22,025 
June 12— Yearlings for George H. Whitney, C W. Moore 

and others, 16 head !i,«00 

June 13— Yearlings for Williams & Radford and E. C. 

Cowdin, 20 head 15,380 

June 14, 15, 17, 18 and 19— Yearlings from Rancho del Paso. 

J. B. Haggin, owner, 201 head 234,025 

June 17— Yearlings for Gen. W. H. Jaekson and E. S. 

Gardner, 32 head S6,0BO 

June 20— Yearlings from Elmendorf, J. B. Haggin owner, 

18 head 26,500 

June 21— Yearlings (in Chicago) for Chas. & A. J. Reed and 

others, 36 head 13. 100 

June 26— Horses in training for C. Littlefield, Jr.. 99 head.. . 81,750 
Juno 29— Yearlings for Gideon <(• Daly, Holmdel Stud, 16 

head '. 34,725 

Total $1,018,285 



The steeplechaser Ronkonkoma, recently purchased 
by Thomas W. Lawson, has broken down and will 
not likely start again. 



Horse Owners Should. Uso 
GOMBATJLT'S 

Caustic 
Balsam 

The Great French Veterinary Remedy. 

A SAFE, SPEEDY AND 
POSITIVE CURE. 




SUPERSEDES ALL CAUTERY Or FIRING 

Impossible to produce anv scar or blemish. The 
safest best Blister aver ve<\. Takes the wlao« 
of all linime:its for mild or bovth nct : on. Removes 
b 1 1 Hunches or Blemishes from Horses or Cuttle. 

As a HUMAN REMEDY for Rheumatism, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, Etc, it u inva.uable. 
HfC PIIADHIITrC that one tnblesponnful ot 
nt UUAnAEI I LC CAUSTIC BALSAM wil' 
produce more actual results than a whole bottle o< 
any liniment or spavin cure r \Uture ever made. 

Every bottle of Caustic L.al««am sold is Warrau 
ted to (five satisfaction. 1'rice 8 I .50 per bottle. Hold 
4y druggists, or sent by express, chances paid, with ful 
directions for ite. use. Send for descriptive circulars 
testimonials, eta. Address 

tHE LAWRENCE-WILLIAMS CO.. Cleveland, Ohio 



8 



[July 13, IfO 2 



1 GUN ■ 

Coming Events. 

July 13, 14— Blue Rook Tournament. Sacramento. 
July 14— Olympic Gun Club. Live birds. Ingloside. 
July 14— San Francisco Gun Club. Blue rocks. iDgleside. 
July 14— Empire Gun Club Blue rocks. Alameda Junction. 
July 21— Olympic Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 
July 21— Washington Gun Club. Blue rocks. Washington, Yolo 
county. 

July 23, 24 , 25, 26 — Second Annual Grand American Handicap 
Tournament. Blue rocks. Interstate Association. Interstate 
Park. Queens, L. I. 

July 2!' -San Francisco Gun Club. Live birds. Ingleside 
July 2e— Empire Gun Club shoot. Blue rocks. Alameda 
Junction. 

July 28— Capital City Gun Club. Blue rocks. Kimball & Upson 
grounds. Sacramento. 
Aug. 3— Grass Valley Sportsman's Club. Trap shoot and "camp 

stew." 

Aug. 4 — California Wing Club. Live birds. Ingleside. 

It is reported that the deer season in Marin county 
will be shortened two weeks, open season will bo from 
August 1st to September 15th. The open season on 
quail, however, the belief is, will not be curtailed, but 
will be, as provided by the State law, from October 1st 
until February 1st. 

At the Traps. 

The local trap shooting- attractions to-morrow em- 
brace both live bird and blue rock shooting at Ingle- 
side. The Olympic Gun Club members will shoot 
animate targets and the San Francisco Gun Club 
shooters will pulverize inanimate targets. 

Across the bay the Empire Gun Club regular monthly 
shoot at Alameda Junction will be held. 

Sacramento and Northern California sportsmen will 
gather to-day and to-morrow on the Kimball and 
Upson grounds in attendance at the largest trap shoot 
ever pulled off in Sacramento. Cash and merchandise 
prizes, plentiful in amount and of good value and 
utility, will go to many winning guns. 



The California Wing Club live bird shoot on the 7th 
inst. was slimly attended by club members. The birds 
supplied were strong and lively. Tho linal shoot will 
be held next month; the concluding club race will be 
at twenty-five pigeons. The scores made last Sunday 
follow : 

Club match, 15 pigeons, 30-yards rise — 

Walsh, P. J 11212 11112 21211—15 

Feudner, M. O 22122 22222 *2222— 14 

•,Slade" 12111 19*11 21112—14 

Donohue, E 21212 11202 11302— 13 

McConnell, Dr 11102 0120* 1112*— 10 

Justins, H 41*02 22122 1*120—11 

Six bird pool, 30 yards rise — 

Donohue 122212—6 Walsh l**w 

Feudner 211122—6 

Six bird pool, 30 yards rise — 

Feudner 111112—6 Donohoe 21112* 

McConnell 011211—5 

Six bird pool and practice, 30 yards rise — 

Donohoe 22012 11111 12201 10101 2111—20 

Feudner 11212 2 —6 

McConnell 22211 201** 10221 11222 2010— 19 

Fay 22221 22202 20122 11211 2222—22 

Donohoe 21011 11110 212*1 11012 1210—19 



The feature of the Union Gun Club shoot last Sun- 
day at Ingleside was the twelve-man team race be- 
tween the Empire and Union Gun Clubs. This race 
was the second in a series of three shoots for a trophy. 
The first race took place on the Empire Club grounds 
last month and resulted in favor of ths Union Club 
team. The contest on Sunday was a tie shoot, each 
team scoring 177 breaks out of a possible 240 (20 tar- 
gets per man). The tie will be shot off August 4th at 
Ingleside. On Sunday, W. A. Robertson was referee. 
F. Herring represented the Union Club and James P. 
Sweeney wgs judge for the Empire team. 

The first regular club event shot on Sunday was the 
club shoot at 25 blue rocks. Fred Feudner was high 
man with 24 breaks and won first money. M. J. Iver- 
son, H. Schnipper and Pete Claussen divided second 
money. Third money was cut up by F. Herring, J. 
Gordon, R. Cooper and Captain Wollam. T. L. Lewis 
easily won fourth money. In the club handicap medal 
matches Fred Feudner and " U. M. C." tied with 23 
targets each for first medal. R. Cooper and M. Bur- 
nell tied for second medal with 17 each, Cooper win- 
ning in the shoot-off. Hip Justins won the ability 
handicap medal race, scoring 21 out of a possible 25. 
The winners in the added money race were Fred Feud- 
ner first money; Iverson and Gordon divided second 
money. 

Handicap medal race — F. Feudner shot at 25 and 
broke 23; "U. M. C," 26-23; Hoyt, 26-18; Iverson, 26- 
22; Sylvester, 25-22; Burnell, 26-17; Schnipper, 26-13; 
Mitchell, 25-11; Lewis, 30-16; Herring, 28-16: Cooper, 
28-17; Otto Feudner, 25-24. 

Ability medal race, 25 blue rocks — Iverson 20, 
Sylvester 20, McConnell 20, Justins 21, Donohue 19, 
Lewis 17. 

Added monev race, handicap— Walpert, 10 out of 
25; Otto Feudner, 18-20; McConnell, 14-25; Justins, 16- 
23; Doiiohoe, 15-25; Robertson, 16-22; Webb, 18-20; 
Fred Feudner, 21-21; Cooper, 18-28; Gordon, 20-28; 
"U. M. C.," 18-22; Iverson, 20-25. 

Second shoot of the series between the Empire and 
Union Gun Club, 12 men teams, at 20 blue rocks per 
man: 

UDion Gun Club— F. Feudner 17, Sylvester 14, "U. 
M. C." 15, Iverson 18, Walpert 18, Michelssen 11, Bur- 
nell 17, Mitchell 7, Pisani 16, Knick 15, Gordon 15, 
Cooper 14; total 177. 

Empire Gun Club— Hauer 15, La Motte 16, Webb 18, 
Reid 18, Cullen 15, Fish 14. Swales 11, Ireland 14, Juster 
12, Searlsl8, Allen 11, Baird 15; total 177. 



Club match, 25 targets, class shooting — 
Walpert 10111 11110 10111 

Hoyt ooin inio oiuo 

Mitchell 10111 11111 11111 

Janssen 11101 11110 01011 

Hituria 01100 00011 01101 

Burnell 11110 1 1101 OHIO 

"U. M. C." Hill 10110 1(001 

Iverson 11111 11101 10111 

Feudner, F 11110 11111 lllll 

Driescbman 11110 11100 11011 

Knick 11001 lllll 11101 

Jordan 11011 11101 10101 

Herring 011(10 loon (lllll 

Schnipper 01111 01111 01101 

Cooper 001(11 10111 oim> 

Hess lllll 1001(1 10000 

Hoyt 11101 10111 11101 

Burnell. lllll OHIO 00110 

Lewis 01001 01(00 ill 11(1 

Wollam 11011 11011 limio 

Claussen 01011 lllll lllll 

Sylvester lllll 01011 01111 

Michelssen 11010 10101 liillu 

Pisani 01111 moil liilCKi 



lliill 

011(11 

mil 

10111 
limm 
imiiil 
11011 
oioii 
urn 

1UMII 

mil 

10001 
00111 

I llll I 

mill 

111 100 

I I >>i 

10111 

nuim 

00101 

nolo 
iiim 

1011(1 

inn 



00011-18 
10111-17 
11011—23 
11111—21 
10011 — 12 
11111 — 18 
01110—18 
10001 — 19 
11111-24 
00000—14 
11111—22 
10110—15 
01101—15 
10111 — 19 

11110— 16 
111111—14 

11111— 20 
10100—16 
10001 — 10 
10110—15 
11010—19 
11111—21 

11111 — 18 

(11111—18 



The live bird shoot at the Burlingame Country Club 
on tho Fourth was won by W. B. Tubbs, who shot in 
clever form and won the F. J. Carolan cup. Mr. 
Tubbs stopped a number of lively birds with the first 
and showed good judgment in using the second barrel, 
making most of his kills very neat center shots. After 
the club race he continued shooting in six-bird pools. 
He missed his last bird, the thirty-second shot at, a 
loft quartering out going bird from No. 4 trap. His 
record of thirty-one straight is tho high club scoro to 
date; tho previous run was twenty-s#ven pigeons. 
Mr. Ed. Donohoe, who did not compete for the cup, 
also shot in excellent form, killing straight in the club 
race. Fred. Tallant, the cup winner last year, with- 
drew in tho thirteenth round. He had some pretty 
swift birds to bring to grass in the club race. In tho 
pool shoots he scored straight, however. O. H. Lent 
has now the honor of being twice "runner up" for the 
cup. He drew some hard birds, and finally fell out of 
the race in the eighteenth round. W. H. Howard, 
who won the cup two years ago, put up his gun in tho 
tenth round. T. L. Driscoll and J. A. Tobin with- 
drew in the seventeenth and tenth rounds, respect- 
ively. W. B. Bourne was out of form and stopped 
shooting early in the race. Six-bird pool shoots fol- 
lowed the club race. An interested group of ladies 
and gentlemen viewed the shooting and trequently 
applauded skillful shots. Harry Jerome and J. A. 
Folger proved able to do somo trap shooting, if put to 
it. The scores made were the following: 
Carolan cup shoot, 20 birds, distance handicap — 
Yds. 

Lent, G. H 30—22022 11222 02212 202 w — 15 

Howard, W. H 30—21212 mint) w — 6 

Tallant, F. W 30-21112 02011 HOw —10 

Tubbs, W. B 30—22121 11121 12112 22112— 20 

Driscoll, T. A 27—00200 10211 22022 20*w 10 

Tobin, J. P 26— 012a) 21010 w — 5 

Donohoe, Ed 30— 2222-2 21221 11211 22221-2(1 

Bourne, W. B 26— 00000 w — 

First six bird pool shoot, 30 yards rise— 

Donohoe 011120—4 Lent 222111—6 

Tallant 212212-6 

Second sixlbird pool, 30 yards rise — 

Lent 112202—5 Tubbs 113222 -6 

Tallant 121221-6 

Third six bird pool, 30 yards rise — 

Lent 010111—4 Tubbs 111110—5 

There was a good attendance last Sunday at the 
Washington Gun Club's blue rock shoot near the 
American river bridge, Yolo county, and the following 
scores were made: 

Match at 20 blue rocks — Frazee 17, Weldon 15, Kind- 
berg 17, Chapman 10, Gusto 17, Just 17, Black 20, 
Palm 17, Upson 13, Woods 10, Pock 14, Shaw ( J, Young 
13, Bryan 9, Byron 11, Brady 11, Davis 14, Reichert 
17, Wiliiamsll, Newbert 18, Woodworth 13, Ruhstaller, 
Jr., 15. 

Match at 15 blue rocks — Palm 11, Weldon 11, Just 
13, Williams 14, Rust 15, Upson 12, Gusto 14, Frazoe 

11, Kindberg 15, Ruhstaller 11, Black 14, Newbert 14, 
Vetter 13, Peek 15, Wood 8, Davis 5, W<»od worth 8, 
Chapman 9. 

Match at 15 blue rocks — Palm 13, Weldon 11, Just 

12, Williams 11, Rust 12, Upson 10, Gusto 12, Frazee 
11, Kindberg 12, Ruhstaller 11, Black 12, Newbert 14, 
Vetter 12, Peck 9, Woods 15, Davis 14, Woodworth 
10, Chapman 8. 

Club match at 25 blue rocks — 

Newbert Hill lllll lllll lllll 11111—25 

Kindberg Hill lllll 01011 lllll 11011—22 

Keuchler 01 101 11010 01111 01000 11011—15 

Sharp 11100 001(10 1 101 1 lllll 10101—16 

Williams Hill 01111 01011 lllll 01111—21 

Weldon 00101 01111 lllll lllll 11111—21 

Chapman Hill 11110 10110 10111 11110—20 

Adams F 01111 01111 (lllll 10011 11011—19 

Rust 11110 lllll lllll lllll 11111—24 

Adams B 01110 01011 01 1 10 10111 11110—17 

just Hioi iion urn urn iim—23 

Nilan ' 10010 01111 0110! 00110 01011—14 

Stevens Hill lllll lllll lliol 10101—23 

Peek HI 10 11110 lllll ollll 10111—21 

Brown" ' Will 10001 1101101110 01011 — 16 

Blair Will 10000 1101 1 01000 11111—15 

Heilbron Hill lllll 001 11 01011 00010—17 

Frazee 01101 lllll lllll 11110 11111-22 

Flint 10101 10111 11101 10101 11010—17 

Gusto ' Hill 10101 10110 11101 11111—20 

Reichert H100 11101 11001 10111 11111—19 

De Merritt Hlol 11110 11001 mill 11110—19 

Trumpler H010 11011 liooo lllll 01111—18 

Magistrini 11011 11010 lllll 11101 01110—19 

Meredith 00111 01111 11101 01101 11111-19 

Favero H011 01100 11110 101 II 10101—17 

Woods H011 11000 11101 111X11 11101—17 

Young 01111 lllll lllll lllll 11101—23 

Bohn 01111 lllll OI011 11100 11111—20 

Richards Hon 111 10 Olioo lion oil 11— 18 

Hughes mill 11101 11010 lllll 11100—19 

Smith 1110O 10110 10100 00100 00101—11 

Young 1111X1 10001 11110 01001 11101—15 

Mvers 11001 01111 10011 11000 11010—15 

Upson" 11110 11011 1010101110 01110—17 

Palm H101 11011 11110 lllll 11111—22 

Match at 15 blue rocks — Kindberg 15, Keuchler 11, 
Sharp 10, Williams 11, Weldon 9, Chapman 13, Adams 

13, Rust 14, Adams 11, Just 13, Nilan 9, Stevens 12, 
Peek 13, Brown 12, Blair 10, Heilbron 12, Frazee 12, 
Flint 10, Gusto 14, Reichert 12. De Merritt 13, Trumpler 
9, Magistrini 11, Meredith 10. 

Match at 10 blue rocks — Kindberg 8, Keuchler 8, 
Sharp 7, Williams 10, Weldon 8, Chapman 8, F. 



Adams 10, Rust 9, B. Adams 7, Just 9, Nilan 7, Stevens 
10, Peek 8, Brown 4, Blair 5, Heilbron 8, Blemer 7, 
Flint 6, Gusto 10, Reichert 8, De Merritt 4, Trumpler 
8, Magistrini 4, Black 7, Frazee 8, Blemer 9, Flint 6, 
Kindberg 10, Hughes 10, Richards 8, Myers 6, Lom- 
bard 2, Griffin 8. 

The first annual tournament of Visalia Rod and Gun 
Club was held Sunday, June 30th, during an unusually 
warm day. All eight events, as scheduled on the pro- 
gram, were shot and a number of good scores were 
made. Following will be found tho record of winners 
and their prizes: 

Event No. 1, 10 birds, purse $11.50— 1st money, $5.75, 
Thompson and Chatten, score 10; 2d money, $3.45, 
Stone, Giddings, Fesler, Neilson, Murray, Whitley, 
score 9; 3d money, $2.30, O'Neil, Holdsclaw, Weaver, 
Ickers, score 8. 

Event No. 2, 15 birds, purse $15.75 — 1st money, $7.87, 
O'Neil, Chatten, score 15; 2d money, $4.73, Stone, score 
14; 3d money, $3.15, Ickers, Holdsclaw, score 13. 

Event No. 3, 20 birds, purse $19— 1st money, $7.60, 
Stone, Thompson, Giddings. score 18; 2d money, $5.70, 
Foin, Fesler, score 15: 3d money, $3.80, O'Neil, Ickers, 
score 15; 4th money, $1.90, Holdsclaw, Delahanty, 
Neilson, score 14. 

Event No. 4, 20 birds, purse $26— 1st money, $10.40, 
O'Neil, Foin, Giddings, score 18; 2d money, $7.50, 
Stone, Thompson, Delahanty, score 17; 3d money. 
$5.20, Gilmer, score 16; 4th money, $2.60, Neilson, Fes- 
ler, Weaver, score 15. 

Event No. 5, 20 birds, purse $26 — 1st money, $10.40, 
Giddings, score 19; 2d monev, $7.80, Stone, Neilson, 
score 18; 3d money, $5.20, Holdsclaw, O'Neil, Wild, 
score 17; 4th money, $2.60, Foin, Gilmer, Delahanty, 
score 16. 

Event No. 6, 20 birds, purse $31 — 1st money, $12.40. 
Thompson, Giddings, Neilson, score 18; 2d money. 
$9.30, Wild, score 17; 3d money, $6.20, O'Neil, Foin, 
Stone, score 16; 4th money, $3.10, Fesler, score 15 

Event No. 7 was a merchandise shoot and the prizes 
were chosen as follows, the ties drawing by lot for 
choice: Giddings, gun case: Fesler, shell case: Holds- 
claw, sweater; O'Neil, fishing rod; Foin, bottle Ken- 
tucky Taylor; Stone, 100 shells; Ickers, box cigars; 
Thompson, box cigars; Delahanty, whist prize set; 
Osborn, bottle Gilt Edge; Murray, tobacco pouch; 
Weaver, sack flour; Pendergrass, bottle Old Hoss; 
Whitley, leggins; Jensen, purse; Rivers, necktie: New- 
comb, bottle Hunter; Gilmer, handkerchief; Barring- 
ton, pipe; Chatten, reel; Neilson, lunch basket; Over- 
all, 1 dozen flies; Hill, cleaning rod; Dave Cowan, can 
Trophy baking powder. 

Event No. 8, high guns — 1st money, $9.20, Stone: 2d 
money. $6.90, Foin; 3d and 4th moneys, $6.90, divided 
by Wild, Holdsclaw, Thompson, Neilson. 

The initial shoot of the Avalon Gun Club (Catalina 
Island) will take place to-morrow and Monday. Two 
trophies, the Tufts-Lyons challenge medal and the 
Hotel Metropole cup as well as high average prizes are 
offtred. Entrance moneys will be divided 50°o, 30% 
and 20%, after deducting the price of inanimate targets. 
All events will be at known traps, unknown angles. 
The program arranged is the following: 

First day — 15 singles, entrance, $1; 15 singles, en- 
trance, $1; 15 singles, entrance $1; 15 singles, entrance 
$1; 25 singles, entrance $1.50; 15 singles, entrance $1; 15 
singles, entrance $1; 15 singles, entrance $1, 15 singles, 
entrance $1; 25 singles, entrance $2. 

Second day — 15 singles, entrance $1; 15 singles, en- 
trance $1; 15 singles, entrance $1; 25 singles, entrance 
$1; 25 singles, entrance $1.50. 

Two-men team contest, 20 birds, entrance per team $2. 

Lufts-Lyon Arms Co. 's Challenge medal, 50 birds 
per man, entrance $1. Previous conditions to govern. 

Hotel Metropole Trophy contest, 25 birds per man, 
entrance $2. Trophy to remain in possession of Avalon 
Gun club; winner to have name inscribed thereon and 
to receive $20 in cash. Second, third and fourth scores 
to-divide entrance money, 50, 30 and 20 per cent, less 
price of birds. 

The distribution of the moneys at the Walla Walla 
shoot, where the Bennet-Rose or Rose system was 
followed, did not net the shooters anywhere near the 
amount anticipated, too many men were in the division 
to make tho individual win of any consequence. From 
accounts received the money division was unsatisfac- 
tory. This we do not state as any reflection upon the 
management of the shoot, which, by the way, we are 
informed, was very good, but the system of money 
division was not applicable. We mention this for the 
information of some local shooters who have been ad- 
vocating a similar disbursement of purses. 



In connection with the recent international trap 
lihoot the Shrxiting Times says: "In their practice, 
previous to the match, the American team showed the 
style of men they were, and the odds on them at the 
start of the contest were as much as 4 to 1, although 
these odds were somewhat reduced after the first 100 
birds, as the British team were then leading. The 
conditions of the match make it rather difficult to 
make comparisons between the rival teams, the Ameri- 
cans, although limited to the use of only one barrel 
having the right to use l.j oz. of shot and an unlimited 
powder charge, whilst the English could use two 
baraels, but were tied down to an ordinary game 
charge with 1 1-8 oz. of shot. It has been reckoned 
that the extra 1-8 oz. of shot is equivalent to 33 pellets, 
and the heavy charge of powder, there is no doubt, 
gives tremendous smashing power. Notwithstanding 
these advantages, we cannot but think that had the 
teams been equal in skill, the second barrel should 
have given victory to the British. This was proved 
over and over again by the successful use of the second 
barrel, and a comparison of individual scores shows 
that the majority of the American shooters were un- 
questionably far superior in the skillful use of their 
weapons. 

This friendly tournament will, we think, lead to 
changes in the construction of our clay bird shooting 
guns, as well as the loading of cartridges, as the 
Americans have evidently, by continued experiments, 
discovered the best weapons as well as the beet 



July 13, 1901] 



9 



ammunition to use in this kind of sport. Their guns, 
although not bearing comparison in style and finish 
with the best English made guns, yet give extraordin- 
ary close patterns, and are extremely heavy from out- 
point of view. Some of the shells used were 3} inches, 
and contained 3J to 4 drachms of powder, with about 
1 inch of wads, "The shot used was No. 7*. The pro- 
ceedings have so far gone off without a hitch, and the 
meeting of rival teams has been marked by the ex- 
change of the most friendly feelings. The Americans 
are all keen, thoroughbred sportsmen, and there is no 
doubt that they fully deserve their success." 




A further notice in the issue of the above mentioned 
journal of June 22d is the following interesting para- 
graph: 

"The Anglo American Clay Bird Contest at Hendon 
ended, as we anticipated, in a runaway victory for the 
Americans, the home team being quite out-classed 
from start to finish. The American team, it was ad- 
mitted by Mr. Paul North, was composed of the finest 
clay pigeon shooters that America could produce, and 
every individual was provided with the best weapon, 
as well as the most perfect ammunition for the purpose. 
Their guns were 12-bore, choked to 14, weighed 8 lbs. 
or more, with 31 to 32 inch barrels, whilst their car- 
tridges, 3J to Si-inch cases, loaded with 1] oz. of No. 
7£ shot, were wadded with the very best material that 
has ever been seen in this country. The inch or so of 
soft wads in the cartridge was to prevent the escape of 
gases into the shot charge when leaving the muzzle. 
Eight Americans shot with Parker guns, and two shot 
with guns made by the Hunter Arms Co. The Eng- 
lish team used guns by Cogswell and Harrison, Greener, 
Boss, Langley, Boswell, Cashmore, Westley Richards 
and Rigby. Apart, however, from the question of 
arms and ammunition, it must be admitted that the 
English team were much inferior as marksmen. This 
is sufficiently demonstrated by the fact that in the 
first match, which was lost by 65 birds, the British 
team in as many as 150 instances saved the loss of the 
bird by the use of the second barrel, thus proving that 
the second barrel was a most important factor. 

The American team were, we thought, rather slow 
and seemed to follow their birds, but there was no 
doubt about the result when they loosed off. In the 
great majority of cases the bird was fairly struck and 
simply vanished in a puff of dust. This result may be 
explained by the fact that at 40 yards the American 
guns gave a pattern resembling the top of a pepper- 
caster, every pellet being within a circle only 14 inche3 
in diameter. This closeness of pattern, of course, 
speaks more eloquently than words as to the fine shoot- 
ing of the Americans. On Tuesday evening the Amer- 
can team were entertained at a complimentary dinner 
at the Cafe Royal, previous to their departure for 
Scotland, where they have arranged to compete 
against a picked team of Scottish shooters, at the 
Shooting School Grounds at Stobhill, Springburn, 
Glasgow, to-day." 

The last mentioned shoot was also decided in favor 
of the American shooters. The match was at 1000 
targets for a purse of £200. The use of both barrels 
was optional with each team. The Americans broke 
973 targets, the Scotch team 882. Fred Gilbert and 
R. Merrill each scored straight strings of 100, Wm. 
Crosby 99, Tripp, Fanning and Heikes 97 out of the last 
500. The best British individual score was 96. The 
English and Scotch sportsmen present were much sur- 
prised by the accuracy of the American shooters and 
testified their appreciation at the close of the shoot 
with many cheers. 



Trade Notes. 



The popularity of a good single barrel, breech load- 
ing shot gun is attested in the Eastern country by the 
constant and increasing demand for a field gun of this 
description. The utility of a single shot weapon is ot 
a far higher degree than ordinarily supposed. In this 
respect we will call the attention of our readers to the 
announcement of the Remington Arms Company, 
which appears on the last page of this issue. 



In another column we quote a representative English 
sporting journal which unhesitatingly gives credit to 
American guns and American ammunition as a potent 
factor in accomplishing winning results at the traps in 
the recent international shooting matches. |From these 
results of the different contests it would seem that all 
American manufacturers have had an opportunity to 
demonstrate the superiority of American guns over 
guns of English make. The leading and most promi- 
nent guns of foreign make as well as American guns 
were represented on these teams. The highest average 
record was made with an L. C. Smith gun, used by 
"Billy" Crosby. In this connection it can be stated 
that the Smith gun is claimed to hold the world's 
record on clay pigeons, the following scores being 
offered to substantiate the assertion: John Hallo well, 
high gun 1897, 154 straight breaks. Charlie Young, 
high gun 1899, 211 straight; "Jack" Fanning, high 
gun 1900, 231 straight; "Billy" Crosby, high gun 1901, 
345 straight; Mr. Crosby also made the highest aver- 
age during the recent competition "across the herrin' 
pond." 

In regard to the recent Anglo-American shotgun 
arguments at the traps some interesting ammunition 
data is at hand. The American team scored 2586 tar- 
gets out of a possible 3000. The English team broke 
but 2334 (this with the use of the second barrel). The 
majority of the shooters on the American team, in- 
cluding Captain Tom Marshall (twice winner of the 
Grand American handicap), used "U. M. C." shells, 
factory loaded. U. M. C. shells were used by the win- 
ners at 7 out of 9 Grand American handicap tourna- 
ments. The world's record for 100 shots at 100 yards 
was broken by Dr. Ashley A. Webber, on June 26th, 
with fixed ammunition. He shot with a service weapon, 
using factory loaded U. M. C. cartridges, shooting at 
an 8-inch bullseye and scored 790 out of a possible 1000, 



Coming Events. 



i 



July 1— Striped bass season opened. 
July 1— Black bass season opened. 

July 13— Saturday Contest No. 7. Class series. Stow lake 
•J-.30 P. M. 

July 14— Sunday Contest No 7. Class series. Stow lake, 10 A. M 

Dry Fly-Fishing. 

Fly-fishing with the dry fly quite naturally appears 
to be an absurdity on the face of it. It will at once be 
said by the uninitiated that if you cast an artificial fly 
made of feathers, silk, tinsel, and a steel hook on to 
the water it will get wet and sink. Some years ago 
Dr. Prime, author of that pleasant little book, "I Go 
a-Fishing, " said that to keep a fly dry so that it would 
float on the water and not sink or get wet was an 
"impossibility," which only proves that the doctor's 
knowledge of fly-fishing was limited to the old and 
excellent style now called wet fly-fishing. As a matter 
of fact, it is perfectly easy to fish throughout even the 
wettest day with your fly always floating on the sur- 
face, and not merely on still water, but also in a gale 
of wind, when the surface is broken into waves, or in 
a rough stream. 

In 1879 that excellent fly-fisher and English fishing 
tacklb maker, the late James Ogden of Cheltenham, 
published that very useful little work, "Ogden on Fly- 
Tying," and in it he describes how he had introduced 
his floating flies to the angling world forty years pre- 
viously — i. e., about 1840, and also how he discovered 
the advantage of using a dry fly. The passage is very 
interesting and claims a place in any account of the 
history of fly-fishing. He says: 

" Some forty years ago, when I introduced my float- 
ing flies, the love of angling was increasing at the rate 
of ten to one from when I was a lad. I always found 
the more a stream was whipped over, the more wary 
and shy the fish became; and I always made it a rule 
never to leave a good rising fish while he was feeding. 
I have tried every dodge and often every fly in my 
book. By changing my end fly I have occasionally 
(not intending to do so) made a cast with a dry fly. In 
those days it was said this would scare a rising trout 
and cause him to leave off feeding. On the other hand, 
I found while my fly was still on the surface, without 
a ripple, it has tempted the fish to seize it, after I have 
been throwing a sunk fly over him, in vain, scores of 
times. These observations were the cause of my intro- 
ducing floating flies. I found it advisable to use one 
fly only with a shorter casting line." 

It was not until the early eighties — about twenty 
years ago— that dry fly-fishing began to come into 
general use; its use previously had been confined to a 
comparatively few experts on a few streams. Up to 
that time the flies used were, although made specially 
with a view to their floating, attached to gut in the 
old way — i. e., the hook was whipped to a strand of 
gut, and it was found that flies so fastened to the line 
required very careful casting or they broke off. 

The secret of making the fly float was very simple. 
After casting it on the water, you had only to make 
half a dozen false casts in the air and the fly was again 
dry enough to float on the surface over a rising fish, 
instead of sinking at once. But in drying the fly in 
this way it often cracked like a coachman's whip, and 
you found it gone. This was a gr<3at drawback, but it 
was overcome almost entirely by the discovery of that 
keen and accomplished dry-fly angler, H. S. Hall, that 
if the hook was made with a metal eye to attach the 
gut to, it would stand almost any amount of casting 
without cracking off. After numberless experiments 
and a great deal of correspondence in the columns of 
The Field and The Fishing Gazette, he, assisted by an- 
other first-rate angler, George L. Bankart, succeeded 
in getting flies made on special eyed hooks. 

These gentlemen did not invent the eyed hook or 
first use it for trout flies. Wheatley, in his "Rod and 
Line, " published by Longmans in 1859, had fully de- 
scribed the advantages of dressing trout and grayling 
flies on eyed hooks, but Messrs. Hall and Bankart de- 
serve none the less credit for the immense benefit they 
conferred on dry-fly anglers by reinventing and im- 
proving them. Wheatley used them for wet fly-fish- 
ing, for which purpose they are not popular even 
to-day. 

Perhaps next to Mr. Hall's "eyed hooks" the great- 
est aid the dry-fly angler has received was through the 
publication only a few years ago in The Fishing Gazette 
of " The Great Oil Tip," as he called it. Up to that 
time the difficulty was to keep your fly floating on the 
surface, especially on a wet day, when no amount of 
false casting or drying in the air would make it float 
more than for a few seconds. Anglors owe this great 
but very simple boon to a Col. Hawker, who imparted 
the secret to the late Mr. Thomas Andrews, the cele- 
brated pisiculturist of Guildford Mr. Andrews was a 
keen angler, and in one of his contributions to The 
Fishing Gazette he described how tho application of a 
little parafine oil to the fly caused it to float like a duck, 
even on the wettest day. 

The difference between a fly oiled and one not oiled 
is this — the latter requires a far greater amount of 
drying in the air by falso casts between each cast on 
the water, increasing the strain on the wrist and arm 
quite three times what is required with the oiled fly 
even on a dry day. On a wet day your unoilod fly 
soon becomes so waterlogged that you cannot make it 
float, do what you will. The oil makos absolutely no 
difference to the appearance of tho fly, and after a cast 
or two you would not know it was oiled. 



W. J. Street returned Monday from a fifteen days' 
trip to the Yosemite valley. In describing the trout 
fishing he says: "The streams are full of trout, but 
the water was still rather high and fishing not as good 
as it will bo later on. The fish go in on the overflowed 
places and find plenty of feed among the submerged 
grasses and other vegetation. When tho streams run 
low later on there will be plenty of good fishing. How- 
ever, he caught a number of very nice fish; the favor- 
ite flies were the white moth, royal coachman and 
Street's Yosemite fly. The fishing was done generally 
in the evening for best results. He reports the Big 
pool in the Little Yosemite good for both the fly and 
spoon; in about two weeks the angler will find plenty 
of fish. The best fishing will be found in the Emerald 
pool, in the Merced river between Vernal and Nevada 
falls. This pool is full of good sized rainbow trout." 
"Old Man" Snow, who kept the hotel near this spot 
some ten years ago, planted rainbow fry in the pool 
and they have propagated and multipled wonderfully 
well. Street struck this water one morning ahead of 
his party and in an hour he had in his basket twenty 
beauties caught on a La Forge spoon; when the rest of 
the party came up and gathered along the banks fish- 
ing was over. During the twilight in the valley the 
streams and pools are good for a few fish. He did not 
take in the Cascades on this trip. The outing party 
was composed principally of ladies and gentlemen mem- 
bers of the Camera Club. Many grand and beautiful 
pictures were taken by the camera enthusiasts, who 
one and all declared the trip a royal outing from be- 
ginning to end — the only regrets were, that such a 
splendid vacation terminated too soon. 



During Clarence A. Haight's recent northern trip he 
visited Spokane for a few days and was the guest of 
H. G. Lougee, a sportsman well known in this city. 
Mr. Lougee has at his residence there as complete an 
equipment for outing with rod or gun, camping, etc., 
as the heart of the most ardent enthusiast could wish 
for. Lougee put his light camping wagon in commis- 
sion and took Haight off on a three days fishing trip. 
Our two anglers camped each day on the banks of the 
Spokane and morning and evening whipped the stream, 
hooking many splendid rainbows. The largest fish 
taken on the trip was caught by Lougee one evening 
just before dusk, it was a three and a half pound rain- 
bow. The fish usually ran from a half to three-quarter 
pounds in weight and were fighters from start to finish. 
Before returning to Spokane, the sportsmen visited 
Lake Hayden in Idaho, distant forty miles from 
Spokane. Lougee is just as clever with the rod and 
fly as he is with a shotgun. Mr. Haight has expressed 
his enjoyment of a most pleasant trip in no unmeasured 
terms of appreciation. 



Reports from all the striped bass fishing resorts are 
favorable for plenty of sport in salt water. The fish are 
so numerous in the bay that one day shortly after the 
season opened they were being sold in the market at 
one cent per pound. Boswell Kenniff hooked eleven 
fish, weighing 51 pounds, in the estuary on Sunday. 
This water has been the resort of numerous anglers 
daily, many fish have been caught. At Black Point 
and Petaluma creek striped bas3 fishing is first class. 
The Petaluma Gun Club members have had grand 
sport and caught many fish, the club house has been 
crowded to its utmost capacity to accomodate the 
members recently. The "white house" pool at Point 
Reyes is full of striped bass, and big fellows they are. 
Last Sunday Frank Vernon, who had been black bass 
fishing in the lake nearby, tried the "pool" with his 
light tackle and was cleaned out four times, the last 
time his line was all taken and the rod smashed. 



A paragraph in last Sunday's Bulletin taking us to 
task for an alleged statement concerning the edible 
qualities of Klamath river trout is all Greek to the 
editor of this department — if the writer can find any 
matter on that subject recently in the columns of this 
journal we will obligate ourself to lunch; on thistles 
for a month of Sundays. The knowledge of fish and 
angling, close season, etc., as well as some mind read- 
ing talent, displayed by the critic referred to is of 
so convincing a nature as to create laughter on the 
part of anglers and sportsmen. 

The remark attributed to us appeared in the Bulle- 
tin.. A typographical error, the word river instead of 
lake changed the meaning of a sentence, which ex- 
planation we make in a kindly spirit to a writer who 
jumped to conclusions too readily. 



Carp have gradually become such a|nuisance in Lake 
Chabot, that the water company have had, under the 
direction of Fred W. King, a crow of Italian fisher- 
men seining the fish. If this does not prove effective, 
it is proposed to put a few seals in tho lake. After the 
carp are cleanod out it is intondod to stock tho lake 
with 10,000 black bass fry. This water used to be 
worth a visit for a day's trout fishing, but for a long 
time past tho trout in the lake have boon logendary 
and not actual to any great extent. 



A box of trout received yosterday, shipped from 
Truckee, was a kindly reminder from Al M. Gumming 
that ho is still enjoying tho angler's delight at Inde- 
pendence lake. The fish were in splendid condition, 
packod expertly, and were from 8 to 13 inches in length. 



The fly-casters will put out their lines on Stow lake 
this afternoon and to-morrow morning. 

Some new wrinkles in striped bass fishing tackle 
manufactured by Al Wilson are in big demand and 
also a new lot of trout rods, reels, linos, flies and a full 
general lino of up to date outing goods at the H. E. 
Skinner Co, 416 Montgomery street. 



10 



[July 13, 1901 



I KENNEL. | 

Coming Events. 

July 16— Paciflc Advisory Board. Monthly meeting. J. P- 
Norman. Secretary. 

Bench Shown. 

Aug. 27, 28, 29, 30— Pan-American Exposition Dog Show, Buffalo, 
N. Y. E. M. Oldham, Superintendent 

Sept 2, 3, 4, 5— Toronto Industrial Exhibition. Eleventh annual 
Dog Show, Toronto, Can. W. P. Eraser, Secretary and Superin- 
tendent. 

Sept 3, 4, 5, 6— Columbia County Agricultural Society. Inaug- 
ural Show, Chatham, N. Y. M. T. Mason, Secretary. 

Sept. 11, 12, 13, 14— West Virginia Exposition and State Fair 
Association. Annual Dog Show, Wheeling. W. Va. G. O. Smith, 
Manager. 

Sept. 19, 20, 21— Nanaimo Agricultural Association. Bench show 
Geo. Norris, Secretary, Nanaimo, B. C. 

Sept. 24, 25, 26, 27— Middlesex East Agricultural Association. 
Dog Show, Wakefield, Mass. G. B. Kirkpatrick, Secretary Bench 
Show Committee, Boston, Mass. 

Oct. 8, 9, 10, 11— Texas Kennel Club Dog Show, Dallas, Texas- 
Sidney Smith, Secretary. 

Oct 8, 9, 10, 11— Danbury Agricultural Society. Dog Show, Dan- 
bury, Conn. James Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Nov. 27, 28, 29, 3D— Philadelphia Dog Show Association. 3rd an- 
nual show. Philadelphia, Pa. Marcel A. Viti. Secretary. 

Field Trials. 

Aug. 13— Iowa Field Trial Association 4th annual trials. Em- 
metsburg, la. Louis Verveer, Secretary, Des Moines, la. 

Aug. 20— South Dakota Field Trial Association. 2d annual trials 
Sioux Falls, S. D. Olav Haugtro, Secretary, Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Aug. 27— Wisconsin State Field Trial Association. Inaugural 
trials. . Wis. O W. Gothke, Secretary, Centrolia, Wis. 

Sept. 3. 3— Western Canada Kennel Club. Annual trials. La 
Salle, Man. H H. Cooper, Secretary, Winnipeg, Man. 

Sept. 10— Manitoba Field Trials Club. 15th annual trials. Car- 
man, Man, Eric Hamber, Secretary-Treasurer, Winnipeg. Man. 

Oct. 14— Pacific Northwest Field Trial Club. 2d annual trials. 
Wnidby island. F. R. Atkins, Secretary. Seattle, Wash. 

Oct. 29— Monongahela Game Association. 7th annual trials. 
Senecaville, O. A. C Peterson. Secretary, Homestead, Pa. 

Nov. Michigan Field Trials Association. 4th annual trials. 

,Mich. C. D. Stuart, Secretary, Grand Kapids, Mich. 

Nov. Ohio Field Trial Club. 4th annual trials. , Ohio. 

C. E. Baughn, Seoretary, Washington Court House, O. 

Nov. II— Independent Field Trial Club. 3rd annual trials. , 

Ont. W. B. Wells, Honorary Secretary, Chatham, Ont. 



Doings in Dogdora. 

A litter of handsome and promising; Cockers are now 
ready for disposal. Particulars at this otlice. 

A pair of Great Danes are wanted; must bo blue in 
color, the dog not over two years old and tho bitch 
about twelve months. 

Any one desirous of procuring some high bred Bull 
Terrier or Fox Terrier puppfes can do so by address- 
ing the Kennel Editor. 

We have a demand for a pair of young pointers to bo 
sent to the Orient. A local sportsman wishes to buy 
a young Llewellyn setter dog not over a year old, one 
that he can break this fall. 



The Nanaimo Agricultural Association have joined 
tho Pacific Kennel League. A bench show will be held 
at Nanaimo in September. George Norris, Nanaimo, 
B. O, is secretary of the association. 



A preliminary canvas among tho ranks of the local 
fancy brings to light many earnest promises of support 
for the Oakland show in Decomber. Mr. John Brad- 
shaw seems to have many well wishers for the success 
of tho fall bench show. 



Recent experiments in inoculating dogs against dis- 
temper have been wonderfully successful. M. Phisalin, 
a French chemist, has prepared a serum which has 
been proved to be most effective. This serum, says 
the Shunt in<) 'J'iims, lias hern used in the kennels of 
English Foxhounds, with thejresult that distemper has 
been practically prevented. 



Clinton E. Wordon's Derby entry, Lady Jane (for- 
merly Minnie Cummings) by Ch. Joe Cummings out of 
Bessie Perry, arrived hereabout three weeks ago from 
W. W. Titus, Owensville, Ky. She is a handsome 
black, white and tan bitch, and should show up well 
in the January field trials. Her blood lines are of the 
best, going back to Gladstone, Ch. Count Gladstono 
IV, Gath's Mark, Ruby's Girl, and other noted Setter 
cracks. 

The Ladies Kennel Club of California will bo organ- 
ized on Friday evening, July 19th, at 8 o'clock. The 
meeting will be held in the office of the BREEDER AND 
Sportsman. Lady fanciers are invited to attend. 
To those of the fair sex interested and who may not 
find it convenient to be present at tho initial meeting, 
we are requested to announce that Mrs. N. P. Rosen- 
berg, secretary oro tern, 36 Maple street, San Francisco, 
will receive applications for membership or impart any 
further information desired. 



The Pacific Northwest Field Trial Club have elected 
the following officers for the ensuing year: President, 
Dr. J. M. Myers of Tacoma; Vice-Presidents, G. D. 
Potter of Spokane, P. V. Dwyerof South Bend. Frank 
Everett of Chehalis, F. D. Black of Seattle and P. J. 
Pr^tt of La Connor; Secretary, F. R. Atkins of Seattle; 
Treasurer, Julius Redelsheimer of Seattle; Board of 
Governors. R. M. Palmer, Oscar Jones, P. J. Pratt, 
W. J. Miller, J. A. Peebles and H. C. Bromley. 

The club is in a very prosperous condition. The 
next trials will be held at W hid by island, commencing 
October loth, two weeks earlier than last year. Birds 
are very plentiful and a large number of vi-iting 
sportsmen and handlers from without the State of 
Washington have assured Secretary Atkins of their 
intention to be on hand. Any gentleman desiring to 
join the club can do so by sending in his application 
and the yearly dues, two dollars. 



The Oakland Bench Show. 

We are in receipt of the following communication 
from Mr. Norman J. Stewart respecting the announce- 
ment in this journal, of a bench show to be held in 
Oakland in December under A. K. C. rules. 

"The paragraph regarding Oakland show in last 
week's issue of tho Breeder and Sportsman, has 
brought me many lottors from fanciers, asking me if 
the Collie Club was really not going to hold its show 
in Oakland this year. 

Will you kindly therefore grant me permission, 
through your columns, to state definitely that the 
Collie Club will not hold its Fifth Annual Show in 
Oakland this year. 

It was the intention of tho promoters of the Collie 
Club to hold a show in a different town each year, thus 
working up an intorest in thoroughbred dogs in sections 
whore there were no shows and endeavoring to form 
clubs in those towns to continue the work begun by 
the Collie Club. We started with San Jose, moving to 
Oakland next year, where unfortunately we found our 
associates of the Poultry Club such pleasant companions 
to work with, that, forgetting the good intentions of 
the founders of our club, we accepted the invitation of 
the Oakland association and remained. 

The statement of "Occidental" in an Eastern paper 
that our three Oakland shows were financial failures 
and that I paid tho deficit is neither true nor fair to 
the Collie Club. Our object has never been to make 
money, but to try and give a decent little show and 
please the exhibitors. When we have made money we 
have used it to give a better show next year, and when 
we have lost, the deficit has been paid by the Executive 
Committee, who, having the entire management of 
the club in their hands, are held responsible by the 
club for any deficit which may arise in any matter 
undertaken by them. 

Such a combination show as Oakland can never of 
course hope to pay the dog department its proper pro 
rata of receipts. As a drawing card the dogs are 
worth 75° of tho gate, but with the othor departments 
to be considered they have never received, nor can 
thoy expect to receive, more than 3f>" . It is therefore 
scarcely possible to make the dog department a finan- 
cial success. 

The Pacific Kennel League has discouraged such 
combination shows as those given in Oakland as tend- 
ing to decrease the interest and lower tho standard of 
the dog, and desires that in future all its members, ex- 
cept agricultural societies, will confine their shows to 
dogs. 

We hope that Mr. Bradshaw may decide to take 
hold of Oakland show, and assure him of our hearty 
support in doing everything in our power to make it a 

success." 

Queer Foxhounds of Maine. 

The three chief products of Aroostook county 
Maine, are said to bo potatoes, politicians and red 
foxes A year ago Charles E. Oak of Caribou, land 
agent and forest commissioner for Maine, told a legis- 
lative committee that his county could furnish 100,000 
fox pelts a year for ten years without deminishing the 
supply. Hunters from Boston and Worcester, who 
have shot and trapped foxes in Aroostook say that 
Mr. Oak's estimate is too low by half. 

Tho greai wine-red fox that will run for days with- 
out tiring; that will double and turn to laugh at the 
dogs, and then go on refreshed from the exercise, 
reaches fullest perfection in Aroostook county. Of the 
20,000 or 30,000 foxes taken in Aroostook last winter 
more than half were caught in traps. Nearly all the 
others were shot while running before the patient and 
slow-footed hounds that abound in northern Maine. 

Tho Maine foxhound is a hunting machine that was 
developed for a certain purpose. The result of fifty 
years breeding is a short-logged, deep-chested, slow- 
running breed of dogs that will run day and night 
without tiring, a breed that will annoy foxes and cause 
them to run in more or less restricted circles, and 
frighten them enough to cause them to hole. Tho 
Maine hound to bo of value must, also be taught to 
hunt singly, so that if a hunter takes out a half dozen 
dogs for a day's hunt every dog will pick up a track of 
his own and follow it to tho death. It is not a surpris- 
ing feat for a hunter with six hounds to go out in the 
morning and return at night with ten or twelve pelts. 
As the skin of an Aroostook red fox is worth anywhere 
from $1.25 to $2.50, the occupation is profitable as well 
as pleasing. 

To train a hound pup for the dutios he in expected to 
perform requires much time and labor. A dog pup 
that is 8 weeks old and untaught can be bought for $5, 
while the same dog will sell for 876 or $100 after he has 
been educated. No dog is worth having unless his 
master can shift him from one fox's track to another's 
or from a fox's track to a rabbit's and back again, but 
if any dog makes one of these changes without his 
master's consent he is disgraced and punished sevorely. 
It is a point of dog honor among Aroostook hounds to 
chase a fox by day, by night, and on Sundays until ho 
is caught, shot or run to earth. There are dozens of 
dogs In the county that have followed foxes from six to 
ten days without food or rest. Such hounds are be- 
yound value. They have the best the house affords 
while they live and are decently buried— like one of tho 
family — after death. 

Those are veritable dog days. Tho formation of a 
ladies' kennel club and the proposed issuance and pub- 
lication of a Coast kennel journal in the near future — 
so it is rumored — are surely signs of a renewed inter- 
est in our canine friends which we are glad to chron- 
icle. Though just why a brand new journal should be 
put in circulation, when a weekly paper can be bought 
outright for a small figure, thus saving considerable 
expense in putting up a plant, is a proposition we are 
not prepared to answer. To avoid any possible mis- 
conception of the above surmise we do not refer to this 
journal. 



Advice to Beginners. 

(Continued.) 

As to which variety of dog a new beginner may elect 
to go in for will, whatever advice maybe tendered 
him, be guided, no doubt, to a great extent by his own 
individual taste as well as his position and surround- 
ings. It is very advisable, however, to be set against 
taking on the very large breeds, unless he has plenty 
of both room and cash at his disposal. St. Bernards, 
Bloodhounds, Newfoundlands. Mastiffs, Great Danes 
and some other large breeds, are all dogs of a more or 
less imposing description; but to be successful in their 
keep and culture, requires unlimited kennel room, and 
not a little capital. This is in reference to a fancier 
who desires to take one or more of the breeds as a 
hobby; to form a kennel of them for exhibition pur- 
poses — whether for pleasure or profit is immaterial. 
This ground area and finance is not necessary, if only 
one or two at most of the dogs are required as com- 
panions; but, where breeding operations are con- 
templated, adequate kennel and run accommodation 
are an absolute necessity, if success, however small, is 
to be achieved. Breeders are not long before they 
find themselves overstocked with surplus stock, which 
is, perhaps, the greatest drawback with which thev 
have to contend. 

This over-production in the brooding of prize and 
other dogs has long been a bugbear to the breeder, 
and its disposition in any profitablo way, other than 
by destruction, is one of those breeders' problems 
which to-day remains unsolved— and perhaps unsolv- 
able. This being so, it is well to offer a few words of 
warning at the very onset. Tho average proportion 
of profitable animals— that is, dogs of good average 
merit, which in the market, either as show dogs or for 
sporting purposes, will command a price over and 
above cost — which the most successful breeders are 
able to produce, is not a large one; while in the major- 
ity of cases it is very small. The residue, as it may be 
termed, is, if not the ruin of many a konnel, invariably 
the means of sapping the life out of the majority, and 
retarding their possible progress, often culminating in 
the owner throwing up the sponge and clearing out in 
disgust. It is, too, the man with either means or 
magnificent accommodation who is tempted to "run 
on" his puppies, to "see what they will make," rather 
than weed them out and rid them at a sacrifice early 
on in their career. Most breeders are apt to fall into 
this one trap, and as a consequence the market is 
glutted with mediocre specimens which in the mean- 
time have, in tho vernacular of disgusted breeders, 
"eaten their heads off several times over." Better by 
far keep a few Jogs and do them well, and be sure that 
what is kept are good; which will always pay their 
way, and in nine cases out of ten produce a profit. 

Of tho larger varieties tho St. Bernard undoubtedly 
takes precedence for popularity, by reason, no doubt, 
of tho clog's huge proportions, outward beauty, im- 
posing appearance, and, above all, high intelligence 
and nobleness of disposition — coupled with tho fact of 
his lifo-saving deeds being writ upon tho pages of his- 
tory, an imperishable monument of his worth. It 
may, in passing, be of interest to tako note that the 
St. Bernard and the Newfoundland are the only two 
of the very many varieties of the canine species, whose 
nature is to save, not destroy life. All other breeds 
have, by instinct as it were, a tendency to kill. Origin- 
ally, no doubt, there was not this distinction, for the 
dog in his wild, or even semi-wild state — without ex- 
ception — hunted for his food and lived upon the pro- 
ceeds of his prowess in this respect. Not only has he 
been completely subjugated by man, but in the cases 
referred to, his whole nature changed; and now, in- 
stead of his carrying on a system of canine brigandage 
such as we read of in his early history, he has been 
taught to fulfill the nobler mission of saving (not de- 
stroying) human life, and averting human suffering in 
various ways. Who has not read of the St. Bernards 
of the Hospice being sent out from their cozy kennels 
at this historical Alpine home, to carry succor and 
aid to the wayward traveller on the snow-capped 
mountains of Switzerland, or of the Newfoundland 
braving the briny to rescue some unfortunate human 
being from a watery grave? Then again, volumes 
might be written of recorded facts setting forth the 
fidelity of the dog, regardless of his breed, to his lord 
and master -man. A discussion of this portion of the 
dog's history, ihowever, is scarcely pertinent to the par- 
ticular treatise which is at present under consideration 
nor does it como within the legitimate scope of this 
article, although this notice would have been incom- 
plete without mention of this part of the history of 
our four-footed friend, a history which has, no doubt, 
in the closing years of tho present century, in no small 
measure conduced to the great popularity of the dog, 
and caused him to be so prized by the community at 
large in which he is at present held in such high 
esteem. 



The intelligence of the collio is proverbial and it is 
difficult to understand how any shepherd can get along 
without one or two of them. Near Three Creek, Idaho, 
S. A. Newman's bunch of sheep is herdod by two Aus- 
tralian shephei'd dogs. They were suckled by a ewe 
and will go out in any direction. One goes in lead and 
the other drives the sheop. If coyotes come around 
one dog attends to them while the other takes the 
flock to the house. These creatures have not been 
specially trained to this work. In addition to that 
wonderful natural instinct which characterizes this 
breed of dogs, thoy seem to have imbibed from their 
nurse a special affection for their charge. When the 
flock becomes accidentally mixed with any other band 
of sheep on tho range, if uninterfered with these dogs 
will go in and cut out their sheep from the others, one 
of them holding their own charge while the other 
drives back the neighboring flock. They keep all 
cattle or horses from mixing in with or disturbing tho 
shoep. They will attack any stranger who may come 
in among their sheep when on the range. If darkness 
overtakes the sheep at a distance from the ranch the 
dogs will generally stay on guard with them, but it 
has sometimes happened that one would remain in 
charge and the other would come to the house and 
notify the owner. 



July 13, 1901] 



11 



THE FARM. 



Good Advice. 



Dairying is a business and should be 
conducted on business principles. Milk 
regularly, feed regularly, be acquainted 
with the cows, take good care of the 
calves. Don't be afraid to invest a few 
dollars to improve the herd. 

Here is where a great many just com- 
mencing in the dairy business fail. They 
buy cows fresh in the spring. Some of 
them may be good cows, while others will 
want to go dry as soon as the dry season 
comes on. The new beginner will have a 
lot of strippers on hand to feed during the 
winter, get disgusted with the business 
and declare dairying does not pay ; while 
it is not the fault of the business, but the 
cows and the management are to blame. 

I have talked to a few people who are a 
little skeptical in regard to the future 
price of dairy products. Dairymen in 
other states were afraid there would be an 
over production, and they found markets, 
though not so high as in former years, but 
with our improved methods of the twen- 
tieth century, the dairy cow herself, upon 
which the whole business rests, is a differ- 
ent creature from a few years ago. The 
dairyman that has attended an agricul- 
tural college or reads dairy papers, who 
know9 the value of different kinds of feed, 
and what it. takes to make a balanced 
ration is far ahead of the man that does 
everything by guess. The cream separ- 
ator is one of the grandest improvements 
of the age. The time is coming when 
milk pans will no longer be seen around 
the house as the hand separator is fast 
taking their place. With the silo and the 
soiling crops to furnish green feed the 
year around dairying has been changed 
from the drudgery of the past to a pleas- 
ant and profitable business of the present. 

With all these improvements we can 
produce butter much cheaper than our 
forefathers did. 

All that is lacking to-day is the milking 
machine, so that we can touch the button 
and it will do the rest. 



Roots as a Swine Food. 



In the Harvest Fields. 



The Tulare Register gives the following 
scale of wages in force in the harvest 
fields in that county: 

On stationary threshers the separator 
man gets $5 per day, the engineer $3, sack 
sewers $3, forkers $4, fireman $2.50, and 
the other men $2. It costs $80 per day to 
run a good threshing outfit, requiring 
twenty-two men and thirty horses, and 
the thresher gets ten cents per cental for 
doing the work. He has got to have 
pretty good fortune and few fires and 
smash-ups if he makes very much money 
during the season's run. 

On the combined harvesters the wages 
are not so high. The driver is paid $2.50 
per day, and the rest of the men only $2 
with $1.50 for the roustabout. It takes 
five men to man a machine that will cut 
forty acres per day, and if the farme- finds 
the feed for the stock, the cutting will 
cost $1.25 per acre ordinarily, or $1.50 if 
the harvest crew finds ts own feed. 

In both the case of the harvester and 
the threshing outfit the owner feeds his 
own men and the farmer and his family 
are not bothered with the supply depart- 
ment. Horses cost a bit more than they 
did three or fonr years ago, 75 cents to $1 
per span being paid for them now, whereas 
50 cents a span used to be thought good 
enough. 

The greatest Jersey bull that ever lived 
was no doubt Golden Dad. He was born 
May 23, 1888, bred by J. P. Marett, St. 
Saviour, Island of Jersey. He was a solid 
colored bull, with black tongue and switch- 
He was the greatest prize winner ever 
shown in England and has died within 
the past year. There are in America six 
of his sons and sixty-two daughters. Six 
of his daughters have recorded butter tests. 



Prof. H. E. Van Norman and C. S. 
Plumb report as follows on tests of roots 
as food for pigs : In 1898 as high as 24 25 
tons of mangel-wurzels per acre were pro- 
duced at the station at a cost of 85 cents 
per ton when harvested. The r feeding 
value was tested with twelve pigs, seven 
of which were pure bred Chester Whites 
and the remainder Chester White Poland 
Chinas. 

The pigs were weighed only two days 
before the beginning of the test, when 
they were about three months old. They 
were divided into two uniform lots, each 
lot containing three males and three 
females. The test began February 1st and 
closed April 19, 1899. The pigs were con- 
fined in small lots fifteen by thirty feet in 
size, with a comfortable shelter house in 
each lot. 

Dot 1 was fed on a slop consisting of 
corn meal and shorts, 1.2, and cut mangel 
wuizels ad libitum. Dot 2 was fed corn 
meal and shorts only. The pigs were sup- 
plied with water, ashes and salt. Weigh- 
ings were made at the end of each week. 

At the beginning of the test the average 
weight of the pigs in the two lots was 44 
and 46. 1 pounds respectively. The aver- 
age daily gains in the two lots were 4.(11 
and 5.74 pounds respectively. Each lot 
consumed 3.71 pounds of meal and shorts 
per pound of gain. 

In addition to the grain ration, lot 1 ate 
514 pounds of mangel-wurzels during the 
test. Rating the corn meal at 80 cents, 
shorts at 70 and mangel-wurzels at 10 
cents per 100 pounds, the cost of food per 
pound of gain was 2.8 and 2.7 cents re- 
spectively. 

Partial Paralysis of Pigs. 

Investigation at the Ontario agricultural 
college shows that during the winter and 
spring months many pigs become some- 
what paralyzed or lame from an apparent 
rheumatic affection. In paralysis the 
appetite is variable, and the hind limbs 
are so affected that locomotion is scarcely 
possible. In rheumatic affections the 
symptoms are similar to those of paralysis, 
with the exception that the joints are fre- 
quently swollen and sensitive. 

This form of paralysis is usually the 
result of digestive disturbances associ- 
ated with constipation. These digestive 
troubles are due to overfeeding or im- 
proper feeding and lack of exercise. The 
rheumatic troubles are mostly caused by 
improper buildings, poor ventilation or 
damp sleeping places. 

The curative treatment for these affec- 
tions consists largely in correcting these 
faults in diet or surroundings, the use of 
tonic, such as nux vomica, and suitable 
purgatives. Under the head of "Correc- 
tives," the report refers to substances 
which are not strictly foods, but which 
assist in bringing about a|normal digestive 
action. 

Among these substances may be men- 
tianed fresh earth, ashes and charcoal. 
Suggestions are given on proper plans for 
building the piggery so that the damp 
floors may be avoided and proper ventila- 
tion secured. 

Mere is the latest incubator story from 
the Denver Field and Farm. The story 
itself is warm enough to hatch eggs: "It 
is said that Colonel Judson, the great 
grass expert ol the northwest, has in" 
vented an interminable incubator consist" 
ing of a series of chambers or tunnels 
heated to the proper temperature, through 
which a sort of endless chain- traveling 
conveyor meanders, which is kept supplied 
automatically with eggs from a hopper at 
one end. Its speed is so timed that the 
eggs are hatched just as they reach the 
other end. so that a stream of eggs is con- 
stantly flowing into one end of the ma- 
chine and a line of chickens always com- 
ing out at the other. The machine is to 
be operated by water from a hot spring, 
which also f rniahea the necessary heat 
to hatch the eggs and it runs day and 
night and never gets weary." 



About Cream Flavors. 



Cream may be ripened, and ripened 
completely, without its becoming acid in 
the slightest degree. It is probably true 
that in the best quality of cream ripening 
acid should be produced, but its produc- 
tion is not the chief factor in butter flavor. 
The butter aroma which appears in the 
butter is the result of the ripening process. 
Sweet cream butter does not have this 
delicate flavor. During ripening certain 
changes take place in the cream, some of 
which we understand, and others which 
are at present beyond the reach of chem- 
ical knowledge. The composition of 
cream, except in the higher proportion of 
fat, is essentially the same as that of milk. 
It is made up chiefly of the butter fat in 
the form of globules of casein in partial 
suspension in the liquid, of milk sugar 
solution and of a small amount of albu- 
men, probably in the form of a delicate 
network of fibres, which we call film. 

By the time the cream has reached the 
cream jar it contains organisms varying 
widely with temperature and other con- 
ditions, and it is to these that the subse- 
quent ripening is due. If kept at a mod- 
erately warm temperature, say 60 to 65 
degrees, the bacteria grow rapidly, and 
during the 24 hours or so of ripening in- 
creases enormously, and at the end of the 
ripening period the number of organisms 
varies with the time of the year. In the 
winter the cold weather keeps the bacteria 
from growing rapidly, and the cream con- 
tains a smaller number of bacteria than 
in summer. 



Oil Meal. 



Farmers are sometimes disappointed in 
the results obtained in feeding oil meal to 
promote the growth of growing animals 
or to increase the flow of milk, as high 
class oil meal will do. The cause is the 
lack of the most important nutriment, 
protein, or else the meal has been adult- 
erated. The Minnesota experiment station 
advises farmers in purchasing oil meal to 
give preference to the coarsest grades, 
rather than those ground so fine as to con- 
ceal the screenings used in adulteration. 
Flax screenings can be more readily de- 
tected in the coarsest grades. The odor 
when mixed with boiling water should be 
noted, and any distinct mustard odor may 
be taken as an indication of poor quality 
A pound of oil cake should absorb at least 
a quart of warm water, adding the water 
a little at a time and stirring well. The 
larger the amount of water absorbed, as a 
rqle, the greater per cent, of protein or 
muscle-producing, milk stimulating nutri- 
ment, and the more valuable the oil meal. 



Alfalfa Should Not Be Pastured. 

On many of the ranches along the Sac- 
ramento river foxtail grass is ruining the 
alfalfa and making it unvaluable as feed 
and pasture. Stock will not eat this grass 
while the alfalfa is continuously cropped 
close to the ground and in course of time 
the foxtail chokes out the alfalfa entirely. 
When this grass is mixed with any other 
feed its beards work their way into the 
stock's eyes and glands and in many in- 
stances injures the stock permanently. 
It often blinds hogs. 

It is generally argued that alfalfa should 
be mowed and fed to stock instead of pas- 
turing it and the conditions above referred 
to prove the correction of this theory.— 
Sutter Fa/rmt r. 

This is what theSun has been preaching 
for years. Where there has been a good 
stand obtained, enough pains should be 
taken to keep the weeds and foxtail out. 
To do this no pasturing should be done, 
especially in the early part of the season 
when the weeds are growing. It is evi- 
dent that if the stock eats the alfalfa and 
leaves the weeds the latter will get the 
advantage of the former. It will pay to 
cut the grass and feed it green if desired. 
It pays to exercise the intellect on any of 
the affairs of life.- Colusa Sim. 



To kill lice on pigs use crude carbolic 
acid and lard, equal parts. Apply on the 
neck, around the ears, back of the fore 
legs, on the back pait of the hams, in the 
flanks and on the back. Coal-oil and lard 
or coal oil and linseed oil equal parts is 
also effective. In addition to the applica- 
tion to the animal the sleeping quarters 
should be thoroughly sprinkled several 
times with coal oil or the crude carbolic 
acid and water. The lice will remain in 
the crevices of the pen and in the dust for 
several weeks. 



The real value of succulent food for 
swine can not be measured by simple 
gains in weights of pigs given such food. 
Undoubtedly where animals are confined 
to a pure grain diet the digestive tract is 
more torpid and sickness is more likely to 
occur than when succulent food is given. 
Then the digestive organs are more active 
and natural in movement and the body is 
better prepared to resist disease than 
when pure grain food is fed. The in- 
fluence of this succulent food on sows in 
pig or sucking pigs cannot be measured 
by the scales but the general testimony of 
practical feeders of experience is that such 
diet promotes easy parturition, a generous 
milk (low and vigorous offspring. 



LOW 

Summer Excursion 
Rates East. 

Southern Pacific 

Offers those low round trip rates: 



ON SALK 



ROUND TRIP 



June 30=July 1. Cincinnati, $76.50 

July 1=2 Detroit, 82.25 
July 3=4 ) 

August 22=23 [ .Buffalo, 87.00 
September 5-6 j 

July 8-9, Colorado Springs, 55.00 

July 17-18 Milwaukee, 74.50 

July 20-21 Chicago, 72.50 

August 20=21 Louisville, 77.50 

September 5=6 Cleveland, 82 50 

Those rates apply from California main-Hue 
points. Many miles shortest— many hours fast- 
est—finest scenery— choice of routes— limited 
trains— personally conducted tourist excursions— 

ACROSS THE CONTINENT 

Details at nearest office 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 




QUINNS OINTMENT 

FOR HORSES 

stands at the head of all veterinary remedies. Such troubles! 
as Spavins, Curbs, WindpufTs, Splints, Bunches have no 
terrors for a horse if the master keeps and applies Quinn's Ointment. All 
well kuown horsemen speak of it in the highest terms : 

Miller A Sibley of Franklin, Pa., owners of St. Bel, brother of Into B*-l Boy, write, bava 
used Qu inn's Ointment with ^reat success and believe it fulfills all claimed for it. We cheer- 
fully recommend it to our friends." For Curbs, Splints, Spavins or Bunches it has no equal. 

Price $1.00 per package. Sold by all druggists, or sent by mail. 
IrV. B. EDDY 4 CO., WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



TRY IT. 



12 



[July 6, 1901 



First Installment of Harness Events 



FOR THE 



1901 CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR 1901 

Sacramento, Sept. 2d to Sept. 14th, inclusive. 

GUARANTEED STAKES - - - ENTRIES TO CLOSE SATURDAY, JULY 27, 

All Races to be contested at the State Fair on days to be hereafter designated by the Board of Directors, and it will be 
the aim of the management to arrange a programme so as to allow horses entered in several events to start in each by 
putting such classes as they are entered in far enough apart to permit of it. 



FOR TROTTERS. 

Horses to be Named with Entry, July 27, 1901. 



No. 1. 2:40 Glass 
No. 2. 2:20 Class 
No. 3. 2:14 Glass 



FOR PACERS- 

Horses to be Named with Entry, July 27, 1901. 

$800 No. 4. 2:25 Class - - - $800 

$800 No. 5. 2:17 Class - - - $800 

$1000 No. 6. 2:13 Class - $1000 



SPECIAL CONDITIONS: Any horse entered in Race No. 1, 2:40 Class Trot, getting a record of 2:25 or better before August 15, 1901, to be reclassified and placed in Race No. 2, 2:20 Class Trot. 
Any horse entered In Race No. 4, 2:25 Class Pace, getting a record of 2:20 or better before August 15, 1901, to be reclassified and placed in Race No. 5, 2:17 Class Pace. 



fox- 

No. 7. 3 Year Olds, Pacers. Entries to be made 
and horses named July 27, 1901. Entrance $10, to accom- 
pany entry; $20 additional from starters; $250 added by 
the State Agricultural Society. 



Colts- 



No. 8. 4 Year Olds, Trotters. Eligible to the 
Green Clasi. Entries to be made and horses named July 27 
1901. Entrance $10, to accompany entry; $20 additionaj 
from starters; $250 added by the State Agricultural Society 



In addition to the above Races the balance of Harness Program to make 24 Races for liberal purses will be announced 
on August lO, 1901. Races will also be given for Roadsters, Trotters and Pacers, belonging to members of the different 

Driving Clubs in California. 

SPECIAL CONDITIONS. 

Make your entries in time and see that they are mailed so that they will not be 
postmarked later than date of closing. 

For other conditions and further particulars see entry blanks, or apply to 



All Races mile beats, best 3 in 5. 

All entries to close with Geo. W. Jackson, Secretary, Sacramento, California, 
Saturday July 27, 1901. 

A. B. SPRECKELS, President. 



GEO. W. JACKSON, Secretary. 



$3500 Guaranteed. Additional Stakes for Trotters and Pacers. $8500 Guaranteed. 

Los Angeles Fair and Race Meeting, 1901. 

DISTRICT AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION No. 6. 

Southern California's Great Racing Event. Thirteen Days-September 28 to October 12, 1901. 

GUARANTEED STAKES FOR TROTTERS AND PACERS. 

ENTRIES TO CLOSE SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1901, WHEN HORSES ARE TO BE NAMED AND ELIGIBLE. 



No. 19. 
No. 20. 
No. 21. 
No. 22. 
No. 23. 
No. 24. 



TROTTING STAKES. 

2:17 Class Trotting 

2:20 Class Trotting 



$700 

$700 

$700 

2:27 Class Trotting $700 

2:29 Class Trotting I $700 

2:35 Class Trotting $700 



2:25 Class Trotting 



PACING STAKES. 

No. 25. 2:11 Class Pacing $800 

No. 26. 2:16 Class Pacing $700 

No. 27. 2:19 Class Pacing $700 

No. 28. 2:21 Class Pacing $700 

No. 29. 2:23 Class Pacing $700 

No. 30. 2:27 Class Pacing $700 



The Conditions of these Races the same as the conditions contained in the ad vertisement of the " Los Angeles Fair and Race Meeting, 1901," in the Breeder 

and Sportsman, June 29, 1901. Send all communications to 



E. T, WRIGHT. President. 



F. G. TEED. Secretary. 226 S. Spring St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Ira Barker Dalziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carriage. Saddle and Road Horses for Sale 

Office and stable: 605 Golden Gate Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. Telephone South 651. 



ZDi% "VT^xxx, "F 1 . Fgan. 

M. R. C. V. S., F. E. V. M. S. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edinburg 
Veterinary Medical Society: Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh: Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department: Live Stock 
Inspector for.Vew Zealand and Austral! an Colonies 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California: Ex-President of 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital. 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco: 
Telephone West 128. 



DR. J. B. BOOMER 

M. D. V, F. M. V. A. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Late Professorof Medicine in McKillip Veterinary 
College at Chicago and assistant to M. N. 
McKillip of Chicago for seven years. 
Office and Infirmary— 510 Van Ness avenue, San 
Francisco Cal. Phone: Mint 321. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



HOL..>TKINS — Winners of every 7 days' butter 
cod lest at State Fair 1899 1st & 2d for aged cows, 
4-yr., 3-yr. and 2-yr.-olds; 21 Jerseys and Durhams 
competing. 5th year my Holsteins have beaten 
Jerseys for butter. Stock for sale; also pigs. F 
H. Burke, 626 Market St., S. F. 

YKKBA BUENA JERSEYS— The best A.J 
C. C. registered prize herd is owned by Henrj 
Prerce, San Francisco. Animals for sale. 

JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND DURHAMS. 

Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1876. William Niles & Co. Los Angeles, 
Cal. 



TEAM FOR SALE 



HANDSOME, STYLISH BLACK TEAM. 
Well matched, perfectly sound, 15V4 hands 
and weigh about 1050 each. Good gaited trotters 
and a high-class road team in every respect. To 
see team and for further particulars address 
E. P. LUCE, 280 S. First St.. San Jose. Cal. 



COCOANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOR 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PIGS 

For sale in lots to salt by 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO. 

208|California Street. San Francisco, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

Handsome Brown Pacing Gelding, 



weight about 1000 pounds, solid color, seven years 
old, kind and gentle; can step a mile in 2:30 any 
day. Can't be beat for general qualifications as a 
gentleman's road horse. Is safe for a lady to 
drive. Address CHAS. CLINE, 2430 N Street, 
Sacramento, Cal. 



BLOODED LIVE STOCK SHIPMENT. 

T PURPOSE TO GO EAST ABOUT AUGUST 
1 1st and return In September. Shall bring back 
Cattle and Sheep, or anything in live stock. Will 
purchase, or freight through. This will be your 
chance for direct shipment with attention. 

Kill I IN PETER SAXE, 

Importer and Exporter of Blooded Live Stock, 
513 Thirty-second St., Oakland. 



July 13, 1901] 



13 



Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association, 

Race Meeting Sacramento, July 30 to August 3, 1901, inclusive 



CLASSES THAT ARE FILLED. 

TUESDAY, JULY 30—2:40 Class Trotting Stakes, $1000. 2:25 Class Pacing Stakes, $1000. 
WEDNESDAY, JULY 31—2:13 Class Pacing Stakes, $1000. 
FRIDAY, AUGUST 2—2:14 Class Trotting Stakes, $1000. 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 3—2:20 Class Trotting Stakes, $1000. 2:17 Class Pacing Stakes, $1000. 



ADDITIONAL GUARANTEED STAKES. 

ENTRIES TO CLOSE MONDAY, JULY 15, 1901. 



No. 7—2:27 Class Trotting $400 

No. S— 2:23 Class Trotting $400 

No. 9—2:17 Class Trotting $500 

No. 10—2:12 Class Trotting $500 

No. 11— Free-for-all Trotting $600 



No. 12 — Three-year-olds Trotting. 

No. 13—2:20 Class Pacing 

No. 14—2:12 Class Pacing 

No. 15 — Free-for-all Pacing 

No. 16 — Three-year-olds Pacing ... 



.$300 
.$400 
$500 
.$600 
$300 



No. 17 — Double Team Race, trotters and pacers, eligible 2:20 Class, mile and repeat $250 

No. 18 — Two-mile Dash, trotters and pacers, eligible to any class $200 

Also races for members of Golden Gate Park Driving Club and races for roadsters, trotters and 
pacers owned in Sacramento County. 

N. B. It is not the intention of the management to give any special races at this meeting and if you want to start your horses they must be entered in the 
regular advertised events. 

For conditions see Entry Blanks. 

E. P. HEALD. President. F. W. KELLEY, Secretary. 

36 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



10 WARREN STREET, NEW YORK. 



The 0, K. celebrated $40 TRACK 
HARNESS beats them all, Known 
over the country tor its Finish, Quality 
, and Durability. Motfatt Leather and i 

L Rawhide lined, in gilt, rubber or silver | 

BSSSZ 

PROF, ROBIQUET'S GREAT DISCOVERY. 



J. O'KANE 

THE LARGEST DEALER IN 

TURF GOODS 

In the United States. 



Manufacturers of 



Try the wonderful 0. K. PASTE for \ 
Cracked Heels, Scratches and Galls | 
of all kinds. Samples FREE. 
HORSE BOOTS! New Patterns! New | 
Prices! New Styles. Write for catalog 1 
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nasi 

SUNDRIES OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS. 



Fine Carriage and Light Harness. 




THE 1901 

Model Racer 
SULKY 



26 and 28 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO. 

S. TOOMEY & CO.'S. 

Record Breaking* 

SULKIES, JOG CARTS, PNEUMATIC ROAD WAGONS, and SPEED 

POLES embody all the Latest Improvements. , 

BALL BEARINGS ARE DUST AND WATERPROOF. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 



O'BRIEN & SONS, Agts., 



Cor. Polk and Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 




I'ri'f :! 



IT 

t-i-i j . 1 jj.jir-< 




GENTS NOBBY CAFT 
No. 2. 

Adapted for Speed 



I 

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Pleasure 
And liuslnesg ® 



11 



[July 13, 1901 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 

Imp. Hackney Stallion 
Green's Kufus 63 < 429l > 

Will serve a limited number of approved marcs seasoD 1901. 

FEE ... $75 
Reductions made for two or more mares. 



Breed to the Champion of the World. 
McKINNEY 2:11 1-4 

By Alcyone, dam Rosa Sprague (grandam of FerenoO) 
2:!OJi) by Gov. Sprague. 



HcKINNhY i-.llii. 

sire of 

Coney 2:02& 

Jennie Mac 2;09 

Hazel Kinney 2:09^ 

Zolock 2:1(H4 

Zombro 2:11 

You Bet 2:12H 

McZeus 2:13 

Dr. Book 2:13J< 

Osito 2:13'/, 

Juliet D 2:131,4 

McBriar 2:14 

Harvey Mac. . .'. 2:HV4 

Geo. W. McKinney . . . .2:14'/ 2 

McNally 2:15 

Monica 2:15 

and 15 more in 2:31) 



By the percentage of his performers in the 2:15 list McKinney is the 
champion sire of the world. At 13 years of age he has 3d stand- 
ard performers, one-half of which are in the 2:15 list. 

A Race Horse Himself. 

He started in 28 races, won 25 of them, was twice second 
and once third. 

He is a Sire of Race Horses. 

Every one of his get in the 2:20 list secured the record 
in a race, and all aro race winners. 

He is a champion in tlie show ring, champion on the race 
track and a champion in the stud. 

In 1900 his get won first, second and fourth money in the Pacific 
Breeders Futurity, first and second money in the Occident Stake 
and first, second and third money in the Stanford Stake. The 
McKinneys are stake winners. Will make the season of 1001 at 

SAN JOSE RACE TRACK. 

Beginning Feb. 1st. until further notice. 



Terms for the Season $100 (With usual return 



Good pasturage for mares at $4 per month. For further particulars, address 

33 Magnolia Avenue, San Jose, Cal. Tel. Green 393. C. A. 



DURFEE 



|%wnrded Gold Mpdal 
At California MM*. 
Fair 1892. 

Every horse owner 
who values his st. ck 

• » nuM constantly have 

• supply oi it on ' and. 
H improves anil keeps 
•i ttu the pink of con- 
.lltmn. 



Manhattan Food Go 



RED BALL BRAND. 

It Positively Cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion 



I : Polaotn St.. San Francisco 
,<Bli your groreis or dealers for it. 



CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR FOR 1901. 
SACRAMENTO 

SEPTEMBER 2nd TO 14th, INCLUSIVE. 

ENTRIES TO CLOSE SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1901. 

All Races to be contested at the State Fair on days to be here 
after designated by the Board of Directors. 



The following; Banning stakes will close August 3, l»OJ, with the Secretary. 
Remainder of Running Program, for which Liberal Panel will be given, will be 
announced September 1st, ami will provide for four or more Running Kat es each day : 

Flash Stflke K,,r Entrance *10, to accompany nomination: In addi- 

■ men *->"*i\v. tional for horses not declared by 4 P. M. the day preceding the race- $400 
added by the Society, of which $70 to second and *.KJ to third. Non-winners of three races this year if 
three year olds and over, live pounds; non-winners of two races, seven pounds; and non-winners of one 
race ten pounds. Maidens, three yearsold allowed Ave pounds; four yearsold and over, seven Bounds 
additional. Six Furlongs. 

The Shafter Selling Stake For Tw " YeHr OI,u - Entrance »io, to accom- 

OIIOIICI OCIllllg OldKC. pany nomination; $15 additional for colts not de- 
clared by 4 p. M. day preceding race; with $3m added by the Society, of which $50 to second and $25 to 
third. Horses may be entered not to be sold, and carry rule weight. If entered to be sold for Iiikki 
allowed three pounds; $700, six pounds; $400, ten pounds. Winnersof one race after closing of slake to 
carr> three pounds extra: n! two or more, seven pounds extra. Maidens bi a ten three times allowed 
rive pounds; four or more, seven pounds. Value to be placed on starters through entry l>ox by 4 p M 
day before race. Six Furlongs. 

Sacramento State Fair Selling Stake. iZZ^tJ^^tSS- 

pany nomination; $20 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. the day preceding the race- $4ijo 

added by the Society, of which $70 to sec 1 and $30 to third. Winner to be sold at auction If for 

$3 ion to carry rule weight; if for less, one pound allowed on each $100 to *|imi, thence two pounds for 
each $100 to $400. Selling price to be placed on starters through entry box by 4 P. H. on the day pre- 
ceding the race. A winner of a stake race or three or more races of any value after closing of stake 
to carry Ave pounds extra. Maidens allowed seven pounds. One Mile. 

The Viflftnr Stake Kor Thr «"' Year Olds and upwards Entrance 8lo. to 
i iiw ▼ iiivtvi uiunv.. accompany nomination: $20 additional for horses not declared by 
4 P. M. day preceding race; with $400 added by the Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third 
Stake to be named after winner if Vinctor's time (1:40) is beaten. \ non-winner of a stake race in 
1901. or a race of the value of $500, allowed, if a non-winner of five races other than selling races five 
pounds. Maidens seven pounds additional. One mile. 



Sunny Slope Stake. 



For Two Year Old Fillies Entrance *10, to aicompanv 
nomination; $15 additional if not declared by 4 p. m. the day pre- 
ceding the race; $.300 added by the Society, of which $5(1 to second and $25 to third. Weights Ave 
pounds below the scale A winner of a stake race in mill, or a winner of three or more races of any 
value, other than selling races, Ave pounds extra. Non-winners of two races allowed four pounds 
Maidens allowed seven pounds, and if such are the produce of a mare that has not produced a winner 
at the time of starting, teu pounds. Maidens beaten three or more times since closing of the stake 
allowed Ave pounds, and if not placed second or third, seven pounds additional. Five furlongs. 

The finvernnr's Stflke A H »" dll: "P for Three Tear Old- and upward... 
WHW 3 olartV -- Entrance 810, to accompany nomination, with $20 addi- 
tional for horses not declared by 4 P. M. day preceding race; with $400 added by the Society, of which 
$70 to second and $30 to third. Weights posted at 12 m. day preceding race. A winner of a race other 
than a selling race, after the weights are published, to carry Ave pounds extra. One mile and a 
furlong. 

The California State Fair Annual Stake. ftJ**SES.*' Su,°. Z"" 

company nomination; $20 additional for horses not declared by 4 P. M. the day preceding the race; 
with $500 added by the Society, of which $100 to second and $50 to third. Weights posted by 12 K. day 
preceding race. A winner of a race, other than a selling race, after the weights are published, to 
carry Ave pounds extra. Six furlongs. 

The President'* Stflke * Handicap for Three Tear IHda and Upward-. 

i iiv. i ■ woiuvui a oiaivk. Entrance mis, to accompany nomination; with $25 addi- 
tional for horses not declared by 4 P. M. day preceding race: $:*») added by the Society, of which tliio 
to second aud $50 to third. Weights posted by 12 M. day before race. A winner of a race other than a 
selling purse, after the weights are published, to carry Ave pounds extra. One and one-quarter miles. 

The State Agricultural Society's rules to govern except where conditions are otherwise. All 
declarations and claims for allowances due at 4 p. M. day preceding race, UDless otherwise speciAed 
in conditions. Owners and trainers will be held responsible for same. Entrance and declaration 
money to go to winner. No added money ftir less than four starters in different interests. In selling 
races, beaten horses not liable to claim. Kight to use starting gate is reserved. 

Entries must state name, color, sex and pedigree of the horse, -with racing colors of the owner. 



GEO. W JACKSON, Secretary California State 
Agricultural Society, Sacramento, Cal. 



A. B. SPKECKELS, President. 



SPOKANE INTERSTATE FAIR. 



$10,000 
IN PURSES. 



SPOKANE, WASH. 



$10,000 
IN PURSES. 



SEPTEMBER 1 0TH TO 21S T INCLUSIVE. 

The ROYAL ITALIAN BAND, one of the Greatest Musical Organizations in the country, has been 

secured at a cost of $5500. 



Entries to Harness Events close July 25, 1 90! . 



Entries to Running Races close on Night Before Race at 6 o'clock, 



SEPTEMBER 10— TUESDAY. 
Stock Parade. 1:30 P. M. sharp. 



No. I— Two-year-old Pacing »300 

No. 3—3:33 Cla-s Pacing 

3 — Running. Half-mile dash. Handicap 150 

4 — Running. One mile dash. Selling. »600. 
Weight for age. Five pounds off for each 
SlOOduwntu S2O0 250 

S 1 : PT E HBEB 11 — W EI> NESD iY. 

5— 3:30 Class Pacing VI oo 

6— 3:30 Class Trotting 400 

7 — Running. Five-eights mile dash. Handicap. 
Two yearsold ISO 

8 — Hurdle Race. One and one-fourth miles. 
Four hurdles. Handicap 100 

8EPIKMBER 1 2— THURSDAY. 

9— 3:30 Class Trotting SIOOO 

10— 3:50 Class Pacing 350 

No. 1 1=-Runnlng. Hair mile and repeat Selling, 

SIOO. Weight for age. Five pounds off 

for each »100 down to »100 300, 

No. 13 — Running. One mile dash. Handicap 350 



No. 
No. 



No 
No. 
No. 

No. 



No 
No 



Entrance Fee, 5% of purse and 5% additional from money winners. 

Entrance to Harness Races payable at time of entry. Two horses may be entered from the same 
stable in the same class and held but for one entry; horse to be named the day before the race. Money 
to be divided as follows in harness races: 50%, 25%, 15% and 10%. Mile heats 3 in 5, except Nos. 1, 13, 
14 and 25, which are 2 in 3. Money in running races to be divided: 70%, 20% and 10%. 

Hopples are not barred. The Board reserves the right to declare off and return entrance fee in 



SEFTEMBEK 13-FEIDAY. 

No. 13— Two-year-old Trot S40P 

No. 14— Three-year-old and under, Trutting 300 

No. 15— Bunning. Seven-eighths mile dash. Sell- 
ing, 8400. Weight for age. Five pounds 

off for each SI 00 down to $100 200 

No. 16— Running. Three-eighths mile dash. Han- 
dicap ' 160 

SEPTEMBER 14— SATUBDAY. 

No. 17—2:17 Class Trotting 8600 

No. 1 8— Gentlemen's Driving Bace to wagon. 

Owners to drive. Trotters eligible to 3:35 

class. First prize Cup 

Second prize Lap robe 

Third Prize Whip 

No. 19— Bunning. Spokane Derby. One and one- 
half miles for three-year-olds 500 

No. 30 — Running. Half mile ami repeat. Handicap. 20(1 

SEPTEMBER 16— MONDAY. 
No. 21— Gentlemen's Driving Bace to wagon. 

Owners to drive. Pacers eligible to 2:30 

class. First prize Cup 

Second prize Lap robe 

Third prize Whip 

CONDITIONS. 



No. 22— Free for all. Slow race. Mile dash 850 

No. 33— Newsboys' Bace. Half mile dash 35 

SEPTEMBKR 17— TUESDAY. 

No. 24—3:35 Class Trot 8300 

No. 25— Three-year-old Pacing 350 

No. 36— Special Indian Baee 100 

SEPTEMBER 18— WEDXESDAY. 

37 — Free-Tor-all Trotting 8500 

38— 3 :34 Cla-s Trot 400 

39— Bunning. Half mile dash. Washington 
and Idaho horses, owned in these States 
January 1 , 1 90 1 

30— Running. Quarter mile dash. Weight 
for age 



No. 
No. 
No. 



175 



SEPTEMBER 19-THUKSDAY. 



No 

No. 
No, 



2:15 Class Pace SIOOO 

2BO 



31 

32— 2:50 Class Trot 

33— Running. Three-fourths mile dash. Han- 
dicap 7. 

34 — Bunning. Half mile dash. Horses owued 
in Spokane County, Jan. 1, 1901 



200 



any purse that does not fill satisfactorily. A horse distancing the field is entitled to first and fourth 
monies only, and in no other case will a horse be entitled to more than one money. The usual weather 
clase will be observed. 

Other than specified, the rules of the National Trotting Association will govern. The rules of 
the California Jocltev Club will govern the running races. 



For Entry Blanks, address H. BOLSTER, Secretary, Spokane, Wash. 



Or BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, San Francisco, Cal. 



July 13, 1901] 



15 



Race Record 
2:16 1-2. 



NUTWOOD WILKES 222I6 

The Champion Sire of Early and Extreme Speed. 

He is the only stallion whoever produced two three-year-olds in one season with 
records of 3:12 and 2:T<f>4 respectively. Who I- It is the champion three-year- 
old gelding of the world, and last year reduced his record to 2:10^. John A. McKer- 
ron 2:10 holds the champion stallion record to wagon in a race. 

NUTWOOD WILKES will make the season of 1901 at the 

NUTWOOD STOCK FARM, from Feb. 15th to July 1st. 

Fee = $50 NUTWOOD WILKES 2216, Race Rec. 2:16 1-2 



By Guy Wilkes 2:15^, I KENNEL ADVERTISEMENTS 

Dam Lida W. 2:18} by Nutwood 2:18| 



For the Sanson 



With return privileges 
if horse remains my 
property. Good pastur- 
age at $3 per month. 
Bills payable before re- 
moval of mare. Stock 
well cared for. but no re- 
sponsibility assumed for 
accidents and escapes. 



is the sire of 



John A. McKerron 2:10 

Ch. Stallion Race Rec 
Matinee rec(wagon) .2:09 
3-year-old race rec...2:12>f 

Who Is It 2:10^ 

3-year-old race rec. .2:12 

Georgie B 2:12fcf 

Claudius 2:13!<f 

Bob Ingersoll 2:14% 

Irvington Boy 2:17% 

Young stock by Nutwood Wilkes for sale. 

For further particulars apply or address 

MARTIN CARTER, 

Nutwood Stock Farm, Irvington, Alameda Co., 



Irvington Belle 2: 

Echora Wilkes 2: 

Central Girl 2: 

Wilkes Direct 2: 

Alix B 2: 

Who Is She 2: 

Fred Wilkes 2: 

Queen C 2: 

Electress 2: 

Daugestar 2: 




hill Cocker Kennels 

Red, always on hand. San Anselmo, Cal. 

POINTER 



FOR SALE. 



A bitch, two years old, well broken and good dis- 
position. Fine looker, lemon and white. 
For particulars address OWNER, 

Care of Bkebdek and Sportsman. 



AT STUD 



The Latest 
and Best 



McMURRAY 





Great Sacrifice Sale 



•OF- 



NEW STYLES FOR 1901. 

Highest perfection in mechanical skill and design, and the best part — Our Prices Are Right. 

PNEUMATIC SULKIES -TWO STYLES. 

The only sulky made that can be lined up on the race track without the aid of a bikeman. The 
only tool required being a monkeywreneh 

The onlv Jog Cart that will giyo you a straight pull on your horse when speeding. No better 
made. 

Gentlemen's Pneumatic Runabouts for fancy driving, also with solid rubber tires, and Pneumatic 
Speed Wagons. 

Send for Catalogues. 

KENNEY BICYLCE CO., 



531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Pacific Coast Agts. 



V>t*AtCM*f>C TahflfllflfoH and type written ready for framing 
rCUI^I CC3 1 aUUiaiCU Write for prices. Breeder and 
Sportsman, 36 Geary street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Ladies' Suits, 

Cloaks, Jackets, 

Capes and Waists 

Everything at Cut Rates. 

J, O'BRIEN & CO. 

1144 Market Street. 



We Build 
SULKY WHEELS 



CUBA OF KENWOOD 

(yienheif h Jr. l.aj 

SAM'S BOW 

(Plain aam— Dilly Uee II) 

STOCKDALE KENNELS 

K. IYI . IIODGK, Mmiagfr, 
RHkcr-flcld, Khhi • .. . 

Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken 
Dogs for sale. 

■rX*± BOOK ON 

Dog Diseases 

AND 

Ho "*7*7- t o IT* eed 

Mailed Free to any address by the t.nhoi 
K Clay Glover. D V. H„ 1293 Broadway 

New York 

GORDON SETTER PUPPIES 

FOR SALE. Thoroughbreds by a son of Dick III, 
winner at four bench shows in this city— out of 
Mirza, winner at May -how, ]KKi. 
Address Owner 1050 Grove St. Oakland, Cal. 



Of All Kinds. 



(Roller Ball and Pin Bearings) 

AND 

CONVERT HIGH WHEEL SULKIES and 
CARTS to PNEUMATIC WHEELS. 



CURED BY 

Absorbine, Jr. 




A patient writes : He 
was thrown from his bi- 
cycle, wrenching his 
knee. Within a few hours the pain was 
so bad he could not use the limb. He ap- 
plied ABSORBINE, JR. The next day 
he rode 42 miles without a sign of soreness. 

This unequalled Liniment costs only 
$1.00 per bottle by mail. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 

SPRINGFIELD , - • MASS. 

For sale by Mack £Co.. Langley & Michaels Co., 
Redington & Co , J. O'Kane, and J. A. McKerron, 
all of San Francisco. 



CALIFORNIA 

Photo Engraving Company 

HIGH CLASS ART 
IN 

Half Tows and Line Eix/niriitf/s. 
Artistic Designing. 
513 Market Street, San Francisco. 



Palace Hotel 



In placing- these two hotels 
under one management and 
joining them with a covered 
passageway, the purpose was 
to provide guests with com- 
forts and conveniences not 
obtainable in any other hotel 
in the West. And the plan 
is a success. 

AMERICAN PLAN EUROPEAN PLAN 



Grand Hotel 



All Work First Class and Prices Right. 

KENNEY BICYCLE CO., 
531 Valencia St., San Francisco. 

Calm Norliw estern Br. 

LESSEE OF 

San Francisco & North Pacific Ry 
The Picturesque Route 

OF CALIFORNIA. 

The Finest Hunting and Fishing In California . 

NUMEROUS RESORTS. 

1 Mineral Springs, Hot and Cold, 

HEALTH 

PLEASURE 

RECREATION 

The Section for Fruit Farms and Stock 
Breeding. 

THE ROUTE TO 

San Rafael, Petaluma 
, Santa Rosa, Ukiah 

And other beautiful towns. 
I THE PEST CAMPING GROUNDS ON 
THE CO AST. 

Ticket Office — Corner New Montgomery and 
Market streets, under Palace Hotel. 
General, Office— Mutual Life Building. 

R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 

DUNLAP HOTEL 





Richelieu (afe 



Junction & J5 tARNV I 



CALORIC VITA OIL 



Cures lameness and .soreness In man and beast 
Ask any horse trainer;about it. At all druggists 




H. H DUNLAP 

(Prop.) 

CONDUCTED on 

American 

Plan 



Rates: 
»3 to *4 per Day 



340 O'Farrell St., 
San Francisco. 



yLtftNTE!) fcOGSWITN MANGE 

EPX',10 f UCT TMf 1 HUM ST ANDARDOtl OF TAH 

Si MND rnf* CInctUR •> TESTIMONIALS A-irMRff 5ANPLI 

,nr > DISINFECTANT CO Cleveland O 



The Br ; eder and sportsman is 
Agent for the following publications on 
THE DOG: 



KENNEL SECRETS, 
Ashmont. 



The most exhaustive 
treatise on The Dog 

by Ashmont, ' t^nTXt 

tious contained in this 
Price, postpaid, $3.00. volume, even a novice 
can manage a kennel, 
breed and exhibit Dogs as scientifically as a vet- 
eran at the business. It contains .'{48 pages, is 
beautifully bound in cloth, and has 150 exquis- 
ite half-tones of the most celebrated Dogs of the 
various breeds of the present day. 

Anyone securing FIVE new yearly subscrip- 
t ions' to the BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 
(*3 each) and forwarding the cash to this 
office will at once be sent this valuable book as a 
premium. 



DISEASES OF DOGS, 
by Ashmont. 

Price, postpaid, *2.00. 



This standard work 
is invaluable to 
every owner of a 
good Dog. It gives 
you a knowledge of 
what disease your 
faithful canine 
friend is affected with and how to quickly cure 
tke same. There are 213 pages in this volume. 

Anvone securing THREE now yearly sub- 
scriptions to the HREEDER AND SPORTS- 
MAN (S3 each) and forwarding the cash to 
this office will at once be sent this more than 
useful work as a premium. 



FETCH AND CARRY, by Waters. 

Price, postpaid, $1.50. 

With the aid of this book anyone with ordinary 
intelligence can easily teach a Dog to retrieve in 
fine style. Every duck hunter should own a copy 
of this. The work contains 124 pages and is 
bound in cloth. 

Anyone securing THREE new yearly sub- 
scriptions to the BREEDER AND SPORTS- 
MAN (83 each) ami forwarding the cash to 
this office will at once besentonoof these vol- 
umes as a premium. 



MODERN TRAINING 
AND HANDLING,, 



by Waters. 



Price, postpaid, $3.00. 

This is universally conceded to bo far and aw&y 
the best work on the subject over published iu 
any country. l)o :' fanciers everywhere recommend 
it Anyone securing THREE) new yearly sub- 
scriptions to the BREEDER AND SPORTS- 
MAN (S8 each) and forwarding the cash to 
this office will at once 1)0 sent tills really great 
work on training and handling dogs as a pre- 
mium. It contains 333 pages and is neatly 
bound in doth. 



PRINCIPLES OF 
DOG TRAINING, 



by Ashmont, 



Price, postpaid, 80 cents. 

The above-mentioned work is by one of the most 
thoroughly posted writers on the Dog in the world 
and Is worth its weight in gold for the field, etc. 

11 contains 01 pages and is I id In cloth. 

Anyone securing TWO new yearly subscrip- 
tions to the BREEDER AND SPORT 8M IN 
(88 each) and forwarding the cash to this 
office will be at onco sent this clover work as a 
premium. 



Mark Levy & Co. 



16 



[July 13, 1901 



TELEPHONE-. 

South 640 




ORSE BOOTS 



203 20< 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Du Pont Gun Powder 

SMOKELESS 

SHOT GUN and 

MILITARY POWDER 

Black Powder for Sporting and Blasting Purposes 

The Reputation of a Hundred Years is the Guarantee of 



DU PONT POWDER 



O. A. HAIGHT, Ag- 



ttd market Street, San Fran«-<"<-<> 



REMINGTON SINClE um 



SHOT GUN, 



SIX 

GAUGES 




AT P RIVATE SALE! 

The Famous Estate known as 

CASTLETON 

The Banner Farm of the Blue Grass Country, 

SITUATED FOUR AND ONE-HALF MILES NORTH OF LEXINGTON. KY., IN THE 
u neighborhood of WALNUT HALL, home of L. V. Harkness, Esq. (Standard Oil Co.), of New York, 
and ELMENDORF, home of J. B. Haggin, Esq. (the Copper King), of California. 

THIS FARM contains 617 acres, all in grass; grand, original 
woodland, magnificent avenue, large dwelling, and 
all first-class improvements. 

Now leased by Mr. James R. Keene, banker, of New York City. 
The owners of this property do not reside in Kentucky, and desire to sell for division of Interest 

EDGAR ALLAN. Attorney-at-Law, Norfolk, Va. 



Apply to 



10-12-16-20-24-28. 

Top Lever, Blue Steel Barrel, Rebounding Lock 
Side Cocking Lever, Case-hardened Frame, Rubber 
Butt-Plate, Pistol Grip Stock, Choke Bored. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 

REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY. 



Factory: Ilion, N. Y. 



Pacific Coast Depot: 



25-437 MARKET ST., 
BAK FRANCISCO, CAL 



Clabrough, Goloher & Go, 



GUNS 
Gun Goods 



«-8end for Catalogue. 




FISHING 
Tackle 



538 MARKET STREET, S. F. 



SMITH GUNS 

At the Cal. Inanimate Target Association 
May 25-26, 1901. 

71 Shooters, 20 used Smith Guns. 

There were 11 Individual Trophies offered. 
Shooters using SMITH GUNS captured 9. 
Coast Record made by Edward Schultz, 112 Straight. 

Edgar Forster, high average, 95%. Ed. Schultz and Otto Feudner, 92%. 
Webb, 90%. E. Feudner, 89J%. Varien, 88%. F. Feudner, 87i%. 
Flickinger; 87%. Shields and McCutchan, 86i%, Williamson, 86%. 

They all shot L. C. S mith Guns. 

Catalogue on application to 

HUNTER ARMS CO., Fulton, N. Y. 

PHIL,. B. HKKKAKT CO., San Francisco, Coast Representative. 

You can get these Smokeless Powders in 



IT'S THE MAN BEHIND THE GUN, BUT WITH 

BALLISTITE 

THE SHOOTER ALWAYS HAS THE 




As it Is ABSOLUTELY SMOKELESS, 
NO RESIDUE OR ODOR WHEN FIRED, 
PRESSURES LOWER THAN BLACK POWDER. 
PATTERNS EVEN AND CLOSE AT ALL RANGES. 
VELOCITIES THE HIGHEST, WITH NO STRINGING OF SHOT. 
Unaffected by climatic changes or age Fouling very slight ; does not 

increase, however many shots are fired. 
Try It yourself. Don't take anybody's word. Cartridges loaded with BALLISTITE can be obtained 
from the leading Cartridge Companies, Gun and Ammunition Dealers, or the Sole Agents. 



J. H. LAU & CO. 



75 Chambers St,, New York 

A postal brings " Shooting Facts.' 



Importers and Dealers In Fire Arms, Ammunition and Fencing Goods. 



COAST RECORD. 

Made with SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 

EDWARD SCHULTZ 

112 Straight Targets. 

Ingleside, May 36, 1901. 



WORLD RECORD. 

Made with E. C. No. 1 
w. R. CROSBY 

345 Straight Targets. 

New York, April, 1901. 



Manufactured by THE AMERICAN "E. C." and "SCHULTZE" Gunpowder Co., Ltd 

PHIL. B BEKEART CO.. Paclflo Co»st Represent*!!. 



FACTORY . . 
LOADED 



SHELLS 



DU PONT 
' E. C." 
SCHULTZE 
HAZARD 



SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 
BALLISTITE 
LAFLIN & RAND 



What More do you Want? 



PRIVILEGES! 

FOR SALE. 



Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders 
Association. Race Meeting 

AT SACRAMENTO 

July 30 to Aug. 3, 1901, inclusive. 

Bids for the following privileges will be received 
up to noon, July 15, 1901: 

Betting Privilege (Book and Auction Pools) 

FRUIT, CANDY and NUTS, 

PROGRAMMES. 

A certified cheok for fifty per cent should accom- 
pany each bid. Right reserved to reject any or all 
bids. Address F. W. KELLEY, Soc'y. 

36 Geary St., San Francisco. 



Stallion Service Books 



ONE DOLLAR IN CASH 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
mercial school on the Pacific Coast. 18,000 gradu- 
ates: 25 teachers: 80 typewriters; over 300 students 
annually placed in positions. Send for catalogue. 

E. P. HEALD, Prwsldnit. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 



■ liKALKK- IN - 



At This Office. 



55-67-59-61 First Street, 8. F. 



TaUPHOlTK MAIN 199 




WALDO .J 2:08. DKIVKN BY J. C. QUINN. 
(From a Photo by King Bros., Honolulu.) 
Tbe gray son of A. W. Richmond is now the ohamplon pacer of the Hawaiian Islands. 



2 



[July 20, 1901 



if JOTTINGS. || 



fKentucy Prince. 



Elden (3) 2:19'/i. 



Nephew.. 



Eleanor . 



f Hambrino 2:21 X 
I Trotting Sister 
C Electioneer 



( Sally Gardner 

Dexter Prince, her sire, is one of the greatest speed 
producers that ever came to California, although many 
of his get are accused of being "rattle headed, "and 
there is no doubt but there have been many bad actors 
among them. He had at the close of 1900 thirty-eight 
trotters and thirteen pacers in the standard list, and 
four of his sons and four of his daughters had pro- 
duced standard speed. Of Dexter Prince's list of per- 
formers nine have records better than 2:15. He is a 
beautifully bred horse, his sire, Kentucky Prince, being 
the best of the sons of Clark Chief 89, one of the stout- 
est of the sons of Mambrino Chief. The dam of Dexter 
Prince, Lady Dexter, was a full sister to the famous 
Dexter 2:17 J , the champion of his day, and also of Dic- 
tator, the founder of the great Dictator family which 
contains the names of such champions as Director 2:17, 
Direct 2:05$, Directum 2:05}, Directly 2:03}, Bonnie 
Direct 2:05}, Jay Eye See 2:06}, Nancy Hanks 2:04, 
Egozen 2:06} and many others whose names I cannot 
recall at this writing. 

So much for the sire of the M. & M. winner of 1901. 
On her dam's side the blood is fully as rich. Her dam 
was Elden, that took a trotting record of 2:19$ as a 
three year old. Elden was by Nephew, a horse that 
produced speed and stamina. The fastest of his get 
were Laurel 2:13 J and Beaury Mac 2:14 J, both as game 
trotters as ever looked through a bridle. Nephew was 
by Hambrino 2:21}, a son of Edward Everett, he by 
Hambletonian 10. The second dam of Eleata was 
Eleanor, a mare that was bred on the "Stanford 
theory," being by the greatest of all trotting sires, • 
Electioneer, out of Sally Gardner, a thoroughbred 
mare by Vandal, next dam|by imported Mickey Free, 
and so on through nine or ten more thoroughbred 
mares recorded in the American Stud Book to im- 
ported Selima by the celebrated Godolphin Arabian 
Eleata's blood lines are certainly rich and royal. 



The mile trotted by the great chestnut gelding, 
Boralma, in the second heat of the 2:08 class at Detroit 
last Tuesday, when he made the circuit of the track in 
2:07}, reducing his record three-fourths of a second, 
shows that he is an improved horse over his last year's 
form, and will arouse in the mind of every horseman 
in America a desire to be present at Lexington, in 
October, when this son of Boreal will meet The Abbot 
and 'Cresceus in a race for the championship. With 
these three trotting wonders in condition it will be a 
race worth crossing continents and oceans to see, and 
although The Abbot and Cresceus have respectively 4 
and 3} seconds the best of Boralma as far as speed 
shewn up to date is considered, there are many horse- 
men who will pin their faith to Mr. Lawson's horse in 
this race. Boralma has done everything up to date 
that has been asked of him. He was unbeaten as a 
three year old and took a record at that age of 2:13. 



They could not beat him the next year and he equalled 
the world's record of 2:08 for four year old trotters 
held by John Nolan. He is Ave years eld now and un- 
doubtedly a better horse than ever. His pedigree to 
the third generation is as follows: 



THE WINNER of the Merchants and Manufacturers 
■ stake this week at Detroit was bred at Palo Alto 
stock farm and sold as a two year old in 1899 at Cleve- 
land for $900. The statement that Superintendent F. 
W. Covey made at the time she was put up was that 
he considered her "one of the best in the sale, that she 
was not only an exceptionally fine looking filly but 
gaited right to go fast," and she has more than ful- 
filled this brief description. In the catalogue of the 
sale her name was given as Elata, but we notice that 
it is spelled Eleata in the entry lists and the reports of 
the races in which she has started. By her heat in 
2:08} Eleata becomes the third 2:10 performer for Mr. 
A. B. Spreckels' stallion Dexter Prince. The fact 
that Eleata is owned by Senator Jones of the Maple, 
wood Farm, New Hampshire, and was driven in this 
race by Tom Marsh, who drove the memorable race 
two years ago with Kingmond in the M. & M., in which 
he lost first money by trying for every heat, is a source 
of gratification to those who admire the pluck and 
honesty of both owner and driver. Eleata had started 
in but one race prior to her start at Detroit. It was 
at Dover, New Hampshire, on the 10th of this month 
where she met several high class horses in the 2:23 
class for a purse of $500, and won in three straight 
heats in 2:16}, 2:13} and 2:14. Eleata races in quarter 
boots forward, scalpers and shin boots behind, and is 
very clean and rapid in her gait. A tabulation of her 
pedigree for three crosses is as follows: 

(Clark Chief 
(.Kentucky Queen 

Dexter Prince 1 

} (Hambletonian 1U 

I.Lady Dexter •< 

(Clara 



Boreal 2: 15?^. 



Earalma 



I Bow Bells 2A9H 



Rosie Morn. 



Earl 2:23^. 



Amal . 



| Electioneer 
(.Beautiful Bells 



(Alcantara 
(Noontide 
( Prinoeps 
( Juno 
jClay 2:25 

( Alameda Maid 2:27(4 
There is considerable California blood in that pedi- 
gree, and the greatest broodmares in the world are 
represented. There are two crosses of Electioneer 
(through Bow Bells and Clay) and if carried out the 
podigree would show the names of Green Mountain 
Maid, Beautiful Bells and Alma Mater, the greatest 
broodmares in the books. Alameda Maid 2:271, the 
third dam, was bred by John Livingston of this city 
and sold by him to Senator Stanford. She was by 
Whipple's Hambletonian out of a mare called Mary 
Taylor that was by Biggart's Rattler out of the Taylor 
mare of unknown breeding. Like Eleata, the winner 
of the M. & M. Boralma has many crosses of the great 
Hambletonian 10. 

Ever since the Brooders Association, in deference to 
the wishes of the district fair associations, abandoned 
the plan of giving its annual meeting in the fall and 
took the first week of the circuit, its entry list has 
naturally not been as large as it was previous to the 
change. In spite of the weather conditions prevailing 
in California, which permit training all the year round, 
many horses are raced each year that are not ready to 
start before the State Fair. I believe the Breeders 
would make their entry list much larger, keep at home 
many of the good green ones that now go East, and 
induce the training of many more horses here, if they 
would give a good sized early closing stake for trotters 
of the 2:25 class and one for pacers of the same class. 
These stakes should not be less than $2000 each, should 
close not later than February, with entrance due in 
several easy payments. Get a couple of such stakes 
established and it would not belong until buyers would 
be scouring the State looking for horses that had a 
chance to win them and an interest in the races would 
be aroused that would draw larger crowds to the meet- 
ing where they were decided than any other attraction 
would. I heard a follower of the Grand Circuit say 
last winter that the M. &. M. and the Chamber of 
Commerce brought over ten thousand dollars in gate 
money to the Detroit meeting that it would not other- 
wise get. I suggest to the P. C. T. H. B. A. that it 
think this matter over between now and the first of 
January next. 

Hats for Horses. 



for years have used burdock leaves for this purpose 
and with good effect. Four or five burdock leaves are 
dipped into a spring of water, then two holes are made 
for the ears and the leaves without any additional 
trimmings are placed on the horses' heads, shading 
the eyes from the glare the sunV rays and the.i»et ■ 
leaves keeping the head cool and comfortable.— How 
wortfL 

Horse Notes From the Blue Grass. 



It is not uncommon to hear the Pan-American visit- 
ors to Buffalo dilate upon the beauty and progressive- 
ness of Buffalo, but perhaps the thing which attracts 
more attention and genuine curiosity than any other 
is the now headgear of horses. Like the up-to-date 
woman, the horses have adopted the shirt-waist hat 
and appear equally as chic and as comfortable as does 
the woman with the same sensible headgear. The 
horses that are so fortunate as to possess such hats 
wear them with dignity and consciousness that is ex- 
tremely amusing, their large, sympathetic eyes ex- 
pressing more plainly than words the gratitude they 
feel to their humane masters. 

The hats are made of a perforated straw with two 
holes through which the ears extend. The crown is 
conical in shape and the brim is wide enough to shade 
the eyes. The only trimming is a binding of turkey 
red on the brim and the earholes. The hat is held 
fast to the head with bonnet strings — a slight extrava- 
gance over the woman's shirt-waist hat — which are 
tied under the animal's chin. In the crown is placed 
a wet sponge that keeps the brain cool, and together 
with the perforations in the straw, prevents the pres- 
ence of any dead air, or a hot, perspiring skin, which 
would be caused by keeping in the animal heat. 

The innovation of hats for ho.-ses during the sultry 
season is an important step on the part of the Society 
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. This society 
has done much, not only in the interests of horses, but 
of other animals. The supply of hats has been ex- 
hausted and although the organization is receiving 
orders for large numbers every day, it has been unable 
to fill any orders for several days and does not expect 
to be able to do so for three or four days more. Sev- 
eral dealers in horse supplies have also heen handling 
the new headgear, but they, too, are now waiting for 
the manufacturers to fill orders. The hats are very 
inexpensive, costing 35 cents 

The hat idea, however, is notentirely new. Farmers 



[Kentucky Stock Farm.] 

C. W. Williams shipped five carloads of horses from 
Lexington to Galesburg, 111., last Wednesday. The 
lot included the five stallions, Allerton 2:09}, Expedi- 
tion 2:15^, Infact 2:26}, St. Vincent 2:13$ and Belsire 
2:21}. In all about eighty head were shipped. 
Williams will stand his great stallions near Lexington 
again next year, but after that he may make other 
arrangements. His five stallions have done a splendid 
business in the Blue Grass this year, and doubtless will 
do as well next season, as there has been a very gen- 
eral revival of the breeding industry throughout the 
country. 

George A. Bain, Lexington's great horse auctioneer 
and a gentleman well known and popular with every 
trotting horse lover in America, has, in company with 
Virgil McClure, the Secretary of the Transylrania 
Printing Company, purchased of J. D. Armstrong ttte 
Elite Printing and Stationery establishment on Mayi- 
street, in Lexington, and will take possession of the* 
business about July 15th. The purchase will not inter- 
fere with Mr. Bain's business as an auctioneer, but he 
will always be found at the Elite when not engaged at 



Speaking of a handsome stallion, there are few bet- 
ter looking horses anywhere than Moko, and if the 
proverb, "pretty is as pretty does," be applied to him 
he is handsome to an impressive degree. He is beauti- 
fully bred, is fashioned on model lines, and is the sire 
of the double Futurity winner, Fereno (3) 2:10}, and of 
Mobel (3) 2:16}. Moko is a grand individual, and no 
visitor to his stall has ever been heard to say that he 
was lacking in any of the particulars that go to make 
up beauty in a horse. 

A Lexington turfman, just back from a visit to the 
Oakley track, says Benson's stable will be shipped to 
Glens Falls, N. Y., this week. The string is made up 
of ten horses, headed by The Roman 2:18}. He says 
the son of McKinney recently stepped a mile around 
2:15, which is good evidence that he has his speed. 
Silver Wilkes 2:10}, Sybil S. 2:16}, Estrella2:24i, Phoebe 
Childers 2:10}, Tom Tipton 2:15$, Walter K." 2:08, a 
green gelding by Silverthorne, a four year old mare 
by Wilton and the black gelding they call Sable Kid 
are in this string. Budd Doble goes with the stable to 
Glens Falls. 

Charles Marvin will ship a string of seven horses to 
Cleveland next week. The stable includes Captor by 
Electric Bell, dam Eula Lee by General George H. 
Thomas; Furl (3), brown filly by Belsire, dam Miss 
Royster by Red Wilkes; Grace Elred (2), bay filly by 
Cecilian, dam Elred by Red Wilkes; Aylwin (3), bay 
colt by Electrite, dam Silver Bell by Simmons; Major, 
bay gelding by Dr. Hooker, dam by Red Wilkes; 
Chase and one or two others. Captor has been a mile 
in about 2:14, and is in fine condition. The others of 
the string are looking well and need only the finishing 
touches to fit them for racing. Marvin is a veteran 
reinsman, an ornament to the profession, and probably 
the greatest colt trainer in the world. His horses have 
been doing well for him this season, and the best 
wishes of everybody will accompany him through the 
circuit. The gelding Major is in fine condition and 
has shown a great deal of speed in his work. Grace 
Eldred is entered in the Futurity for two year olds, 
and is stepping satisfactorily. 

Organizi ng Drivin g Clubs. 

San JOSE, July 16. — Dr. D. E. Nash, Al Hanks, 
Chief of Police Kidward, Lou Sonniksen, George Y. 
Bollinger, Joe McKiernan, R. Messing, C. M. Barker 
"Tootsy" Hartman and others are agitating the ques- 
tion of organizing a gentlemen's driving club. Dr. 
Nash, by the way, has recently purchased a new road- 
ster which ho expects to drive beside his Red Wilkes 
trotter. 

Whittier, July 15. — A gentlemen's club, under the 
name of the Whittier and Rivera Driving Club, has 
been organized here, holding its first meeting Satur- 
day, at the old Pico houso, when the following officers 
were elected: A. H. Dunlap, Jr., President: E. C. Coff- 
man, Vice-President; H. H. Judson, Secretary; William 
Moss, Jr., Treasurer; J. H. Taylor, Marshal. At pres- 
ent the club numbers twenty-five members, all of them 
owners of good horses, who have felt the need of some 
place other than the public roads to speed their ani- 
mals, and as a result they have leased a strip of land 
of Charles Prager and will put it in shape for a private 
speedway. The plan is for a road eighty feet wide, 
and nearly a mile long, with about two acres at the 
finish for spectators, and the road will be ready for 
the use of members by August 1st. The club is a 
purely amateur affair, no racing for money or betting 
being allowed and all expenses of the club are to be 
met by the monthly dues of the members. The follow- 
ing gentlemen compose the club at the present time, 
A. H. Dunlap, Jr.; Dr. T. B. Moorhead, W. W. 
Flanders, E. C. Coffman, J. W. Galbraith, Jr.; W. T. 
Dunlap, E. W. Johnson, W. H. Davis, Watt Tyler, 
William Moss, Jr.; J. T. Kirk wood, J. Alex Cate, F. 
A. Coffman, H. H. Judson, D. S. Reynolds, J. H. Tay- 
lor, W. A. Lont, Charles King, Os Burke, G. H. 
Murphy, W. H. Taylor, Guy Tyler, Ira Isbell. 



July 20, 1901] 



California Horses at Davenport. 

A very successful harness meeting was held during 
the week of July 8th, at Davenport, Iowa, at which 
some of the California horses which left here a few 
months ago were started. On the second day of the 
meeting C. E. Clark won the 2:40 class trot in straight 
heats with Sue, and the general comment of the horse- 
men who "saw her race was that she could have beaten 
2:10 in the race if necessary. Sue had won her race at 
Pekin the week previous in straight heats, all of them 
in 2:14 and a fraction and was therefore made favorite. 
There were seven other starters, and some good ones 
among them, but Sue outclassed them all. The purse 
was $800. The Sime of the three heats was 2:13}, 2:12J 
and 2:14}. These are the fastest miles by a green 
trotter this year up to the date of this race. Sue was 
raced in California in 1899 by Mr. Clark, but did not 
win a heat. Her best race was her first, when she 
stayed through five heats of the race won by Sybil S. 
2:16}. After that she was usually distanced or drawn 
after a heat or two had been trotted. She had great 
speed but was unsteady and it was predicted that a 
fast record would be within her reach whenever she 
steadied down. Sue is by Athadon 2:27 (son of Mata- 
don 9392 and Athalie, dam of Athanio 2:10, Athavis 
2:18}, Athadon 2:27 and Athalbo 2:29}) out of Gypsy 
by Scallion's Hambletonian. 

On the third day of the Davenport meeting, Car- 
melita by Cornelius won the 2:13 pace in three straight 
heats after dropping the first to Kassell, a bay son of 
Dunton Wilkes. Det Bigelow's mare Tags got third 
money out of this race, her positions in the summary 
being 4-4-2-5. You Bet 2:12J by McKinney also started, 
but failed to get inside the money. The time of the 
four heats was 2:13}, 2:10}, 2:12, 2:13|. 

Every race on Thursday, the fourth day at Daven- 
port, was won in straight heats. The gray mare, Fre- 
quent by Florida, won the 2:20 trot, reducing her rec- 
ord to 2:15} in the first heat and trotting the other two 
but a quarter of a second slower. The 2:25 pace was 
won by Major Mason, a bay gelding by Onward. He 
turned the track the second heat in 2:13| very handily 
None of the California horses started in either of these 
races. There were three starters in the 2:11 trot — 
Alan, Stamboulette and Pero Belle. Alan won in 
straight heats, the fastest mile being the second, which 
was trotted in 2:12}. It was not much of a race, as the 
first heat was in 2:14 and the last in 2:17$. 

Sensational pacing by the three great pacers, Little 
Boy, Major Muscovite and Riley B., was the feature of 
the fifth and last day of the Great Western Circuit 
races on the Davenport mile track. In the fourth 
heat of the 2:07 pace Little Boy began to act badly just 
after the word was given, and he did not reach the 
quarter post until 12 seconds after Rilev B. and Major 
Muscovite had passed it going neck and neck. Then 
Little Boy settled down and Palmer drove to keep 
from getting the flag. Little Boy made the last half 
in 1:01 and came under the wire in a jog. The race 
was won by Little Boy, the best time being 2:07}. 
Riley B.'s sensational work was in the second heat, 
when Ervin made a drive that landed the black stallion 
in second place, pacing the last quarter in 29 seconds. 

In the 2:30 trot, the bay horse Captain Bracken was 
the favorite, but B. O. Van Bokkelen drove the Ham- 
bletonian Wilkes gelding, Vic Schellar, to victory and 
gave the horse a mark of 2:18} in the last heat. The 
first heat was won by Luzon in 2:21}, Vic Schellar fin- 
ishing fourth. Van Bokkelen went to the front in the 
next heat, however, and won handily in 2:18}. He also 
won the third and fourth in 2:20} and 2:18}. 

The 2:14 trot was won by Ida Sultan after five heats 
had been trotted, the gray mare Bessie Gilbert winning 
the first two in 2:14}, three seconds faster time than 
any of the others were trotted. 



The Weight Rule. 

Some writers are advocating a change in the rule 
that requires a trotter or pacer to carry 150 pounds 
weight besides the harness and wagon or sulky. Wo 
believe that the best interest of the light harness in- 
dustry will be served by keeping the rule as it now 
stands. One strong objection to requiring less weight 
is that it would have a tendency to encourage the pro- 
duction of a class of horses deficient in weight pulling 
capacity. 

There is no doubt but that some horses perhaps 
most of them, could make faster time pulling an ex- 
pert driver that weighs only one hundred pounds than 
they could with an equally skillful driver weighing 150 
pounds, or the 100-pound driver with an additional 
weight of 50 pounds of lead or other material in the 
sulky, but is there any demand abroad for a trotter or 
pacer that can't win races pulling a light ball-bearing 
pneumatic-tired sulky with 150 pounds weight in it? 
Will gentlemen pay high prices for such horses for 
pleasure driving on the boulevard, and especially on 
hilly roads? 

Another serious objection is that it would place a 



premium on light-weight drivers and place some of the 
best and most competent trainers and drivers at a dis- 
advantage. The average weight of drivers is probably 
not less than 150 pounds, and some of the best of them 
exceed that. By requiring horses to pull at least 150 
pounds weight exclusive of sulky or wagon and harness 
they are placed very nearly on an equality, or at least 
much more so -than with less weight. 

The object of the National Trotting Association is to 
improve the breed of horses, to encourage breeders to 
produce better animals. It seems to us that a rule re- 
quiring less weight would have a tendency to defeat 
this object. The ability to pull weight is a valuable 
quality, and one that breeders should not be encour- 
aged to neglect. — American Horse Breeder. 



News From the North. 



Windsor Summaries. 



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July 8—2:25 class, trotting, purse $800. 

A. J. D., b g by Anderson Wilkes (Huston) 

Springdale, br h by Kingmaker (Wilson) 

Annie Mace, gr m by McGregor (McCarthy) 

Pet Swazey, blk m by Neptune (McDonald) 

Algoneta, b m by Eros (Thompson) 

Eva Direct, b m by Direct (Nethaway) 

Time— 2:18%, 2:16^, 2:16%. 

2:21 class, pacing, purse $600. 

John H , b g by John R. Gentry (Munson) 5 

College Boy, b h by Wildbrino (Markham) 1 

Little Tim b g by Sir Tom (Glassford) 3 

Mollie Knox, br m by Wilkie Knox (Russ) 2 

Andy O., b g (Flynn) 4 

Time— 2:14}^, 2:15V4, 2:18%, 2:20. 

2:12 class, trotting, purse $600. 

Cornelia Belle, b mby Onward (Kirby) 

Starmont, ch h by Earlmont (Gray) 

Satin Slippers, blk m by Delancy (Colby) 

Phrase b m by Onward (Lockwood) 

Venus II., b m by Cupid (M. Sanders) 

Time— 2:12H, [2:12^, 2:12Ji. 

July 9—2:30 class, pacing, purse $600. 

Star Pugh, ch g by Tom Pugh (Lockwood) 

Mysotis, ch m by Allie Wilkes (Darnaby) 

Challie Downing, ch m by Anderson Wilkes (Houston) 

Edleman, ch gjby Simmocolon (Munson) 

Rajah, b g by Chas. Derby (Thompson) 

Time-2:12J^, 2:12>/ 2 , 2:12%. 

2:17 class, trotting, purse $800. 

Metallas, b h by Mambrino King (Eldridge) 

Charlie Mac, blk g by McKinney (Durfee) 

Stockton, b g by Red Wing (Mitchell) 

Sybil H., ch m by Acmon (Goldberg) 

Time— 2:13%, 2:12'/ 2 , 2:14^. 

2:12 class, pacing, purse $600. 

Harold H., b g by Roadmaster (Swarts) 

Twinkle, b m by Mercury (Styles) 

My Choice, ch g by Nuttingham (Lewis) 

Purioso, br h by Sunrise Patchen (Lewis) 

Major Marshall, b h by Billy Wilkes 

Captain Sphinx, b g by Sphinx (Miller) 

Emma M., b m by Cecilian Prince (McDonald) 

Queen R., b m by Redondo (Durfee) 

Texas Jessie, b m by Texas Jack (Pox) 

Time— 2:10J<, 2:10M, 2:11 Vi- 

July 10— 2:15 class, pacing, purse $600. 

Dan Patch, b h, by Joe Patchen (McHenry) 

Winfleld Stratton, b h by Saraway (McGuirej 

Captain Brino, blk s, by Wildbrino (Kennedy) 

Meda Medium, b m by Riley Medium (Hoffman) 

Silver Heels, g g. by Clipper Brooks (Helm) 

Ferrum, b g by Guy Princeton (Garfield) 

Time— 2:07'/ 2 , 2:10, 2:09. 

2:30 class, trotting, purse $600. 
Betsey Ross, b m by Wilkes Boy ... (Nethaway) 7 4 6 3 

Zaco. b h by Artillery (McCarthy) 17 16 

The King, br g by Sphinx (Colby) 5 3 2 1 

Toledo Bee, ch g by Robt. McGregor 

(Lockwood) 3 5 3 4 

Monte, ch m by Montreal (McEwen) 8 6 7 2 

Ruth Ardella, b m by Tommy Wilkes 

(Mackenzie) 4 15 7 

Opera Fan, b m by Geneva (Milloy) 6 2 4 5 

Topsy H. blk m by Jacksonian (Kilby) 2 8 dr 

Eddie W, b g, by Nuttingham (Snyder) 9 dr 

Time-2:19 l / 2 , 2:20H, 2:22%, 2:28^, 2:20'/ 2 , 2:28, 2:35. 

2:09 class, pacing, purse $800. 

White Hose, ch m by Whitefbot (Munson) 4 

Sidney Pointer, b h by Star Pointer (Moffatt) 1 

Goshen Jim, b g by Moses S (Thompson) 2 

Rey Direct, blk h by Direct (Cecil) 3 

Daisy J., bm by Montjoy (Garfield) 5 

Time— 2:09^, 2:12. 2:11, 2:11^. 

July 11—2:12 class, trotting, purse $600. 

Gunsaulus, b h by Sphinx (Hoffman) 12 11 

Dr. Book, b g by McKinney (Durfee) 4 12 2 

Our Lucky, b h by Gibraltar (Donnelly) 2 4 4 4 

Dot Miller, b m by Epoch (Walker) 3 3 3 3 

Time— 2:14M, 2:14!4, 2:13'4, 2:12}<. 

2:25 class, pacing, purse $800. 

Billy H., b h by Alex Dumas (Fisher) 

Stanton Wilkes, ch h by Nutwood Wilkes. . ..(Donnelly) 

Dainty Queen, blk m by Peeler (Munson) 

Westland, br g (Collins) 

Mysotis, ch m by Allie Wilkes (Barneby) 

College Queen, br m (McLaughlin) 

Time— 2:1014, 2:10^, 2:13'/ 2 . 2:12'/ 2 . 

2:20 class, trotting, purse $600. 

Ida Highwood, b m by Highwood (Huston) 

Iva Dee, b f by Onward (D. Thomas) 

Minks, ch m by Minoemeat (Ryan) 

Superior Lilly, ch m by Superior (Proctor) 

Truffles grm (McDonald) 

Bertha Baron, b m (Thomas) 

Bowrene, b m (Blockwood) 

Charlie Tuttle, bh (Collins) 

Salvador, ch g (Maras) 

Timo-2:14%,2:13!/ 2 ,2:15. 

July 12— 2:18 class; pacing. 

Fleoty, b m by Willowood (Fleming) 2 

Manzanllla. b m by Pentland (Wickersham) 1 

Guinette, blk h by Gladstone (Anderson) 3 

Thornway, b h by Steinway (Thompson) 4 

Ohio, br m by Mar Carplo (Fern) 5 

Time-2:19tf, 2:12*, 2:11!4 2:13. 

2:10 class; trotting. 

Alice Barnes, br'm by Election (Spear) 2 

Dolly Dillon, b m by Sfdnoy Dillon (Saunders) 1 

Annie Burns, gr m by Bobby Burns (Taylor) 3 

Phoebe Childers, b m by Sir Rhodorlck (Clawson) 4 

Time— 2:11X, 2:11%, 2:12!4, 2:13/,. 



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[Portland Rural Spirit, July 12.] 

The track record at Everett was lowered from 2:17 
to 2:15} by Pathmark. 

W. W. Smith of Lafayotte is doing a big stud busi- 
ness with his stallions Vinmont 2:21 and Malbrino. 

Messrs. A. T. Van De Vanter and Jas. Erwin's stables 
will remain in training at Everett, Wash., for the 
present. 

Saltese 2:29}, Santiam (p) 2:24}, Francisco (p) 2:25, 
all sired by Caution, went in the list at the Everett 
meeting. 

John Green drove the pacing gelding Nabob by 
Hambletonian Mambrino in 2:25 at Tacoma last week, 
placing him in the list. 

W. O. Trine's Oregon Bull won the 2:20 pace at Butte 
this week and took a record of 2:19. Ho is a new per- 
former for Roy Wilkes. 

Cris Simpson called at this office on his way home 
from tho Everett meeting. He says they had a rous- 
ing big meeting. On the Fourth 8000 people turned 
out. 

C. P. Webb sent his pacer Prince Tom 2:25} to A. E. 
Heller's stable at the State Fair grounds, where he wiil 
receive the finishing touches for the season campaign. 

Frank Barrows of Walla Walla has sent his three 
year old trotter Phal Norte by Del Norte to Sam Casto 
to be conditioned for the races. ' He is a very promis- 
ing looking three year old. 

Frank Frazier won the 2:22 pace at Butte last Satur- 
day with his green pacer Hassalo, giving him a record 
of 2:19 and placing another new performer to the 
credit of his stallion Westfield. 

F. W. Baltes has bought the pacing mare Alta Dell 
2:16, and will drive her with his pacing gelding Altas 
2:15}. They should make the nobbiest and fastest 
team on the coast, as they are both level-headed and 
good at the pole. 

Cris Simpson has engaged Bob Breeze to handle his 
stable of harness horses for the season. Cris' time will 
be fully occupied with his wheat crop for the next two 
or three months. His horses will remain at Everett 
for the present. 

J. B. Stetson passed through this week on his way 
to Salem. His stable contained Lady Alfred 2:19}, 
Major Rudd (3) 2:30, Lyla 2:27, and Altatiel. The last 
two are full sisters to Chehalis 2:04}, and, together with 
Lady Alfried, will be bred to Zombro 2:11. 

Will Taylor has shipped the bay pacing mare Made* 
line to Salem, where he will work her. She was 
recently sold by J. B. Stetion to Ed McLaughlin of 
Salt Lake City, Utah, and will be started in the slow 
classes this year, and should be quite a good mare, as 
she could beat 2:20 in her three year old form. 

E. E. Staats has moved over to the State Fair 
grounds with his stable of harness horses. He has 
Isabel, a green trotter by Coeur d'Alene, out of an 
Altamont mare, and Delmont, a two year old pacer by 
Del Norte, out of an Altago mare. The two year old 
is entered in the Breeders' stake and will start in the 
pacing division. 

R. B. Rutherford has arrived at Salem from Walla 
Walla with three two year olds and a green trotter. 
Two of the two year olds are sired by Chehalis and are 
owned by Judge Brentz of Walla Walla, and the other 
is by Del Norte, owned by Mr. Rutherford. They are 
all entered in the two year old stake. The trotter, 
Lady Mack, belongs to H. A. Gardner and is entered 
in the $1000 stake at North Yakima for 2:30 trotters. 

Tacoma gave a race meeting on July 4th, which 
drew out a very good crowd of people to witness some 
sharp contests. The first event was a half mile and 
repeat race between Billy Edwards and Sorrel Dick. 
Edwards won, time 0:55. The next event was a mixed 
race between the pacer Nabob and the trotter Ben 
Star. Nabob won, best time 2:25. The big event of 
the day was the special race between the noted veteran 
of the' turf, Hamrock 2:17',, Estella (p) 2:17}, Combin- 
ation George (p) 2:18. Combination George won in 
straight heats, Estella second. Best time, 2:18, which 
is considered very fast for the track. The last race 
was one-quarter mile dash between the pacers Maple- 
mont and Sleepy Tom. Maplemont won in 0:37. 

Races at Hilo. 



The four year old brown stallion Lincoln by Limon- 
ero 2:15} out of the dam of Media 2:14} was sold by 
Medina Stock Farm, Michigan, last week for $3000. 
M. Hoffman of New York City was the purchaser. 



A well-attended race meeting was held at Hoolulu 
Park, island of Hilo, H. I., on July 4th, 5th and 6th, 
this year. The Hawaiian Gazette says of the meeting: 
Tho sport was of an interesting nature and the major- 
ity of the events wore well contested. The crowds on 
Friday and Saturday were naturally somowhat smaller 
than was the case on Thursday, but the racing was of 
better class and productive of several exciting finishes. 
On each day tho band enlivened the proceedings. Sev- 
eral new track rocords wore created, among them bo- 
ing the half mile :49}, by Molly Connors, and the mile 
1:47}, by Dixie Land. Old Amarino took three purses, 
Billy McCloskey two, Violin two, Frank S. throo and 
Dixie Land two. With few oxcoptions the horses ran 
truo to form, tho biggost surprise being the defeat of 
Billy McCloskey by Dixie Land, on tho last day of tho 
meeting. The Alexander Button mare Violin beat 
Wayboy in two races, the fastest time of any of the 
hoats being 2:26}. 

Chas. Dorby has a new 2:20 performer in the pacing 
mare Christabel that took a record in that notch at 
Butte the othor day. Andy McDowoll took this mare 
to Montana in 1896 when she was a three year old. 
Christabel's dam, Algerdetta, is by Allandorf, and s 
the dam of Sable Stoinway 2:23}, Allandora 2:18} and 
the three year old Thornway, owned by Col. J. C. 
Kirk patrick of this city that James Thompson took 
East to race this year. 



4 



[July 20, 1901 



THE WEEKLY j 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



F. W. KELLEY, Propkietou. 



rurf and Sporting Authority ot the Pacific Coast, 

— OFFICE — 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



P. O BOX 2300. 



Terras— One Tear S3, Six Months 91.75, Three Months SI 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Keixey, 36 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 

G. G. TUKKI & CO., Agents. Subscription and advertising. 

Salisbury Hullding, Melbourne, Australia 



San Francisco, Saturday, July 20, iqoi. 



Dates Claimed. 



VANCOUVER, B. C Aug. 31 to Sept. 1 

BUTTE and ANACONDA June 29-60 days 

EVERETT, Wash Sept. 9-15 

BOISE, Idaho (State Fair) — , Sept. 16-21 

CARSON CITY, Nev Sept. 22-28 

SALEM, Oregon (State Fair) Sept. 23-28 

NEW WESTMINSTER (Provincial Fair) Oct. 1-5 

LA GRANDE, Oregon Oct. 1-5 

THE DALLES, Oregon (District Fair) Oct. 1-5 

LEWISTON. Idaho (Inter-State Fair) Oct. 7-12 

VICTORIA, B. C Oct. 7-12 

BAKER CITY, Oregon October 6-12 

SPOKANE, Wash Sept. 10-21 



THE GRAND CIRCUIT. 

CLEVELAND July 22-27 

COLUMBUS July 29 to Aug. 3 

BUFFALO Aug. 5-10 

GLENS FALLS Aug. 12-17 

READVILLE Aug. 19-24 

HARTFORD Sept. 2-6 

SYRACUSE Sept. 9-13 

PROVIDENCE Sept. 26-30 

TERRE HAUTE Sept. 30 to Oct. 5 

CALIFORNIA. 

P. C. T. H. B. A., SACRAMENTO July 29 to Aug. 3 

SANTA ROSA August 12 to 17 

WOODLAND, District No. 40 August 26-31 

CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR, Sacramento Sept. 2-14 

FERNDALE, Humboldt Sept. 10-14 

STOCKTON Sept. 16 to 21 

CONCORD, (District No. 23) Sept. 23 to 28 

LOS ANGELES Sept. 28 to Oct. 12 incl 



THE WOODLAND PAIR. Everybody has been 
talking about it for months, and now that the 
race program is out they will be getting their entries 
ready and making arrangements to be thoro when the 
races start. The Woodland fair is second only to the 
State Fair and not far behind that big exposition. 
One reason is that the Board of Directors of District 
No. 40 are all wide awake enterprising men and work 
like Trojans for the fair's success. Another is that 
the people of the entire district take a pride in the 
fair, contribute liberally to the fair fund and endorse 
the action of the Supervisors and city trustees in ap- 
propriating money to help it along. The Knockers 
Club always fails to get its, work inlat Woodland when 
the annual district fair is talked about. It is probable 
that the officials of tho district board set '.such a hot 
pace at tho start and keep driving so hard that the 
knockers get discouraged and don't go to the post at 
all. At any rate, everybody in Yolo county and Sac- 
ramento, too, seems to be pulling for the success of the 
Woodland fair this year and it's Kelly Briggs 2:10 to 
the ghost of an army mule that it will be the best ever 
held in the northern part of the State. By referring 
to our advertising columns the racing program will be 
found, and it will be seen that entries close July 29th, 
which is one week from next Monday, and one day 
prior to the opening of the Breeders meeting at Sacra- 
mento, so that if you enter at Woodland in the slowest 
class a record of two minutes made at Sacramento or 
Santa Rosa will not bar you from starting at Wood- 
land. Look over the classes given and make your 
entry in time. 



SANTA ROSA'S FAMOUS TRACK will again be 
the scene of a high class race meeting this year. 
The newly organized Santa Rosa Association of which 
Mr. P. H. Quinn is President and Thomas Bonner 
Secretary has announced a six day meeting for the 
week of August 12th and advertised ten good purses 
for harness horses. It is proposed to give two harness 
evente and two or more running races each day. As 
every horseman knows, the Santa Rosa track is one of 
the best mile tracks in America, and horses go faster 
there than anywhere in the State. Santa Rosa is one 
of the most enterprising of California towns, while its 
climate is as near perfection as can be found. One 
week will intervene between the closing of the Breed- 
ers meeting at Sacramento and thr: opening day at 
Senta Rosa, and another will intervene between the 
dosing of the Santa Rosa meeting and the opening of 



E the Woodland meeting. Thus it will be seen that 
those who race at the Breeders meeting and do not 
enter at Santa Rosa will have a three weeks lay off 
during which time there will be no possible chance for 
them to earn a cent with their horses. Arrangements 
will be made for a special train to convey horses to 
Santa Rosa from Sacramento on Sunday, August 4th, 
the day following tho Breeders meeting. Entries to 
the Santa Rosa harness events will close August 3d, 
which is the last day of the breeders meeting and as 
Woodland's entries close July 29th, the records made 
at Santa Rosa will not be bars to starting at Wood- 
land. Santa Rosa has always been popular with tho 
California horsemen. The new association there should 
have a big entry list and a liberal patronage to encour- 
age it to give a meeting every year. 



COL. J. C. KIRKPATRICK left this week for the 
East and will be absent four or five weeks during 
which time he will see some of the racing on the Grand 
Circuit. The Colonel will also gain a much needed rest 
from business affairs. He is about the busiest man in 
San Francisco, as in addition to managing the Palace 
Hotel and the Sharon estate, he is a member of the 
Harbor Commission, Yosemite Commission, a director 
of the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Associa- 
tion and member of the Pacific District Board of Ap- 
peals of the National Trotting Association. And he 
keeps his health by driving fast horses on the roads 
through the Park and on the beach every day. He is 
the owner of the three year old colt Thornwav that 
James Thompson took East and is interested in the 
racing qualities of Goshen Jim 2:10}. We hope that 
he may have a pleasant trip and escape any spells of 
hot weather that may be moving about the Eastern 
country. 

CAPT. TOM MERRY of Los Angeles, a pioneer 
Californian, at one time editor of the Breeder 
and Sportsman, and one of the best posted and en- 
tertaining writers on the thoroughbred horse that ever 
picked up a pen, arrived in San Francisco this week 
with his estimable wife on his way to British Columbia, 
where the Captain will enjoy a couple of weeks trout 
fishing and then leave for Europe by way of New York. 
The Captain and Mrs. Merry will visit France, Ireland 
and England, and return to America in tho fall, pos9ibly 
passing the winter at Mobile, Alabama. During his 
trip the Captain will send to this journal a number of 
letters descriptive of what he sees, and his keen eyes 
miss very little that comes within their range, while 
his descriptive faculties are of a high order. His 
letters will be an attractive feature of the Breeder 
and Sportsman's columns during the time he is in 
Europ9 and while sojourning in the South during the 
coming winter. 



THE CONCORD FAIR will open September 25th, 
this year, and continue four days. Entries to its 
races will dose September 20th. and the program has 
already been arranged and will be found among the 
advertisements in this paper. Thore are two purses 
of $300 each for pacers and trottors, the 2:25 class 
pacers, 2:30 and 2:40 class trotters being given $250 
each. Other purses for harness horses range from $100 
to $150. Runners are also provided for. The Concord 
fair is one of the best little country fairs held on the 
Pacific slope, is well managed and well attended. No 
better outing can bo had than a visit to the annual fair 
at the little town of Concord in Contra Costra county 
next September. Write to Secretary A. B. McKenzie 
at Martinoz for premium lists and entry blanks. 



THE BRKEDERS MEETING is sure to be a great 
success. The program for each day will be ar- 
ranged in time for publication next week and it will be 
the best issued by the Association in years. Much in- 
terest is being manifested among horsemen all over the 
State and a very largo attendance is expected. The 
Southern Pacific Railroad Company has granted a re- 
duced rate during the last two days of the meeting 
of one fare and a third for the round trip on all roads 
leading to Sacramento. Tho races for members of the 
driving clubs of San Francisco and Sacramento have 
aroused a great deal of friendly rivalry and will be 
very hotly contested as the horses are well classified. 
The six $1000 purses will furnish enough sport in them- 
seves for a five days program and there is not one but 
will result in a good betting race. 



A HUNDRED HORSES AT AUCTION on Tues- 
day next, sale beginning at 10 a. m. sharp at the 
Occidental Horse Exchange, 721 Howard street. This 
lot of horses is a choice selection of a hundred head 
from those purchased by the German Government for 
artillery purposes. They weigh from 1000 to 1350 
pounds and have passed the veterinaries. This is a 
good opportunity to get work horses at your own 
valuation. 



Notes From Sacramento Track. 

[By our Special Correspondent.] 

Sacramento, July 17, 1901. 

Everybody in this part of the State that knows a 
horse from a cow is talking about the approaching 
Breeders meeting and predicting its success. 

Vet Tryon has ten horses in his string and some very 
promising green ones among them. Margaretta 2:15 
by Direct worked a mile in 2:16 the other day. 

Holmes is getting Pansy in shape for the road race 
and has a lot of green ones that are doing good work. 

Ed Lafferty has a string of six. His handsome 
stallion Boydollo trotted a mile in 2:15 the other day 
very nicely. He is entered in the 2:14 trot. 

Al McDonald has a couple — one [entered in the 2:20 
class, the other entered in the 2:40 class; the last one has 
stepped a mile in 2:15 

Mr. Alex Brown, of Walnut |Grove, has 6 horsos. 
His trainer, C. A. Spencer, is going slow with them, 
but they will be heard from later— when they start. 

Wheeler, of Chico, has Harry J., that worked 3 
miles this morning, one as good as 2:16: he also has a 
pacer entered in the green class. 

Brown from Red Bluff has three green ones — Bank- 
er's Daughter has paced 3 heats as good as 2:16. She 
is entered in green pacing purses. He also has Prince 
L., a trotter entered in green classes that is a good one 

Mr. Mulholland has Osito entered in the 2:14 trot.' 
He worked in 2:16 easy. He has also the pacing mare 
Edna R. She worked a mile in 2:13. Another of his 
string is Peter Jackson, a trotter without a record. 

Sam Hoy has five. Kelly Briggs worked a half in 
1:04 easily and a green pacer of his by McKinney, en- 
tered in the green class, also worked a half in 1:04. 

Hi Hogoboom has seven. Arthur W. 2:12}, pacer, 
worked a half this morning in 1:06. Duke of Wald- 
stein, a trotter owned by Mr. John Rupdy, worked a 
half in 1:10, and Central Girl 2:22} by Nutwood Wilkes 
worked a mile in 2:20. 

Geo. Buck man, a green trotter owned by James 
Faris, worked a half in 1:09. 

Mr. Kelly, of Washington, has his mare Anzela 2:13 
entered in the 2:14 class. I heard she worked in 2:13 
lately. 

Mr. O'Kane's horse Sandow by Dictatus worked a 
mile in 2:18. 

Mr. Steve Trefry has two Directs— little fellows, but 

they can fly. 

Mrs. Callendine'e pacer Abdine 2:17} ^worked a mile 
in 2:20 easy this week. 

Frank Wright's Baby Button, Payne's Peo and 
Frank Ruhstallor's pacers are all doing well. 

Mr. Brown, of Alameda, has just arrived with Doc 
Wilkes and two others 

Joe Smith, from Vallejo, is here with Gaff Topsail 
and several others. 

Dora Doe's trainer, Mr. Mose Hart, has five or six 
he is going easy with. There are some good green 
ones among them. Dora Doe is being entered in the 
free for all races. 

Steve Upson's pacer is doing well for a young horse 
and I think will make a mark. 

Mr. Ward, of Alameda, has arrived with two three 
year olds that are both doing well. 

Mr. Clark has just arrived with his horse by Stam- 
boul. He just came to work him and not to race. 

There is lots of speed at the trask every morning 
and the Breeders meeting is bound to be a great 
success. Dell See. 

Entries for Club Races. 

The Breeders association has given three $200 purses 
for horses owned and driven by members of the Golden 
Gate Park Driving Association of this city, to take 
place at its meeting in Sacramento. The entries given 
below show that the horses have been well classified 
and three close contests are certain. 

GOLDEN GATE STAKES-$200. 
Mr. A. J. Joseph names b g Durfee Mac by McKinney. 
Mr. A. Jabobs names b s Eden Vale by Eros. 
Mr. Jas. O'Kane names s g Sandow by Dictatus. 
Mr. D. R. Misner names b g Sable Le Grande by Sable Wilkes. 
Mr. D Roberts names s g Algregor by Steinway. 

THE SPEEDWAY STAKES-45200. 
Mr. I. B Dalzlel names brm Belle Hansen by Almonition. 
Mr. Geo. L. Swett names b g Steve S. 
Mr. J. W. Bonney names b g Joe Bonney. 
Mr. D. A. McLaughlin names gr m Alameda Maid. 
Mr. C. E. Parks names s g Imp by Diablo. 
Mr. J. G. Cuicello names b g Denny Healy by Gossiper. 

SAN FRANCISCO STAKES-*200. 
Mr. J. Doran names b g Tirado by Azmcor. 
Mr. H. VV. Meek names b m Cricri by Direct. 
Mr. Geo. Gray names blk m Cyrene by Guide. 
Mr. J. G. Cuicello names b g Puerto Rioo by Sable Wilkes. 
Mr. Neil Prendergast names b g Bolliver. 

• ♦ 

Alameda Track Open to All on Sundays. 

Alameda, July 18, 1901. 
Editor Breerer and Sportsman — If you have 
the space to spare will you please state in the Breeder 
that for the balance of the season the Alameda Speed 
track will be thrown open to the public on Sundays, 
free of charge. The only requirement will be that 
those using it conduct themselves in an orderly manner 
and observe the regular rules of a track, viz: Turn 
out to the left and speed only the right way of the 
track. Of course those who use the track on other 
days and for regular training purposes will be expected 
to pay andithus help keep the track in condition. 

Yours very truly, JA. O. Gott, Seo'y. 



July 20, 1901] 



5 



Opening of the Grand Circuit. 

Never has there been a more auspicious opening of 
the Grand Circuit of harness racing than Monday last 
at the famous Point Grosse track at Detroit where the 
annual Blue Ribbon meeting is held. The weather 
was warm but almost perfect and a large attendance 
was there to see the contests. 

The Chamber of Commerce Stake of $5000 for pacers 
of the 2:24 class was the principal feature of the day's 
sport, although each one of the four events was a high 
class race. Star Pugh, the chestnut gelding by Tom 
Pugh, was the favorite on the strength of his easy win 
at Windsor one week previous where he put in three 
heats in 2:12 and a fraction, and did it with such ease 
that 2:10 was predicted for him when he struck Detroit, 
a prediction which he fulfilled in this race. Dr. 
Boucher's good colt Harry Logan was played some, 
and considerable money was played on Plenty, the 
gelding by Superior owned at Sioux City, Iowa. Star 
Pugh won in straight heats, pacing the first in 2:092 
with Harry Logan a good second. The son of Miss 
Logan remained in second position during the race 
and was awarded second money which amounted to 
$1250 or $750 clear of entrance. There were eleven 
starters to face the flag and according to the summary 
telegraphed the California horses Rajah and Stanton 
Wilkes got no part of the money. The winner is by 
Tom Pugh 8007, a producing son of Red Wilkes and is 
out of a mare called Maggie Casey by Charles Casey. 

The McKinney horse Dr. Book, that W. G. Durfee 
campaigned over east two years ago, driving him to a 
record of 2:13|, made a splendid showing in the 2:14 
trot on the opening day, winning the first two heats 
and reducing his record to 2:12}, but the black mare 
Lady Thisbe by Milroi 20,585 out of Lady Wilton 
2:11 J by Wilton, beat him the next three heats and 
forced him to take second money. Lady Thisbe took 
a record of 2:11} in this race. She was bred by the 
late Marcus Daly on his Bitter Root farm in Montana. 
The California mare Janice 2:13} b / William Harold 
was a starter in this race, but is given the last position 
in the summary. 

The 2:20 trot for a purse of $1500 was best two heats 
in three. All Right a bay gelding by Enright, won 
the first heat in 2:12} and Ida Highwood, the favorite, 
took the next two, her best time being 2:13j{. Vic 
Schellar started in this race but finished fifth, just out- 
side the money. Ida Highwood is a bay mare by 
Highwood, the Isire of Caid 2:07} and others, and her 
dam is by California, a son of Sultan out of old Minne- 
haha, the dam of Beautiful Bells. 

James Butler's mare Hetty G. 2:05}, took the last 
race of the opening day right off the reel in two 
straight heats, pacing one of them in 2:05}, a wonder, 
fully fast mile for the first time out this year. She 
had Riley B. 2:06}, Edith W. 2:06}, Bonnie Direct 2:05}, 
Paul Revere 2:07}; Dariel 2:07}, Harry O., 2:06 and 
Eyelet 2:062 behind her in that order. 

There were ten thousand people on the second day 
of the meeting to see the Merchants & Manufacturers 
stake of $10,000 trotted. The Calif ornians present 
were greatly pleased to see the Palo Alto bred four 
year old filly Eleata, by Dexter Prince, capture the 
first money in three straight heats, the last heat being 
in 2:08J, two full seconds faster than a heat had ever 
been trotted in this great annual event. Fifteen 
horses scored up for the word in the first heat with 
Neva Simmons at the pole. After considerable scor- 
ing the word was given and the Simmons mare went 
to the front, but broke before the first turn was 
reached and Eleata went to the front in the back 
stretch and held it to the wire trotting the mile in 
2:12. Neva Simmons was second in this heat, trotting 
very fast after Price, her driver, got her squared 
away. In the second heat Eleata was first all the way 
although the chestnut gelding Country Jay by Jay 
Hawker, made a splendid showing and came very 
strong through the stretch. In the third heat Eleata 
showed still more speed and came under the wire in 
2:08J, with driver Marsh looking back over his shoulder 
and shaking his head at the others. Of the stakes 
$2000 was held out for the consolation stake on Thurs- 
day and the remainer with the added money went as 
follows: Eleata $5650, Country J. $3250, Neva Simmons 
$1350. This is the first time since Emma Offutt's vic- 
tory in 1896, that the M. & M. has been won in straight 
heats. The only California owned horse that started 
in the stake was Mr. A. L. Mulcahy's mare Algonetta by 
Eros and in the summary her place was eleventh. 

The 2:16 class pace on the same day was won by 
Braden, a son of Brown Hal in straight heats in 2:10} 
and 2:12. 

But three horses started in the 2:08 class trot — 
Boralma, The Monk and Kingmond. Boralma won in 
two straight heats and in the second reduced his 
record three-fourths of a second, trotting the mile in 
2:07}. 

Wednesday was decidedly a California day at the 
Detroit track, three of four races being won by Cali- 



fornia horses, while Coney, the hoppled pacer by Mc- 
Kinney, lowered his own and the track record to 2:02 in 
the free for all pace. The first race was the Russel 
House stakes of $2500 for the 2:17 class trotters. There 
were seven starters in this event including the Mam- 
brino King horse Metallas that won at Windsor the 
week previous, beating Charlie Mac and other good 
ones and he was made favorite. He took the first heat 
in 2:12}, but young Durfee landed his big gelding 
Charlie Mac first under the wire in the next three 
heats, the fastest of which was 2:14}. Metallas took 
second money, Sybil H. second, Al K. third, while 
Belle Curry, Marique and Clara Kimball were classed 
as "also started." 

Dan Patch, the son of Joe Patchen that paced to a 
record of 2:07} at Windsor had an easy thing- of it in 
the Wayne Hotel purse of $2500 for pacers of the 2:14 
class, winning in straight heats, the fastest of which 
was 2:08. Captain Sphinx, Amorel, Fred the Kid and 
Lady All Right were the other starters and were 
placed in the order here given in the final summary. 

Anaconda and Coney demonstrated the fact in the 
free for all pace in which Indiana 2:04| and Connor 
2:03} were the other starters, that they are not only 
in better form this year than ever, but that their new 
trainers Jack Trout and Andy McDowell can handle 
them as well as anyone. Coney paced a wonderful 
mile for the first start of the year, making the mile in 
2:02 flat, reducing his own and the track record. It 
was no disgrace for him to be beaten by Anaconda, 
one of the greatest race horse pacers that ever wore 
harness, especially as it was the fastest three heats 
ever paced in a race. Indiana had the pole in the first 
heat. The four horses were sent off to a perfect start. 
As they rounded the first turn Coney took the pole 
and led with Anaconda next. When they flashed by 
the quarter pole everyone realized that it was a fast 
quarter and enthusiastic cheers greeted the figures 
that were hung out by the timers — 29^ seconds. With 
Coney still in the lead they passed the half mile post 
in 1 minute flat, the three-quarter polo in 1:31 } , and 
Coney whizzed under the wire in 2:02 flat, winner by 
three lengths. 

In the second heat Coney was favorite in the auction 
pools at $50 to $25 for the field. It was a fair start and 
Coney and Anaconda were in front, racing together at 
the quarter, which was done in 29 seconds flat. Just 
as the figures were hung out Coney broke and Ana- 
conda shot ahead alone. With the others five lengths 
behind he paced the half in 59} seconds, one »f the best 
performances ever seen, and duplicated Coney's time 
to the three-quarters, 1:31}. The mile, however, was 
three-quarters of a second slower, 2:02|. Coney made 
up a great deal of the ground he had lost by his break, 
but was several lengths behind at the finish. 

Anaconda won all the way in the last heat, and 
Connor was second, McDowell not driving Coney hard 
as he had second money won and saw he could not 
beat the Kangaroo horse. 

Dolly Dillon, daughter of Sidney Dillon and Dolly 
by Electioneer, walked off with the 2:10 trot in straight 
heats, the fastest 2:llf. Satin Slippers 2:13, King 
Chimes 2:10|, Stamboulette 2:10}, Phoebe Childers 
2:101 and Annie Burns 2:101 were the other starters in 
this race. According to the brief summary received 
by telegraph Stamboulette was fourth and thereby 
saved his entrance, while Phoebe Childers was fifth. 
Second money went to Satin Slippers and third to 
King Chimes. Every horseman in California is pleased 
over the showing made by Millard Sanders, the trainer 
and driver of Dolly Dillon, and hope to see him land 
her in front in many more races on the Grand Circuit 
and bring her back home this fall with a record below 
the 2:10 mark. She is a great little mare and Mr 
Sanders one of our best trainers. 

There is evidently nothing the matter with Cresceus 
2:04 this year, as on Thursday in the free for all trot, 
with Charley Herr 2:07, as his only competitor, the 
great son of Robert McGregor trotted the two heats 
of the race in 2:06i{ and 2:05, the latter the fastest heat 
ever trotted in a race. We doubt if The Abbot or 
Boralma could have kept up with tho champion stal- 
lion last Thursday had they started against him, and 
this mile in July in 2:05 is evidence that George 
Ketchum, owner and driver of Cresceus, mado no idle 
boast whon he predicted the other .day a mark of 2:02 
for his horse before the end of the racing season. 
Charlie Herr was in good condition and trotted in 
grand style but ho was simply outclassed. Following 
is the time by quarters: First heat — 0:30}, 1:02.}, 1:35}, 
2-.00J. Second heat— 0:34$, 1:02}, 1:35, 2:05. 

The 2:27 trot took six hoats to decide, Coxey, a bay 
gelding by Judge Cox, a grandson of Phallas, winning 
the last three, Springdalo by Kingmaker, had takon 
the first in 2:16, and Meta Arthur by King Arthur tho 
second and third in 2:14$ and 2:15. Coxey's best time 
was 2:16}. Van Bokkelen by hard work kept Vic 
Schellar close up every time and saved his entrance 
money. Seven other horses, all owned in the East, 
were starters. 

Goshen Jim and Rey Direct were among the also 



started crowd at the close of the 2:09 pace which was 

won by Sphinx S. after seven heats had been paced. 
Sidney Pointer won the first heat in 2:07}, Argetta got 
the second in 2:08^. George took the third and fourth 
one of them in 2:08}, and Sphinx S. a grandson of 
Electioneer won the next three, his fastest heat 2:09}. 
The positions of the other starters at the end of the 
race were as follows: Carmine, Arbuteskan, White 
Hose, Goshen Jim, Rey Direct and Annie Thornton. 



The Montana Meeting. 

[Butto Inter-Mountain. July 15.] 

There has been much said and written of the Mon- 
tana Jockey Club and the race meet being conducted 
by it. Some of the comment has been favorable and 
more of it adverse and it is not amiss to say a little 
more and give credit where credit is due. The ofBcials 
of the club have labored hard and assiduously and 
they have worked under many disadvantages, but 
notwithstanding it all, it can be said that the meet is a 
success, everything considered. 

There was considerable dissatisfaction expressed by 
horse owners at the shaving of the purses, and there 
was more dissatisfaction among the talent at the slim- 
ness of the odds offered by the books. Then, too, 
there were frequent kick3 and grumblings, about 
alleged questionable riding and form reversals, that 
looked palpable enough to have been brought about 
for an individual advantage. That is all a thing of the 
past now, and the jockey club to-day enters on the 
third week of its meet, with the knowledge that it has 
done its best to make sport good, has accomplished it 
and above all has satisfied its patrons that everything 
will be on the level and first class, if it is possible to 
make it so. 

The horse owners are no longer dissatisfied and the 
talent feels that it is getting a run for the money in- 
vested. The bookmakers have loosened up and no one 
can, with reason, kick against the odds offered. The 
attention of the Jockey Club officials was called to the 
evident penuriousness of the books and the result is 
that the odds ara now as liberal as could be wished for. 

As far as in and out running is concerned, there is 
little to say, except that the judges have shown that 
they will not tolerate it. On more than one occasion, 
jockeys have been called into the stand and warned 
and the result is that no jock has repeated the offense 
against which he was admonished. All that is neces- 
sary is, for the judges to make it plain, that nonsense 
will not be tolerated and that crooked work will result 
in summary handling of the offenders and all will 
be well. The judges have made it plain that they will 
stand for no funny business and the result is that clean 
sport will be the order of the day. 

Hanford Items. 

Hanford, July 17, 1001. 

The directors of the Kings County Fair Association 
began work yesterday on the fair grounds and race 
track which are to be built one mile west of town. It 
is the intention of the association to be up to date and 
the fair will be second to none in any part of the State. 
The premium list covers all classes of live stock, poul- 
try, grain, fruits, etc., and it is proposed to have a 
regular "down East pumpkin show," while arts and 
mechanical products will receive special attention, 
ranging from a silk gown to a calico dress and from a 
roll of butter to a loaf of "mother's bread." 

The imported horse San Jacinto by Othello died at 
John Arnett's Stock Farm lately. 

S. Eddy has a string of very promising green trotters 
and pacers at work and thinks he has another Goshen 
Jim among them. 

Colonel C. K. Ragan is quite sick and has quit train- 
ing for the present, although he has four fast green 
ones. 

Ed Erlanger has another Toggles he thinks, which 
he is giving road work. 

Frank Johnson, or "Pedigree" Johnson as he is often 
called, is training several runners here. 

It looks as if all the stalls at the new track will be 
fillod by the local horses, as they are being engaged 
before thoy are built. C. 

HOOF BEATS. 

On July 10th the Brighton stewards investigated 
Turner's ride of Wax Taper July 9th, for which he 
was temporarily suspended. They found nothing 
criminal and removed Turner's suspension, but fined 
him $100 for carelessness in handling his mount. 

William K. Vanderbilt has purchased from Julius 
Fleischmann the noted stallion Halma for $25,000, and 
will havo him shipped to France in a short time, where 
he will be continued in the stud. It was recently 
reported that Halma had been sold to Jean De 
Reszko, the opera singer, and that he would be sent to 
Russia, but it now turns out that the sale was not con- 
summated, though negotiations were under way for 
some time. Mr. Vanderbilt has also engaged Burt 
Knapp, the well known Western jockey, to ride for him 
in France during the balance of this season. 



6 



[July 20, 1901 




Sue 2:12} by Athadon. 

Coney 2:02 by McKinney. 

Stanton Wilkes 2:104 by Nutwood Wilkes. 

Eleata 2:08}, winer of the M. & M., by Dexter Prince. 

Agitato 2:09 has been entered in the 2:09 class for 
pacers at Memphis, Tenn. 

Harry Logan 2:12}, second money in Chamber of 
Commerce, by Harry Gear. 

Vance Nuckols will handle C. A. Winship's horses 1 
Mr. Winship has returned to California. 

Sam Hoy has a green pacer by McKinney that is 
showing speed of a high order at Sacramento. 

An offer of $10,000 was recently refused for the 
Buffalo stallion Metellas 2:124 by Mambrino King. 

The Breeders meeting at Sacramento will be the 
best harness meeting given at the capital in years. 

It is said that the three year old Directum Miller, 
by Directum, has been a mile in 2:134 for Roy Miller. 

Last year 4933 horses were importod to Ghent, 
Belgium, 3303 of which were slaughtered for human 
food. 

Thirteen California horses havo been entered at 
Memphis and we hope the number will not prove un- 
lucky. 

One hundred head of trotting bred horses from the 
Hamlins' Village Farm will be sold at auction in Chicago 
this fall. 

Yarrum 2:19}, who a year ago at this time was 
counted a good M. & M. horse, but went lame, is again 
on the shelf. 

The Ann Arbor, Mich., meeting was not a success 
financially and the stockholders were called upon to 
make up a $500 deficit. 

The three year old colt Silver Coin by Steinway, 
that paced to a record of 2:16} at Denver, is the fastest 
three year old of the year up to date. 

Superior is the first sire to secure two new 2:20 per- 
formers this year, Nancy M. 2:18} and Plenty 2:17} 
having given him this honor. 

Herbert Gray, manager of the Lawson stable, pre" 
diets that Boralma 2:08 will trot three heats which will 
average faster than 2:06 before the end of the season. 



Zephyr, the $9000 three year filly by Zombro 2:11 
worked an easy mile in 2:25 at Cleveland the other day 
hitched to a cart. The last quarter was in 32 seconds. 

Doc Tanner worked John A. McKerron below 2:2 
for the first time this year on the 8th instant. The 
son of Nutwood Wilkes put in two miles in 2:19} and 
2:19. 



The trotting track at Cleveland Park, Denver, wil 
have a new coat of clay six inches in depth spread over 
its entire surface. The new management propose to 
make the Denver track one of the best appointed in 
the country. 

According to a summary published in the last issue 
of the American Sportsman, a gray mare called Emily 
O., by McKinney, won third money in the 2:30 pace 
won at Tiffin, Ohio, by the Superior gelding Plenty in 
2:15$, 2:12} and 2:12}. 

When Metallas, the bay stallion by Mambrino King, 
trotted the first heat of the 2:17 trot at Windsor in 
2:13}, he only beat Charlie Mac a short head, and then 
the McKinney horse came back and made him trot the 
next heat in 2:124 to win. 



A purse of $500 was given for 2:11 trotters at Daven- 
port, Iowa, week before last, the starters being Alan 
2:12}, Pero Belle 2:12} and Stamboulette 2:10}. Alan 
won in straight heats and Stamboulette was second. 
The fastest heat was 2:12 J. 

It is estimated that something like two thousand 
horses were killed or disabled by the heat in and about 
New York last week. Nearly every one must be re- 
placed immediately, and dealers say the effect on the 
market is already noticeable. 

C. A. Winship has sold his old gelding Aster 2:12 by 
Dexter Prince to a Cleveland gentleman who will race 
him at the matinees in that city. He has disposed of 
Lady Waldstein 2:15 also and now has but two horses 
left of the consignment he took East. 

S. K. Trefry and Geo. A. Kelly, who have been 
training their horses at Pleasanton, left there for Sac- 
ramento last week. Mr. Trefry has Direct C. and 
Freddie C, and Mr. Kelly has Anzella 2:13} by Antrim. 
All are entered at the Breeders' meeting. 



The owners of the two good mares Trilby P., and 
Ima Electrite aro still unsatisfied as to the speed of 
their respective good ones and have stuck up $500 a 
side to try final conclusions at Roswell park in Colorado 
Springs about September 10th. — Denver Field and 
Farm. 

11 A vehicle wheel, supposed to be the oldest in exist- 
ence, is to be seen at the rooms of the New York His- 
torical Society. It was found in Egypt and is believed 
to have been made about four thousand years ago. 
Hub, spokes, felloes and all the essential features of the 
modern wheel are present in rudimentary form. 



Hambletonian Wilkes has another 2:20 trotter. Vic 
Shellar trotted to a record of 2:18} in the fourth heat 
of a race which he won at Davenport, Iowa, July 12th. 

Excursion rates have been secured on all the lines 
running out of Sacramento for the week of the Breed- 
ers meeting. The round trip rates will be one fare and 
a third. 

William G. Layng's pacer Sir Albert S. by Diablo, 
will probably be the favorite in the first race in which 
he start3. Jack Groom is showing two minute speed 
with him. 

Joe Thayer has given his Futurity candidate, Carrie 
Bel by Lynne Bel, slow work only since his arrival at 
Readville. The filly worked in 2:174 before leaving 
Kentucky. 

When The Charmer by Epaulet took a record of 
2:27} last week, he made the seventh of the get of 
Charm by Santa Claus, out of the sister to Trinket, to 
enter the list. Of these five are by Epaulet and foar 
are in the 2:20 list. 



The race won by Anaconda at Detroit last Wednes- 
day in which Coney paced the first heat in 2:02 and 
Anaconda tho next two in 2:02} and 2:034, is the fastest 
three heat race ever paced. Up to Wednesday the 
record had been held by Star Pointer who won a three 
heat race at Medford, Massachusetts, September 18, 
1896, in 2:02}, 2:034 and 2:03}. 

A bay four year old filly by Dictatus 2:17 that has 
just been broken and drives nicely is for sale. Also a 
small black mare, two years old, by Director 2:17. 
Both these mares are well bred on the dam's side and 
the four year old is a splendid prospect for some one to 
buy and train. The price has been placed very low in 
order to make a quick sale. Inquire at this office for 
particulars. 

Those $1000 purses to be decided at the Breeders 
meeting will result in great contests in several in- 
stances. One of the best posted horsemen in California 
who has seen many of the horses work says there will 
be more split heats this year than for some time past 
and that many hard fought races will be trotted and 
paced. The meeting will be worth attending from the 
first day until the last. 

"Trotwood" says that the horse trainers in Ten- 
nessee generally get about $25 per month for working 
a horse, but that the leading trainers get more. There 
are some trainers in California who handle horses for 
that sum, but the more horses they have the deeper 
they run in debt. A man cannot work a horse for $25 
a month and pay for sufficient feed for himself and the 
horse to say nothing of feeding the swipes. 



Horses have to step fast nowadays to win small 
purses in slow classes. At Pekin, 111., on the 2d inst., 
the time in the 2:35 pacing class, purse $500, was 2:20}, 
2:12}, 2:19} Four heats were contested in the 2:13 
class over the same track and on the same day for a 
purse of $500. The time in each heat was 2:144, 2:16}, 
2:16}, 2:16}. The time in the fastest heat of the 2:13 
class was 24 seconds slower than that in the 2:25 class. 
The fastest heat in the 2:16 trot, same day and track, 
was 2:20. or 7} seconds slower than the fastest heat in 
the 2:35 pace. 

Ecstacy won the Minneapolis trotting derby last 
week, trotting the three miles in 7:17}, within a second 
and a quarter of the world's race record for the dis- 
tance as made in the same stako six years ago by 
Fairywood. She is by Red Baron, dam Salome, by 
Bulletin. 



The avorago received for the fifty head of trotting 
bred horses sold in this city July 11th by the Oakwood 
Park Stock Farm was $i66.20 instead of $163.50, as 
stated in these columns last week. It was one of the 
best sales held in California in years, and not only 
pleasing to Mr. John F. Boyd, breeder of the horses, 
but also to the purchasers, who all are confident that 
they received full value for their money. 



Zombro has been bred to more mares since he reached 
Oregon than he was bred to altogether during the first 
three years his owner had him in the stud. While, 
therefore, there are not many colts sired by him over 
three years of age, the quality seems extra good and 
are already making the horse a reputation. Walter 
Maben worked a three year old filly by Zombro a mile 
in 2:16} at tho trot in Los Angeles two weeks ago. 



There is a two year old filly over in Illinois that is 
showing great speed at the pace. She started in a 
race for two year olds at Peoria, July 11th, and was 
asked to go three heats, something unusual for two 
year olds. She won so easily that the spectators said 
it was but a jog for her, and yet the time was 2:17}, 
2:254 and 2:21. Her name is Miss McClintock and her 
sire is Ashland Wilkes, sire of John R. Gentry 2:004. 



Geo. H. Ketcham desires to start Cresceus 2:04 in the 
amateur contest for the $1000 Boston cup over the 
Cleveland track. Under the conditions named by the 
Boston Club, Mr. Ketcham claims that Cresceus is 
eligible to start. Mr. Ketcham is a member of the 
Toledo Driving Club, and although he cannot be allowed 
to drive Cresceus in an amateur contest, he has selected 
a member of the Toledo Club, a real amateur, to drive 
in the event. 



Geo. W. Bixby, a prominent hotel keeper and a well 
known horseman of Boston, died recently of heart 
disease at his home in Roxbury, Mass., aged 50 years. 
Many of the most prominent horses owned in Boston 
were the property of Mr. Bixby, or passed through 
his hands to Boston horsemen, and became well known 
on the track and road. Altogether he had owned at 
various times 50 horses with marks better than 2:28, 
20 of them being better than 2:20, among the better 
known were: Adonis 2:11}, Tuna 2:124, Artful Maid 
2:13}, J. B. S. 2:16}, J. B. Richardson 2:104, Allie Gee 
2:164, and Iona S. 2:17}. 



Emma M. 2:12}, that will meet Lolita 2:12} in a 
match race at the Cleveland Grand Circuit meeting, 
recently worked out in 2:11$ or 1} seconds better than 
her record. 

Howland Russell, of Boston, has wagered $1000 with 
George Van Dyke, of the same city, that his mare 
Mazette 2:07} will win a faster heat this year than 
Frank Bogash 2:03}. 

Wm. McFarland, the Philadelphia horseman, offers 
to bet that he has five two year olds which can beat 
any other five of the same age over any track in any 
part of the country. 

Last Saturday afternoon, July 16th, lightning killed 
the famous stallion Mahogany 2:12}, at Goshen, N. J. 
He was owned by Guy Miller, Chester. 'A valuable 
colt by Electioneer was also killed. 



While carriage builders generally are disposed to 
frown on the pneumatic tire and small wheel for road 
wagons, horsemen who drive trotters are almost 
unanimous in the opinion that for speeding purposes a 
pneumatic wagon is seconds faster than the old style 
high wheel vehicle. 

At Windsor, on July 11th, when Billy H. beat Stan- 
ton Wilkes and a field of several other good ones, the 
Nutwood Wilkes gelding paced a remarkable race for 
a green horse. He paced the first heat in 2:10}, and 
was beaten a short nose by Billy H. in the next heat 
in 2:10}. It was the opinion of many that the driver 
of Billy H. laid up the first heat, as the horse showed 
the ability to pace better than 2:10 in a workout two 
days before the race. 

Humboldt Maid started for the first time this year 
at Peoria, 111., July 10th in the 2:14 trot. She was 
2-4-3-2 and took third money. The best time made in 
the race was 2:164. The judges fined Creasy, the 
driver of Huxam for interfering with Benson, driver 
of Humboldt Maid, and it is evident that the little 
daughter of Waldstein would have won one or more 
heats had there not been collusion to prevent her beat- 
ing Gold Standard, the winner. 



At Pekin, 111, Will Durfee had the mare Queen R. 
entered in the 2:13 pace. In three of the five heats of 
the race Durfee had finished third with her and in the 
fourth heat she finished second, but kept breaking and 
acting badly, although the mile was as slow as 2:18. 
After the fourth heat Durfee complained to Secretary 
Jones that his mare was acting very badly, and in a 
joking way remarked, "I guess I'll let you drive her 
in the next heat." Jones was dressed in a Prince 
Albert and wore a silk tile, but he cheerfully accepted 
the banter, exchanged his high hat for Durfee's cap 
and drove Queen K. the fifth heat. He made a good 
drive but could not land her better than fourth. 

The fast Colorado pacer, Winfield Stratton 2:15, has 
been leased by his owner, Walter Wood of Denver, to 
Bob Smith, a Pennsylvanian who has for some time 
been in Colorado for his health and likes harness 
horses. Mr. Smith will take the pacer, as well as the 
good trotting mare Vendora 2:18}, which he recently 
purchased from Kansas parties, on through the Great 
Western circuit. Mr. Smith, though an amateur, has 
boen driving and training at the Overland Park course 
just enough for pleasure to develop into quite a clever 
reinsman, and will drive the horses himself in their 
future engagements. Both showed good enough dur- 
ing the Denver meeting to make them look like prob- 
able good winners. 



S. R. Leach of Enid, O. T., has a horse with a his- 
tory. It is a common cow pony, and Mr. Leach bought 
the animal 26 years ago, when it was six years old. 
The purchase was made in the southern part of New 
Mexico, the consideration being $3. The animal had 
been stolen, however, and the rightful owner appear- 
ing Mr. Leach settled with him for $5, making the 
total cost of the horse $8. Mr. Leach rode the animal 
to Cincinnati, and has used him for a saddle horse ever 
since. The horse has worn out a number of saddles, 
and only recently a new one was received, made especi- 
ally for him. The horse is now 32 years old, and is 
still a pretty good saddle horse, and his owner would 
not part with him for any consideration. 

C. A. Durfee had his eyes fixed on two green mares 
by McKinney that he considered good enough for 
Grand Circuit material and mentioned their names 
recently to a millionaire friend of his, who asked what 
they could be purchased for. "It will take big money," 
said Durfee, "up in the thousands." "Go and buy 
them, "said the moneyed man, and Durfee with visions 
of first money in the M. & M .. the Transylvania and 
other great stakes before him tried to get the owners 
of the mares to set a price on them, but the answers 
received were almost identical — the mares were not for 
sale. Durfee says that while he was greatly disap- 
pointed in failing to get these mares, his head swelled 
quite perceptibly when he realized that the McKinneys 
are getting so good that they are not for sale at any 
price, and that he will wear an india rubber hat from 
now on. 

In J. P. Adams' collection of horseshoes at the Cleve- 
land track are many interesting curios. There is one 
of the shoes worn by Star Pointer when he reduced 
his mark to two minutes at Hartford, Conn., August 
31, 1899. Another was worn by Prince Alert when he 
paced a mile in 2:02 over theCleveland track, establish- 
ing the track record for pacers. Then there is a 
Morocco donkey shoe loaned Mr. Adams by Mr. J. B. 
Perkins. A Spanish horseshoe also owned by Mr. 
Perkins is an odd looking affair. It is very heavy, 
with largo square holes and large square-headed nails. 
The toe is turned up, giving a rocker-like appearance. 
An Arabian shoe, the property of Mr. H. M. Case, 
shows that the Arabians have not learned anything of 
the art of shoeing in the last 300 years, as it possesses 
huge bolt-like nails, and has a narrow closed heel, the 
toe and the heel tipping up. Altogether, Mr. Adams 
has about 300 shoes in his collection, no two of which 
are alike. 



JULY 20, 1901] 



1 



| THE SADDLE. $ 

The Horses. 



Climb the ladder to the loft, lad and throw down plenty hay, 
And pour into the mangers deep the golden ears of corn, 
For Bill and Pete and Moll and Febe have been toiling hard all day 
Since first the early sunbeams kissed the blushing face of morn. 
Their heaving flanks were white with foam, and thro' their nostrils 
wide 

Their heated breath poured forth assteam in many a rushing tide, 

Dear Bill and Pete, dear Moll and Febe! I wish that you could know 

How well I love you in my heart and how it pains me so 

To see you drag the heavy plow and weary thro' the mud, 

To make for me the water ditch before another Hood. 

But all my farm is low and flat, and tho' the soil is rich. 

I cannot make much corn for you unless you plow the ditch. 

The day's been one of gloom and dark; just once I saw the sun. 
It seemed the clouds would drop their flood before the ditch was 
done, 

And once I thought to rest awhile beneath the dogwood tree, 
But all its blooms were drooping low, and wet as they could be, 
Along the branch the killdeer cried with many a bob and twist, 
The old crow, hoarse vrfth too much gab, went croaking thro' the 
mist. 

And now, good lad, make their beds soft with plenty of that straw; 
The wind blows chilly thro' the barn, the air is damp and raw. 
While all night long the whipperwill from her green covert calls. 
Content they'll munch their fragrant hay and rest in bedded stalls- 
Come here, old Pete, and let me rub and hug your glossy neck, 
As soft as velvet to the touch, without a stain or fleck. 

Your flossy mane is fine as silk, your eyes a lovely blue; 
And you're so gentle and so kind that I'm in love with you. 
If horses have immortal souls— and they must have, I know- 
Then when their work on earth is done, to Paradise will go. 
I hope myself some time to reach that country bright and fair, 
But heaven, I feel, won't be complete unless I find you there. 

—Everett Maxwell in Oregon Statesman. 



The Art of "Broncho Busting." 

[H. A. C. in Breeders Gazette.] 

The broncho is probably tho most vicious of the 
equine race. He sprang from the Mexican mustang, 
and was bred largely in Texas for use on the cattle 
ranges. When the cattle business in the North grew 
to such enormous proportions, the broncho was driven 
thither in large herds and sold from $25 to $40 per 
head for cow ponies. Finally they were raised in the 
North, being used principally as saddle horses, but in 
many instances for general purposes. A pair of bron- 
chos hitched to a light vehicle will easily make one 
hundred miles over the roads and trails of the Rocky 
Mountain region in a day. Gradually the broncho has 
been bred up with the American horse, which has in- 
creased his size and softened his temper. Still, the 
broncho is much in evidence yet all over the great 
cattle ranges, and the "broncho buster" is still a feat- 
ure of Western life. Formerly the broncho was about 
the only horse seen on the round-up, but now he is ono 
of two classes in use in that field of action. "Circle 
work" — that is, the work of gathering the cattle in — 
is now performed with a larger saddle horse than the 
broncho, the latter being used as "cut-out" horses. 
The "cut-out" is the selecting and separating of cer- 
tain animals from the general herd, for branding pur- 
poses or for beef, and for this purpose the broncho is 
preferred on account of its greater nimbleness. 

Every cowboy who follows the round-up must of 
necessity be more or less of a "broncho buster," for 
when the round-up starts out, each cowboy is given 
from eight to eighteen head of bronchos to ride the 
range with. Some of them are bound to be badly 
broken, while others are chronic degenerates, and will 
buck whenever inclination moves them. So the cow- 
boy, if he has any "sand," takes his bunch of bronchos 
as he finds them, and in turn rides them one and all. 
even though he is obliged to try conclusions with more 
than one of them. But, again, there is the pro- 
fessional "broncho buster," who makes a regular busi- 
ness of it. He may be employed on a single ranch 
where a large number of bronchos are either in use or 
bred for sale. Here he is paid about $15 per month. 
Or he maybe an itinerant "buster, " traveling from 
place to place breaking bronchos at so much per head, 
or so much for the bunch. These men naturally bo- 
come very expert, and fear nothing in the shape of a 
horse. Some of the most daring broncho busters have 
been colored men. There was Broncho Jim, who used 
to operate in Colorado and Wyoming. For a dollar, 
and a few drinks of whiskey, he would mount the wild- 
est broncho without saddle or bridlo and always come 
out victor. He simply "froze" to the animal until the 
latter had to give up from sheer exhaustion. A favor- 
ite trick of his was to mount the crosspiece of an old- 
fashioned farm gate, and then, as a herd of bronchos 
were driven through the gate, drop upon the back of 
the first animal he had a mind to choose. Of course, 
the animal would be maddened by fright, which, 
coupled with its natural viciousness, would cause it to 
make a frantic effort to rid itself of its rider. It might 



be a headlong bolt out upon the plains, or it might be 
a double and twisted exhibition of bucking, but not an 
inch would the plucky negro budge. 

In breaking a broncho the first thing to do is to cut 
him out of the herd, lasso, throw and rope him. Then 
he is saddled and bridled. As his captors loosen the 
ropes, the "broncho buster" bestrides the saddle and 
is lifted as the animal rises to its feet. Then the fun 
begins. Besides bucking, the vicious brute bites, 
strikes and kicks, shaking his head furiously. His 
ducking is a variety performance in itself. He bucks 
sidewise, forwards, backwards and perpendicularly. 
In the [last-named performance, he gathers his four 
feet into as narrow a compass as possible, humps up 
his back, lowers his head and lifts himself heavenward. 
This is all well enough. It is when he returns to earth 
that the damage is likely to be done; for he comes in 
such violent collision with the mundane sphere that 
the shock is very liable to displace the vital parts of 
his rider. The latter simply raises himself in his 
stirrups and saves himsolf by the elastic action of the 
knees. But many a one has been caught unawares 
and had the daylight jarred out of him. There was 
Joe Sullivan, one of the early Wyoming cowboys, as 
plucky a man as ever lived, and an Indian fighter and 
an all around plainsman, who would never give in to 
the worst broncho you ever saw. They got hold of 
the meanest broncho on record. Nobody could handle 
him, until one day Joe took the job, and then it was a 
fight to the death. For fully an hour man and beast 
were in deadly conflict, but the man did not give up 
until the beast was dead, and then his comrades knew 
by the look on the man's face that it was an even 
thing. They sent for the post surgeon down at Fort 
Laramie, but Joe was 'dead before the man of science 
arrived. Internal hemorrhage had intervened, and 
there was no more broncho-busting for Joe. 

The broncho buster is always armed with a pair of 
heavy spurs and a "quirt." The latter is a short whip 
with a heavy handle. With both heels he plies the 
spurs to the animal's flanks until the blood comes, and 
belabors him over the head, neck and sides with the 
"quirt." He always pulls hard on the bridle reins in 
order to keep the horse's head up, for the animal can 
bu3k much harder if he can get his head down between 
his front feet. If there is any brush or timber nearby, 
the broncho always makes a break for it in order to 
rid himself of his tenacious burden by rubbing him off 
against a tree or an over-arching limb. Then the 
broncho buster is obliged to lay himself as near the 
pony's back or side as he can get in order not to be 
brained against a limb or crushed against the trunk of 
some tree. Then the broncho has a trick of rearing 
up on his hind feet and falling over backward on top 
of his rider. Then the rider's only safety is in slipping 
from the saddle and landing on his feet before the 
horse reaches the ground. Then the broncho has an- 
other trick of suddenly laying down and attempting to 
roll over upon and thus crush his rider; but the expert 
broncho buster merely slips around on the upper side 
of the animal and comes down on top. Then the 
broncho is no sooner upon his feet again than the rider 
is in the saddle and ready for business. 

One of the most important things in bronco busting 
is to get a good "cinch" on the saddle. The "cinch" 
would be known in common parlance as a belly girth. 
But the cowboy on the pony has two "cinches" — the 
body "cinch" and the belly "cinch." Each consists of 
a band fully six inches in width, composed of leather, 
and strands of hempen cord. Back and front the 
"cinches" are drawn as tightly as a strong man can 
pull them by bracing his foot against the animal's side 
and pulling with all his might. At each pull the 
broncho lays back his ears, and the air is very likely 
to be presently full of flying heels. The Mexican bit, 
with a high port and a tremendous leverage, is com- 
monly used in busting bronchos, and if the animal in 
hand is inclined to be unruly pressure is brought to 
bear upon the bit until blood flows copiously from his 
mouth. 

One flash of lightning cost John E. Madden, the 
horseman, $10,000 July 13th. It struck his barn, near 
the Shoepshead Bay track, where Moondyne, tho bay 
yearling colt by Hamburg-imp. Mintcake, was quar- 
tered and killed him instantly. Moondyne was the 
"star" yearling of tho late Marcus Daly's sale at 
Madison Square Garden in May. He was eagerly 
sought by soveral horsemen, but Madden outbid them 
all and secured him for $10,000. Milos Finlan, the 
owner of Lucky Star, a wealthy mine ownor and an 
old friend of Marcus Daly, bid against Madden for 
Moondyne. He started him at $2500 and contested 
Maddon's $500 raises until $0500 was reached. When 
$10,000 was bid Mr. Finlan took his hat off to Madden 
and retired. At tho salo it was rumored that W. C. 
Whitney was to bo a half owner of Moondyne, but 
Madden denied this and paid for tho colt with his own 
check. Moondyne was a typical Hamburg in minia- 
ture. He looked like his sire and had his conformation. 
It was too early in tho season to ask any fast trials of 
him, but he gave every indication of fast speed, and 
Madden intended to enter him heavily in all the valu- 
able stakes. 



Results at Butte. 



July 12. Six furlongs— Sea Song won, Spindel sec- 
ond. Bill Bohmanson third. Time 1:15). 

Three and a half furlongs — Jack won, Abba I. 
second, Don H. third. Time 0:41\. 

Six furlongs — Rainier won, Yule second, Sam Green 
third. Timel:15|. 

One mile — Burdock won, The Butcher second, 
Flamero third. Time 1:43. 

Four and a half furlongs — F. M. Brattain won, 
Dandy second, Shell Mount third. Time 0:55L 

One mile and a quarter, over five hurdles — Auriffera 
won, Odd Eyes second, Gold Dust third. Time 2:20. 

July 13. Four furlongs — Spindle won, Undergrowth 
second, Bill Bohmanson third. Time 0:49J. 

Six furlongs — Sweet Corporal won, High Hoe second, 
Duckoy third. Time 1:15*. 

One mile and seventy yards — Gauntlet won, Juliette 
B. second, Donator third. Time 1:50£. 

One inile — Ada N. won, Hagerdon second, Algaretta 
third. Time 1:43}. 

Five furlongs — Adnor won, Alary's Garter second, 
Sir Dougall third. Time 1:04. 

One mile — Ting-a-Ling won, Old Fox second, Cousin 
Letty third. Time 1:46. 

July 15. Four furlongs — Floculver won, Grace Tho- 
burn second, Addie D. third. Time 0:49i{. 

Seven furlongs — Free Pass won, Monus second, 
Alaria third. Time 1:28}. 

One mile and seventy yards — The Butcher won, 
Senator Dubois second, Old Fox third. Time 1:45L 
1 One mile — Kenovawon, St. Germaine second, Linden 
Ella third. Time 1:43}. 

Six furlongs — Espirando won, George H. Ketchum 
second, Rio Chico third. Time 1:14£. 

Three and a half furlongs — Midlove won, Jack 
second, Henry R. third. Time 0:42. 

July 16 — 2:17 class pace — Jim Dixon won, Hassalo 
second, George Wakefield third. Best time 2:13J by 
Wakefield. 

Five and one-half furlongs— William F. won, Ned 
Dennis second, Monda third. Time 1:094. 

One mile — Sisquoc won, Spindle second, Cousin 
Letty third. Time 1:43 J. 

Five and one-half furlongs — De Capo won, True Blue 
second, Valencienne third. Time 1:08J. 

Four furlongs — Graham Green won, Parazaide 
second, Pirate Maid third. Time 0:47}. 

One mile and one-eighth, over four hurdles — Odd 
Eyes won, Gold Dust second, Delgado third. Time 
2:02. 

July 17. Six furlongs — M. L. Rothschild won. Un- 
dergrowth second, Joe K. third. Time, 1:16}. 

Five furlongs — Don H. won, Ned Dennis second, 
Cushion third. Time, 1:01}. 

Four furlongs — Cayenne Pepper won, Pirate Maid 
second, Winnecook third. Time, 0:49J. 

One mile — Donator won, Rio Chico second, Linden 
Ella third. Time, 1:43£. 

Six furlongs — Monda won, Yule second, Distance 
third. Time, 1:15. 

Five furlongs — Barney F. won, Amaza second, Abba 
L. third. Time, 1:02L 



Saddle Notes. 



Several owners of jumping horses that are over East 
at the present time, have made inquiry of the 
Breeder and Sportsman as to whether the Cali- 
fornia Jockey Club will give any purses for jumpers at 
its meeting next winter. While nothing definite has 
been announced yet, it is very probable that the C. J. C. 
will keep to its rule of refusing to make any provision 
for this class of horses. 

Earl Linnell, the well known horseman of this State, 
is now at Chicago with a string of six horses in train- 
ing. In his stable are the two well known horses 
Olinthus and Negligence owned by J. J. Moore, and 
he is also training the horses Viking, Alaska, Mc- 
Caffrey and What'er Lou, belonging to A. M. Linnell 
& Co. He states in a recent letter that all the horses 
are doing well except Olinthus, who pulled up very 
lame recently, but that up to that time the son of Red 
Iron and Lilly Wright could give any jumper in Chi- 
cago 20 pounds and a beating. 



Horse < iwners Should USO 
OOMBAULT'S 

Caustic 
Balsam 

The Great French Veterinary Remedy. 

A SAFE, SPEEDY AND 
POSITIVE CURE. 




SUPERSEDES ALL CAUTERY OP FIRINO 

Impossible to product anv scar or blemish. The 
safest best Blister ever used. Tiikes tho place 
of all linimontx for mild or sovure wtion. Remove! 
nil Bunches or l-l.-riti Ij. . from Hurses or Cattle. 

As n HUMAN REMEDY for Rheumatism, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, Etc, it is invaluable. 
HfC OlllDHUTrC that one tablesponnful ol 

ffft uUAnAN I Lt caustic balsam win 

produce more actual rosults than a whole bottle ot 
any liniment or spavin cure r ixture ever made. 

Every bottle of Caustic L.alnam soldisWarran 
ted to give satisfaction. Price 8 1 .BO per bottle. Sold 
j>y d ruHKists. or sent by expresr, charues paid, with f ul' 
directions for iU.use. Send for descriptive circular* 
testimonials, etc' Address 

fHELAWBENOE-WILLIAMS CO.. Cleveland. Onto 



8 



[July 20, 190 1 



ROD. 




Coming Events. 

July 1— Striped bass season opened. 
July 1— Black bass season opened. 

July 27— Saturday Contest No. 8. Class series. Stow lake 
2:30 P. M. 

July 28— Sunday Contest No 8. Class series. Stow lake, 10 A. M 



Methods for Catching Big Trout. 

Lake fishing is treated by H. P. Wells in his Fly- 
Rods and Fly-Tackle in the following manner whilst 
describing his experience on the royal Maine trouting 
waters: 

During tho first of a companionship, in which some 
of the happiest moments of my life have since been 
passed, I was fishing in tho Kangeley lakes under the 
tutelage of that well known guide, John S. Dan forth. 
I asked him: "John, who catches the most big fish of 
any of the sportsmen who come here?" He replied 

that a Mr. S of Boston was the most successful in 

that respect. I asked him how he handled his flies, 
and made him show me, rod in hand. But a single fly 
was used, and that large — one tied on a No. 2 Harrison 
Sproat hook is none too big. The fly was cast fair and 
straight, allowed to sink six inches or even a foot 
where it fell, then it was moved very slowly three or 
four feet, then followed quite a pause, when it was 
again put in motion, drawn slowly to within convenient 
distance for the back cast, and taken quietly and 
smoothly from the water. The main points were to 
keep the fly below rather than on the surface, and to 
move it slowly. Better fortune at once attended the 
adoption of this system, especially in the size of the 
fish taken. 

Those having the best opportunities of observation 
think that in that region the largo fish are not surface 
feeders, at least on insects. Of course, every one has 
seen them, when in the twilight the lakes are unrippled 
by a breeze, and the slightest dimple of the mirror-like 
water is conspicuous — everyone has then seen large 
trout dash from underneath through a school of min- 
nows play'ng on the surface. For large trout to roll 
up during the month of September is also of frequent 
occurrence. But I believe no one has yet fathomed 
the cause of this. The most careful observations fail 
to show that any food is then taken; and, as I have 
said before, it is by some regarded as an unfavorable 
indication, as far as successful fishing is concerned. 
But I have no recollection, in ten quite protracted fish- 
ing excursions to those waters, ever having seen a 
trout of over two pounds tako a natural fly at all, nor 
have I ever seen a trout of over four pounds ever take 
the artificial fly, or even a bait on the surface of the 
water. It may happen, but it is certainly by no means 
common. Small fish up to two, or even two and a half 
pounds, may readily be enticed to take a fly manipu- 
lated in the usual manner; but if the larger fish are 
desired, and a surfeit of the smaller are soon had, a 
large fly must be used, and it must be moved slowly, 
and somewhat below the surface, the deeper the better. 

Locate your boat first, if you fish from a boat, as is 
there usual, passing over barren water if possible, and 
as slowly and noiselessly as though paddling up on a 
deer; or, if your stand is ashore, take your stand. 
Then allow some minutes to elapse that any alarm oc- 
casioned by your approach may subside, after which 
begin. Start at about thirty or thirty-five feet, and 
cast around your position, directing the fly at each 
cast about six feet to one side of where it last fell, and 
so cover the water like the rays of a fan. When one 
circuit has been completed without a rise, lengthen 
out about six feet, and, beginning at the same starting 
point, repeat. Continue this until you have all the 
line out you can cast perfectly straight every time,and 
do not go a single foot beyond. 

Should, however, a distant rise be seen, yet within 
reach, go for it, but in the following mannor: Lengthen 
the line in the usual way, but without allowing the fly 
to touch the water When enough line to reach is out 
let the fly settle, and, elevating the point of tho rod 
well, reel slowly in. To retrieve the line by tho oack 
cast well be impossible, if tho fly is left long enough in 
the water to tempt the fish. I repeat, in this fishing 
more than any other, it is indispensable to success that 
the line fall absolutely straight. The fish will not hook 
itself, nor will it afford time to gather slack line before 
it rejects the fly. 

Nor should discouragement follow because success is 
deferred. In the month of September, as far as I have 
been able to observe, these large trout are in almost 
constant motion, slowly cruising about some fixed 
locality which they have selected for their spawning 
bed. For an hour or more not a single fish may be 
within reach, yet the next ten minutes a dozen may 
have approached. 

After having been in position for an hour or so, if in 
a boat and moderate quiet has been preserved — that is, 
if there has been no concussion upon its sides or bottom 
— reeltn short and try close to tb.0 boat, particularly 
on the shady side. Here let your fry sink pretty well, 
and draw it slowly to the surface, for the fish love the 
shade and are apt to settle there. 

The foregoing is the only method by which I have 
ever known a fish of over four pounds' weight to be 
taken with the fly. Occasionally one may rise at and 
take a fly on the surface, but I have never known or 
even heard of such a case. I have heard not in- 
frequently of such rising to the fly of an angler who 
habitually fished by drawing his flies over the water in 
the usual manner; but on investigation it has invariably 



appeared that the rise took place after he had become 
discouraged, or when his attention was elsewhere, and 
that at tho time his flies were lying idle and were sub- 
merged. 

I strongly prefer one fly for this fishing to a larger 
number. When first struck these large fish seem utterly 
uncontrollable by any tackle such as anglers use. Not 
that they move so rapidly, for their motions are even 
then, when life itself is at stake, rather deliberate; 
but there is a power in them that seems irresistible. 
If any obstruction is near, how heartily does the angler 
then wish he was rid of that second fly. Besides, these 
large flies are difficult to retrieve, if they are allowed 
to sink as they should; and if the resistance of a second 
is added to that of the first, the range of the cast is 
considerably diminished. Still there are times when a 
second fly does good service. It is not uncommon to 
take a smaller fish on one fly, and for him to tow 
the other through the water, and thus tempt and actu- 
ally fasten a much larger fish. It is not very sports- 
manlike, but when large trout aro known to be within 
sight of the fly, and they stubbornly refuse to be 
tempted, this has been tried with success. 

What flies take best in those waters? There is i 
wide divergence of opinion as to this; still I will give 
my own for what it is worth. 

My first favorite is the "Parmacheene Bolle." Per- 
haps I am too partial to this fly, since it is, in a meas- 
ure, my own child. John and I seldom fish between 
half-past eleven and four o'clock That interval is 
passed prowling about the woods, or shooting at a 
mark with a rifle, or in some other similar way. Often 
the fly-tying box is produced, and the word is, "Well, 
John, what shall we tease them with this afternoon? *' 
Thus, on joint suggestion, very many difficult com- 
binations have been tried, and so over twenty years 
ago was the "Parmacheene Belle" born. It was a suc- 
cess, and since then I have used it four-fifths of the 
time when fishing the headwaters of the Androscoggin 
river. The body is lemon yellow mohair, wrapped 
with silver tinsel; tail two to four strands of white and 
scarlet; hackle white and scarlet (I have sometimes 
wound both hackles on at the same time, and some- 
times the white first and the scarlet afterward, and 
over the white, capping it as it were: the latter is the 
better); wings white, striped with scarlet, the white 
decidedly predominating. 

Place the whole catalogue of known flies on the one 
hand, and this single fly on the other, and force me to 
choose and confine myself to that choice, and for fish- 
ing in those waters, I would choose the "Parmacheene 
Belle" every time. I have tried it in sunshine and 
rain, at noonday and in the gloaming, and at all times 
it has proved successful. 

June and September are the best months for fly- 
fishing, the large fish being taken at othor times only 
by deep trolling, or still-fishing with bait in deep water. 
Fly-fishing is not commonly practiced in June, but 
judging from a single experience in 1883, I think this 
a mistake. 

Stow Lake Fly Casting. 

The fly-casting at Stow lake last Saturday and Sun- 
day was(of an excellent order of skill. In fact, in one 
event Sunday, the record made by C. R. Kenniff— a 
new member and faithful and industrious worker — is 
the best score ever made at the club contests here, and 
is but a little behind the best Eastern showing. The 
work in long distance casting on Sunday is also worthy 
of attention. The cast of Mr. Golcher, 132 feet, is but 
eighteen inches behind the champion record of Walter 
D. Mansfield. Messrs. Brotherton, Everett, Daver- 
kosen, Grant and Boswell Kenniff all scored their best 
casts for the season on Sunday. Taken as a whole the 
work for both days is of a high order, the delicacy 
records for Saturday being particularly good. The 
records are given in detail below. 

Saturday Contest No 7— Stow Lake, July 13, 1901. Wind, 
northwest. Weather, warm and clear. 

Judges— Messrs. Mansfield and Everett. Referee, Mr. Muller. 
Clerk, Mr. Young. 



1 KENNEL. 



Events 



l 



Battu, H 89 

Brooks, W. E 91 

Everett, E 118 

Grant, C. F 106 1 

Mansfield, W. D... . 

Muller, H. P 99 

Mocker, E. A 

Young, C. G 94 



89 




1)1 




77 


6-12 


84 3-12 




91 




88 


8-12 


74 




79 4-12 




91 


4-13 


89 


8-12 


77 


6-12 


83 7-12 




89 


8-12 


90 




74 


2-12 


82 1-12 




94 




92 


8-12 


77 


6-12 


85 1-12 




94 




92 




74 


2-12 


83 1-12 








91 


8-12 


74 


2-12 


82 11-12 




1 92 


4-12 


92 


8-12 


78 


8-12 


84 8-12 





Sunday Contest No. 7— Stow Lake, July 11, 1901. Wind, 
west. Weather, perfect. 

Judges— Messrs. Mocker and Muller. Referee, Mr.lBrotherton. 
Clerk, Mr. Young. 



Events 



1 



Battu. H 97 

Brooks, W. E 108 

Brotherton, T. W. .121 
Davurkosen, F. E. .115 1-2 

Everett, E 116 

Grant, C. F 114 

Golcher, H. C 132 

Haight, F. M 84 

Huyck, C 98 

Isenbruck, R 76 

Kenniff, J. B.. 110 

Kenniff, C. R 101 

Mansfield. W. D.. 

Mocker, E. A 95 

Muller, H. F 
Young, C. G 



90 4-12 

83 8-12 
92 

85 8-12 

11.3 4 -12 

84 8-12 

89 4-12 
88 

90 8-12 




84 

88 8-12 
86 4-12 



87 4-12 
89 8-12 
78 8-12 
8-12 



81 

81 

87 

93 8-12 

88 8-12 

86 4-12 

90 8-12 



73 4-12 

72 6-12 
75 

80 

76 8-12 
75 

78 4-12 

73 4-12 

77 6-12 

74 2-12 
72 6-12 
80 

77 6-12 

75 10-12 
74 2-12 



78 8-12 
80- 7-12 

80 8-12 
84 

82 10-12 

81 2-12 
84 

76 

79 7-12 

77 7-12 

79 7-12 

86 10-12 

63 1-12 

81 1-12 

82 5-12 



665 
94 5 



953 
97' 



«S»NOTE: Event I— Distance Casting, feet. Event 2— Ac- 
curacy, percentage. Event 3— Delicacy, (a) accuracy percentage; 
(b) delicacy percentage; (c) net percentage. Event 4— Lure cast- 
ing, percentage. 
The fractions in lure casting are 15ths. 

Some new wrinkles in striped bass fishing tackle 
manufactured by Al Wilson are in big demand and 
also a new lot of trout rods, reels, lines, flies and a full 
general line of up to date outing goods at the H. E. 
Skinner Co, 41b' Montgomery street. 



Coming Events. 

Aug. 20— Pacific Advisory Board. Monthly meeting. J. P 
Norman, Secretary. 

Bench Shows. 

Aug. 27, 28, 29, 30— Pan-American Exposition Dog Show, Buffalo, 
N. Y. E. M. Oldham, Superintendent. 

Sept. 2, 3, 4, 5— Toronto Industrial Exhibition. Eleventh annual 
Dog Show, Toronto, Can. W. P. Fraser, Secretary and Superin- 
tendent. 

Sept. 3, 4, 5, 6— Columbia County Agricultural Society. Inaug- 
ural Show, Chatham, N. Y. M. T. Mason, Secretary. 

Sept. 11, 12, 13, 14— West Virginia Exposition and State Fair 
Association. Annual Dog Show, Wheeling. W. Va. G. O. Smith, 
Manager. 

Sept. 19, 20, 21— Nanaimo Agricultural Association. Bench show 
Geo. Norris, Secretary, Nanaimo, B. C. P. K. L. Rules. 

Sept. 24, 25, 26, 27— Middlesex East Agricultural Association. 
Dog Show, Wakefield, Mass. G. B. Kirkpatrick, Secretary Bench 
Show Committee, Boston, Mass. 

Sept. 28-Oct. 12— District Agricultural Association. Los Angeles. 
Bench show. 

Oct. 8, 9, 10, 11— Texas Kennel Club Dog Show, Dallas, Texas. 
Sidney Smith, Secretary. 

Oct 8, 9, 10, 11— Danbury Agricultural Society. Dog Show, Dan- 
bury, Conn. James Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Nov. 27, 28, 29, 30— Philadelphia Dog Show«Association. 3rd an- 
nual show. Philadelphia, Pa. Marcel A. Viti. Secretary. 

Dec Oakland Poultry and Pet Stock Exhibit. Bench show. 

John Bradshaw, Superintendent. A K. C. Rules. 



Field Trials. 

Aug. 13— Iowa Field Trial Association. 4th annual trials. Km- 
metsburg, la. Louis Verveer, Secretary, Des Moines, la. 

Aug. 20— South Dakota Field Trial Association. 2d annual trials 
Sioux Falls, S. D. Olav Haugtro, Secretary, Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Aug. 27— Wisconsin State Field Trial Association. Inaugural 
trials. , Wis. O W. Gothke, Secretary. Centrolia, Wis. 

Sept. 2, 3— Western Canada Kennel Club. Annual trials. La 
Salle, Man. H H. Cooper, Secretary, Winnipeg, Man. 

Sept. 10— Manitoba Field Trials Club. 15th annual trials. Car- 
man, Man. Eric Hamber, Secretary-Treasurer, Winnipeg. Man. 

Oct. 14— Pacific Northwest Field Trial Club. 2d annual trials. 
Whidby island. F. K. Atkins, Secretary. Seattle, Wash. 

Oct. 29— Monongahela Game Association. 7th annual trials. 
Senecaville, O. A. C. Peterson. Secretary, Homestead, Pa. 

Nov. Michigan Field Trials Association. 4th annual trials. 

, Mich. C. D. Stuart, Secretary, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Nov. Ohio Field Trial Club. 4th annual trials. , Ohio. 

C. E. Baughn, Secretary, Washington Court House, O. 

Nov. II— Independent Field Trial Club. 3rd annual trials. , 

Out. W. B. Wells, Honorary Secretary, Chatham, Ont. 

Nov. 12— International Field Trial Club. 13th annual trials 
Chatham Ont. W. B. Wells, Honorary Secretary, Chatham, Ont' 

Nov. 12— Connecticut Field Trial Club. (Open to New England 
dogs), Hampton. Conn. F. M. Chapin, Secretary, Pine Meadow, 
Conn. 

Nov. 12— Kentucky Field Trial Club. 2nd annual trials. Glas- 
gow, Ky. Dr. F. W. Samuel. Secretary, Louisville, Ky. 

Nov. 19— North American Field Trial Club. Ruthven, Ont. 
Richard Bangham, Secretary, Windsor, Ont. 

Nov. 19— Illinois Field Trial Association. 3rd annual trials. 
Robinson, Ills. W. R. Green, Secretary-treasurer, Marshall, Ills, 

Nov. 20— Pointer Club of America. Annual trials : 

R E. Westlake, Secretary. 

Nov. 23 — Eastern Field Trial Club. 23rd annual trials. Newton 
N. C. S. C. Bradley, Secretary, Greenfield Hill, Conn. 

Doings in Dogdom. 

We know of some excellent Emin Pasha puppies 
that can be bought by anyone desirous of having a 
high bred Greyhound. 

A bench show will be held in Los Angeles under the 
auspices of District Agricultural Association No. 6. the 
dates for the fair and race meeting are from September 
28th to October 12th, thirteen days. D. J. Sinclair 
has been employed to manage the bench exhibit. 



The Pug dog has an interesting origin. He was at 
first imported from China and Japan, and came into 
fashion In the reign of William III. It is stated that 
the King believed his life to have been saved by a dog 
of the breed awakening him to his danger when a mur- 
derous attack was about to be made on the Prince. 



The California Cocker Club held a meeting on the 
evening of July 5th, W. C. Ralston presiding. Much 
important club business was transacted. The club 
will possibly undertake to arrange a system of tracing 
members' dogs when lost. The club will hereafter 
have a time limit for new members joining just prior 
to a bench show. The Executive Committee will 
specify and report upon the eligibility of new members 
in competition for club prizes. The club has placed 
itself on record as in favor of Chas. H. Mason for judge 
of Cockers at the Oakland show. As local Judges only 
will be selected a preference for F. E. Miller and H. H. 
Carlton is expressed. 

A press colleague, over a show lunch, told us a good 
tale of a show of other days, says The Stock-Keeper. 
He was invited to judge, and upon reaching the town- 
let he was met at the station by a member of the com- 
mittee, who took possession of him, conducted him to 
a hotel, and there locked him up in a room with the 
other judge. This precaution, we learned, was taken 
to prevent exhibitors from approaching the judges 
and endeavoring to suborn them. After being incar- 
cerated like a troublesome jury the judges were mar- 
shalled into a procession composed of the executive, 
and, preceded by the village band, they all marched 
to the show ground. By the side of our judge walked 
the member of the committee who had been acting as 
his jailer, and who now profited by the opportunity to 
slip into the hand of the judge the number of his (the 
jailer's) own exhibit. Our friend was so struck with 
the compromising innocence of the act that he pur- 
posely forgot the hint when the dog appeared before 
him. 

Without doubt the British Bulldog is having a great 
time just now, says The Field, and never in the whole 
course of his career has he been so popular and bo 
numerous in his various forms. He is not quite the 
one-sided animal he was in earlier days; the Boston 



July 20, 1901] 



9 



Terrier, an American product, if not a Bulldog', is 
nearly so, and we have the so-called Toy Bulldog-. An 
endeavor is being made to keep the French Bulldog 
distinct from him, and there is, of course, our notable 
national dog, which two or three years ago seemed to 
be degenerating into an imbecile nondescript with legs 
and muscles so inordinately weak as to be unable to 
support the carcase and the head, which had been 
produced to the extreme of exaggeration. Certain 
members of the British Bulldog Club, and one or two 
critical admirers of the dog as he ought to be, bear the 
credit of smothering most of the cripples; we regret 
we cannot say all of them. However, things Bulldog 
way are better than they were, but it is not likely the 
establishment of a club for French Bulldogs in contra- 
distinction to that for Toy Bulldogs will be of any 
benefit, especially as the first named as a sine qua non 
persists in the doctrine of erect ears, and erect ears 
only. No well-regulated Bulldog ought to have these 
stiff, upright aural appendages, but to put an animal 
out of court altogether for ar certain point of this kind 
is where fanciers overreach themselves and make such 
a greivous error. A good and perfect animal ought to 
be so all round, without any one feature exaggerated 
at the expense of another. Malformed heads and 
chests and shoulders nearly killed the Bulldog, and 
now we have admirers of the same race making a cru- 
sade against what are called " button ears." Why a 
Bulldog has not as much right to have a "button " or 
drop ear as a Fox Terrier no one can understand. 

His Majesty King Edward VII has consented to con- 
tinue to be a patron of the International Kennel Club. 



n GUN 



bitch, Indiana, June 3, 1900; E. J. G. Daeubler, owner. 

George D. Dewey ( ); liver and white 

dog, Marsh 7, 1900; W. C. Donaldson, owner. 



Kennel Registry. 

WHELPS. 

G J. M. E. d'Aquin's Fox Terrier bitch Aldon Kitty (Von Voit- 
Dusky Pearl), whelped July 17. 1901, four puppies (2 dogs) to same 
owners Aldon Artist (Wawaset Actor-Ch. Aldon Radiance.) 

SALES. 

Qabllan Kennels (Hollister) sold the black Cocker bitch Gabilan 
Belle (Black Trophy-Stella Silk, to J. Dorian, July 15, 1901. 

Qabllan Kennels sold the black Cocker bitch Gabilan Fairy 
(Black Trophy-Stella Silk) to C. G. Jefferson. 

Gabilan Kennels sold the black Cocker dog Trophy Jr. (Black 
Trophy-Stella Silk) to John Dottinger. 





North American Field Trials Derby Entries. 

Thirty nominations — two Pointers and twenty-eight 
Setters comprise the list of Derby entries for the North 
American Field Trials, to be run at Ruthven, Ont., 
commencing November 19th. 

Topsy Clare (Count Danstone- Woodbine Belle), 
black, white and tan bitch, March 19, 1900; Geo. Daw- 
son, owner. 

Lou Rodfield (Rod field-Gipsy A. Gladstone), liver 
and white bitch, April 18, 1900; C. H. Haller, owner. 

Little Casino (Lady's Count Gladstone-Queen of 
Diamonds), black, white and tan bitch, June 20, 1900; 
L. Hilsendegen, owner. 

Rod's Pride III. (Cincinnatus Pride-Ruth T. Etol), 
blue belton dog, March 10, 1900; M. W. Tanner, owner. 

Count Dan (Count Danstone-Woodbine Belle), black, 
white and tan dog, March 19, 1900; L. J. Meade, owner. 

Jennie Bane (Donald Bane-Lady Vassar II.), white 
and orange bitch, March 20, 1900; John Davidson, 
owner. 

Cyclone (Lady's Count Gladstone-Lady Brady), 
orange and white dog, August 2, 1900; J. J. Spracklin, 
owner. 

Freckles (Lady's Count Gladstone-Lady Brady), 
orange and white bitch, August 2, 1900; J. J. Sprack- 
lin, owner. 

Selkirk Myra (Lady's Count Gladstone-Selkirk 
Freda), black, white and tan bitch, May 10, 1900; W. 
B. Wells, owner. 

Selkirk Wanda (Lady's Count Gladstone-Selkirk 
Freda), liver and white bitch, May 10, 1900; W. B. 
Wells, owner. 

Comte de Frontenac (Toledo Bee-Duster), black and 
white dog, June 20, 1900; W. J. Campau, owner. 

Rose Bonheur (Toledo Bee-Duster), black, white and 
tan bitch, June 20, 1900; W. J. Campau, owner. 

Korin's Noble (Korin K.-Bo Bell), black, white and 
tan dog, January 28, 1900; Reynolds & Perkins, owners. 

Frank Frost (Donald Bane-Lady Vassar II.), white 
and black dog, March 20, 1900; M. K. Cowan, owner. 

Prince of Kent (Barney-Maud S.), white and black 
dog, April 5, 1900; T. C. Stagman, owner. 

Toney's Midget (Toney Boy-Druid Daisy), black, 
white and tan bitch, May 13, 1900; C. D. Stuart, owner. 

Sandy K. (Korin K. -Gipsy), liver and white dog, 
February 7, 1900; J. O. Riley, owner. 

Bell (Barney-Maud S.), white, April, 1900; P. Bro- 
diess, owner. 

Billy Brady (Cincinnatus Pride-Nellie Brady), black, 
white and tan dog, April 8, 1900; A. D. Opdyke, owner. 

Count Holmes (Count Diamond-Little Dorritt), black, 
white and tan dog, October, 1900; F. L. Holmes, owner. 

General Roborts (Oeolus-Hootalingua), black, white 
and tan dog, January 29, 1900, H. T. W. Ellis, owner. 

Phoebe Strathroy Windem (Lady's Count Gladstone 
-Phoebe Windem). blue belton, August 8, 1900; L. H. 
& M. A. Smith, owners. 

Phoebe Nellie Windem (Lady's Count Gladstone- 
Phoebe Windem), blue belton bitch, August 8, 1900; 
L H. & M. A. Smith, owners. 

Donald (Donald Bane-Tonoy's Nellie), orange and 
white dog, March, 1900; M. C. Byer's owner. 

Monk's Girl (Monk of the Dale-Queen of the Meadow) 
black, white and tan bitch, August, 1900; M. C. Byers, 
owner. 

Nellie Byers (Donald Bane-Gladstone Jess), black 
and white bitch, March, 1900; M. C. Byers, owner. 

Bald Head (Lady's Count Gladstone-Lady Brady), 
black, white and tan dog, August 2, 1900; J. J. Spack- 
lin, owner. 

Blue Boy (Lady's Count Gladstone-Lady Brady, 
black, white and tan dog, August 2, 1900; J. J. Spack- 
lin, owner. 

POINTERS. 

(Dot's Dell-Dot Jingo), liver and white 



fc?$g^s3C?5£Ss3 CsSSSsa K&Ssa ESSsa gfe^sa g^tea ts^SSsa 

Coming Events. 

July 21— Olympic Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 

July21— Washington Gun Club. Blue rocks. Washington, Yolo 
county. 

July 2!' ^San Francisco Gun Club. Live birds. Ingleside 
July 2a— Empire Gun Club shoot. Blue rocks. Alameda 
Junction. 

July 28— Capital City Gun Club. Blue rocks. Kimball & Upson 
grounds. Sacramento. 

Aug. 1— Deer season opens. Closed season commences Oct. 1. 

Aug. 3— Grass Valley Sportsman's Club. Trap shoot and "camp 
stew." 

Aug. 4— California Wing Club. Live birds. Ingleside. 
Aug. 4— Union Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 
Aug. 4— Lincoln Gun Club. Blue rocks. Alameda Junction- 
Aug 4— Antler Gun Club. Blue Rocks. Empire Club grounds' 
Alameda Junction. 

Aug. 11— Olympic Gun Club. Live birds. Ingleside. 
Aug. 11— San Francisco Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 
Aug. 11— Empire Gun Club Blue rocks. Alameda Junction. 
Sept. 8, 9— Empire Gun Club. Blue rock tournament and mer 
chandise prize shoot. Alameda Junction 
Sept. 29— Union Gun Club. Live birds. Ingleside. 



The Hea rt of the Woods. 

I hear it beat in morning still 
When April skies have lost their gloom, 

And through the woods there runs a thrill 
That wakes arbutus into bloom. 

I hear it throb in sprouting May— 

A muffled murmur on the breeze, 
Like mellow thunder leagues away, 

Or booming voice of distant seas. 

In daisied June I catch its roll, 

Pulsing through the leafy shade; 
And fain I am to reach its goal, 

And see the drummer unafraid. 

Or when the autumn leaves are shed, 

And frosts attend the fading year, 
Like secret mine sprung by my tread 

A covey bursts from hiding near. 

I feel its pulse 'mid winter snows, 

And feel my own with added force, 
When red-ruff drops his cautious pose, 

And forward takes his humming course. 

The startled birches shake their curls, 

A withered leaf leaps in the breeze: 
Some hidden mortar speaks, and hurls 

Its feathered missile through the trees. 

Compact of life, of fervent wing, 

A dynamo of feathered power, 
Thy drum is music in the spring, 

Thy flight is music every hour. • 

—John Burroughs in the Atlantic Monthly. 



$4.50. Third class: Allen, 18 yards, broke 17; Fish, 
18-lo; Cullen, 18-14. Allen won the money, $3. 

State championship "Yellowstone" trophy, 25 birds 
— Hauer 21, Hauer (back score) 20, Debenham 21, Deb- 
enham (back score) 19, Fish 16, Fish (back score) 17, 
Reed 16. 

_ Schumacher handicap trophy, 20 birds shot in 10 
singles and 5 pair doubles, distance handicap— Swales, 
18 yards, broke 17; Debenham, 18-18; Haver. 20-16; 
Allen, 18-12; Searls, 18-15; Fish, 18-13. 

Several 10 bird events showed the following scores — 
Swales 10, 5, 7, 6, 7; Webb 9, 7, 9: Fish 4, 5, 4, 8; Reed 
5, 7, 7; Debenham 6, 7; Ireland 7, 6, 7; Baird 8, 9, 6; 
Cullen 8, 6, 6; Allen 8, 4; Searls 6, 6, 7, 8; Hauer 8, 6, 6. 

The San Francisco Gun Club blue rock shoot last 
Sunday was interesting to trap shooters, being the 
occasion of the initial shoot for the Phil. P. Bekeart 
perpetual challenge cup. Seven men entered. A. J. 
Webb won the race with the excellent score of 94 out 
of 100 targets. He also won 50% of the purse, M. O. 
Feudner won 30%, Ed Schultz and W. J. Golcher 
divided 20% of the money. The purse was increased 
with the addition of $10 by Mr. Bekeart. The winner 
was challenged by Otto Feudner on the conclusion of 
the match. The high score in the club race was made 
by Edgar L. Forster, who broke 25 straight. The 
scores made during the day follow: 

Club match, 25 targets — 

Murdock.W. R mil 00101 11010 01010 11101—16 

Feudner.M.O inn mn oilll 11111 10111—24 

Forster. E.L lOOll 11111 11111 11111 11111-23 

Schultz, Ed Hill llllioilll 11111 11111—24 

Feudner, F moi 11111 11111 11111 11011—23 

Neustadter, N. H 01 1 1 1 11111 10110 11111 11011—21 

Kerrison, R. E 11110 11111 01010 11111 11011 20 

King, F. W 00101 11101 11011 01111 11111—19 

Neustadter, N. R.f 01111 11111 11111 00101 11111—21 

Forster, E. L.f 11111 lllll lllll 11111 11111—25 

Shultz, E.f 11101 lllll 11110 lllll 11111—23 

Feudner, F moo 101 1 1 lllll 11011 11111—21 

Haight, C. A 10111 lllll lllll 11101 11111—23 

Bruns, J 11110 11110 10011 lllll 11111—21 

"Wilson" mil lllll 11101 lllll 11111—24 

Klevesahl, E 01101 10101 01111 11101 01101—17 

Bruns, J.f lllll 01111 lllll lllll 10110—22 

"Wilson" lllll mil 10111 01111 10111—22 

Rosenberg, R C mil 11110 11110 11100 11111—21 

Rosenberg, R. C.t 11110 11100 10111 11110 00111—18 

Golcher. W. J lllll lllll lllll 11110 11011—23 

Sweeney, J. J lllll 10111 01011 lllll 11111—22 

fBack scores 

Practice scores at 25 blue rocks — Schultz 21,20, M. 
O. Feudner 24, Forster 21, King 17, 19, 20, 22, Kerrison 
23, 22, Neustadter 77, Klevesahl 19, "Wilson" 19, 24, 
Robinson 15, Shaw 19, 17, 16, Donohoe 15, McConnell 
18, "Top" 8, "Wallno"14. 

Practice scores at 15 blue rocks — Gordon 11, Kerrison 
15, "Top" 3, Feudner 11, Sweeney 10, King 11. 

Ten blue rock event — "Slade" 7, "Wilson" 7, Kleve- 
sahl 6, Feudner 10, King 9, Gordon 10, Knick 3, Neu- 
stadter 9. 

Bekeart Perpetual Challenge Cup race, $100 targets, 
$5 entrance, $10 added, 3 moneys, 50, 30 and 20 per 
cent— 

Feudner, M. O 



Cartridge and Shell. 

The California valley quail are fairly plentiful in 
certain districts of New Zealand where they have been 
liberated. 

Reports from Marin county are to the effect that 
quail are more numerous this season, particularly on 
the preserved grounds, than they have been for years 
past. The young cnicks are well grown and so tame 
that they have been caught by hand at times. The 
old birds are also very tame; they have been seen to 
invade camps, hop on the tables and pick up bread 
crumbs, etc. 

As the open season for deer approaches the tempta- 
tion to violate the law, by being a few days "previous" 
in procuring venison, is more than some people can 
withstand. There seems to be cow a general alertness 
in many counties by the officials and sportsmen for the 
purpose of apprehending "sooners. " Mendocino 
county has enjoyed the reputation for some seasons 
past of jealously protecting her game and fish interests 
in close time. On Tuesday last W. N. Dutton was 
arrested for killing deer and fined $40 next day. E. 
Brown and L. Lenbe were also arrested and convicted 
for the same offense and fined $25 each at Ukiah. 



At the Traps. 

The Olympic Gun Club regular monthly shoot at 
blue rocks will be held to-morrow at Ingleside. The 
club match at 25 targets and three 15 bird races, added 
money, are on the program. A 100 bird race for the 
Bekeart perpetual challenge cup will take place between 
A. J. Webb, the present holder of the cup, and Otto 
Feudner. This race is the result of a challenge made 
by Feudner last Sunday. 

The monthly shoot of the Empire Gun Club, held at 
Alameda Point Sunday, was only fairly well attended, 
many of the members are now away on vacations. 
The day was a perfect one and many good scoros were 
made in the different ovents. A. J. Wobb was high 
for the day in the club championship raco with a clean 
score of 25 breaks to his credit. For the state cham- 
pionship "Yollowstono" trophy Debenham and Hauer 
divided honors with 21 breaks each. Tho best scores 
for the Schumacher handicap trophy were likewise 
made by Debenham and Hauer, who scored 18 breaks 
each. 

Club diamond medal championship race, 25 targets — 
Webb 25, Webb (back score) 21, Ireland 21, Baird 19, 
Reed 19, Swales 19, Hauer 18, Debenham 18, Searls 18, 
Fish 16, Cullop 15, Allon 14. 

The scores in this event also classified in tho Money 
Match and the shoot off for the club'sl monthly purse 
of $15 which resulted as follows: Webb and Ireland 
being tie for the first monoy, $6 divided. The remain- 
ing classes shot for the balance of the purse at 25 birds 
(15 singles and 5 pair doubles), distance handicap. 
Second class: Swales, 13 yards, broke 21; Hauer, 20-39; 
Searls, 18-16; Reed, 18-15; Debenham, 20-14; Baird, 
18-8. Swales being high in this class won the money, 



Feudner, F. 



Haight, C. A. 



.11111 lllll 11011 lllll 11110- 
11111 11110 lllll lllll 01111- 
01101 lllll 11110 lllll 11111- 

11110 10111 11111 11111510111- 

.11011 01101 01X110 01111 lllll — 

11111 lllll lllll 01111 lllll- 
Ollll 10111 11101 lllll 11101- 

11111 11111 11111 01110 11101- 

.10111 10111 lllll 11110 01101- 

10101 10111 11111 mil 11110- 
10110 01111 10011 11111 10011- 
11111 11101 11111 11111 11111- 



Schultz, E. L. 



Bruns, J. 



Golcher, W. J. 



.11111 11011 lllll 11110 

11011 11101 11110 lllll 

lllll lllll 10110 11011 

11110 01111 lllll lllll 
.01111 10011 11011 11011 

11001 mn 01111 11111 

11111 11101 1 1110 01110 
11011 11011 11111 11111 

.11111 11111 10111 10111 

11111 11111 11101 11101 

11011 11110 11101 1 101 1 

01111 11111 11111 11011 



11111- 
11101- 
11111- 
11011- 
01111- 
01111- 
11111- 
11101- 
11111- 
mil- 
lion- 
11011- 



Webb, A. J. 



.11111 00111 lllll lllll 111 lO- 
ll 1 1 1 lllll lllll lllll 11111- 

11111 11101 lllll lllll lllll 

11111 11101 10111 11111 11m- 



—23 
-23 
-22 

-22-90 
-17 
-24 
-21 

-22—84 
-23 
-21 
-18 

-24—83 
-23 
-21 
-22 

-22-88 
-19 
-21 
-21 

-22-83 
-23 
-23 
-20 

-22—88 
-22 
-25 
-24 

-23-94 



A lively bunch of birds last Sunday made trap shoot- 
ing agreeable for the Olympic Gun Club members. 
In the club race "Slade" shot a clean score in high 
class style, good centers and a quick second on danger- 
ous pigeons showed "Slade" to be in splendid shooting 
form. Otto Feudner and Geo. H. T. Jackson also 
made straight strings. Shaw had the bad luck to 
lose two strong birds, loaded up with shot, which 
dropped dead out. In the club race "Slade" and 
Feudner divided the side purse, two moneys, high 
guns. Jackson and Shaw won the eight bird purse. 
In a seven bird sweepstakes Donohoe, Haight and 
Jackson divided. Golcher and Jackson won tho money 
for high guns in the ten bird pool. Jackson and Don- 
ohoe divided in the concluding raco for the day at six 
birds. The scores made were as follows: 

Club match at 15 pigeons, 30 yards rise. Side pool, 
$5 entrance — 

"Slade" 21211 11121 11123-15 

Fouduer, M. 12211 lllll 21111—15 

Jackson, G. H. T.t H112 21122 11222-15 

Donohoe, Ed.f 12222 *1122 12221—14 

Golcher, W. J 22111 22122 02122-14 

Donohoe, Ed 22211 21210 11121—14 

Shaw, C. H 22222 *22*2 22222—13 

Jaokson, G. H. T 2212* 12122 21021-13 

McConnell, Dr.J 1O021 00122 11022—10 

fBack scores. X Guest. * Dead out. 
Eight bird swoepstakes, $2.50 entrance, 30 yards rise — 

Jackson 11112211—8 Douohuo 12222*11—7 

Shaw 12212222-8 Haight 10112202—6 

McConnell 22121 121— 8 

Seven bird sweopstakos, $2.50 entrance, 30 yards rise — 

Jackson 2211222—7 Shaw 22222*2—6 

Haight 2222212-7 McConnell 112*111—6 

Donohoe 2 1 1 222 1 —7 

Ton bird sweepstakes, $2.50 entrance, 30 yards rise — 

Jackson 22121 12112-10 Rosenborg 12211 12101—9 

Golcher 21121 11222—10 Shaw 02222 22200—7 

Haight 21*1111121—9 Feudner 21220 Ow —4 

Donohue 22*22 12222- 

Six bird pool, $2.50 entrance, 30 yards rise — 

Donohoe 111122—6 McConnell 2111*1—5 

Jackson 21 1212—6 Rosenborg 022*12—4 

Haight 112022-5 Forster *1211«— 4 



^ $cmbtv mtfc sportsman 

Z7, 7, 4. T «„™ !iml »nt Following are the scores for Saturday in the several 
The Sacramento Tournament. eventa: 

The Northern California bluerock tournament on - ^ ^ ^ m n ^ 

theKimball* Upson grounds .at f ~f ^ bcrtson » 5 » » A. " i 

day and Sunday last was attended by 63 shooters on Uusto 18 ,„ „ 19 15 K 

the first day and 70 an Sunday. In many events the }? IS X n if V. 

17 men were not in the money. The high average of g , ,3 ,u .. .. .5 .. 

the first day was made by J. B. McCutchan, breaking Mc 3 ut ^:\\^:\V^\V:.\ SO 18 80 SO SO M » 
133 out of a possible 140. Johnson of Chico won ^the g^fo™';;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;; » g 19 }| } 8 

Ruhstaller GUt Edge trophy for high average on Sun- Kngjehardt 15 14 14 13 IB U .. 

day, scoring 116 out of 120 (98|%). The Chico earn ^^i;;;;;;;;;;:;;;; | ,„ g » ,8 

retained the Northern California champion team Qo^...................... » .7 .5 » .3 .. 

. „, „ Peterson 19 19 20 19 19 .. 

trophy. . . Jones 15 80 15 19 18 

The winners in tho different events are given below. McElvvaln ; WW'.'.'.'.'.'. 20 16 19 19 18 .. .. 
The conditions and the program of events for each day Hrt^... . ... ............ i> jj 17 17 w 

were given in full in our issue of July 6th: I Sft ^y* g i? 3 If !f " " 

SATURDAY. Adams 1« 1" 1« W 14 

Event No. 1-McCutchan, McElwain, Vettor, 20 each; |tev^. L. ........ ...... n 18 « 18 |» .. 

divided first money, $15. Zentgraf, Peterson, Hotch- Jta&ritor .8 .6 is 16 17 15 16 

kiss, Rust, Peck, Kindburg, Newbert, Melor, Herold, m^^;;;.;; » U J7 is is 

19 each, divided second money, $10. Gusto, Hoxie, g g » » ! 8 9 g » 

Hughes, E. L. Peudner, H. L. Steven,, Epperson Newbert...... ...... ........ 19 » » » » » [J 

Ruhstaller, Weldon, Brock, Eckhardt, 18 each, divided Howell g , ,2 jj 

Williams 12 14 la 11 ■■ 

third money, $0. . ., , Brock 18 12 15 10 14 18 

Event No. 2-Jones and Johnson, 20 each; divided MeUor » » » H .8 15 .. 

first money, $23. Buergi, Scatina, Peterson, Newbert. jg.. ..; 20 m » ijj J8 w « 

Melor, Palm, Herold, 19 each; divided second money, J^y;;;;;" """j::;:: g g $ I" it* 18 Is 

$13.80. Gusto and Stevens divided third money, with fg^» tf;> ^ :: » » |« 18 jj ;; " 

18 each $9 20. Mitchell .'....'.'....' 15 17 14 17 11 16 

Extra event-McCutchan, Peterson and Palm di- Johnson...................... 17 » J9 19 18 .. .. 

vided first, with 20 each, $20.50. Hoxie, Scatina, Feud- Thomson 17 16 is 20 17 .- .. 

ner McElwain, Apperson, Black and Johnson, with Frazee WW.WWW.'.'.W..W 17 16 18 « .. 

19 'each, divided second money, $12.30. Buergi, Reeves....................... M M 7 .. .. .. ~ 

Hughes, Burston, Rust, Weldon Newbert Vetter, Salisbury |« » •• ■• 

wuson, Thomason and Melor, with is each, divided g^f,;;;;;/."/.;:;;;;;;; ;; :; ;; iS is .. .. 

third money, $8.20. Adams, E. D }3 Jjj .. .. 

Event No. 3 -McCutchan and Thomason, with 20 Jnal 12 e 16 18 

each, divided first money, $25 Gusto, Gould .Peter- ^^..............y.^. .. .. .. || .. 

son, Jones, McElwain, Rust, Weldon, Newbert, Vetter, wllBon 13 .. 

Eckhardt, Johnson and Brooks divided second money, Chapman 4 

$15, with' a score of 19. Buergi, Zentgraf Scatma, .. g ■■ 

Black, Barnham and Frazee divided $5, with 1- each. Y oerk ... » •• •• 

Merchandise shoot— McCutchan won first in class 1, Bryant.. 17 

Weldon , Peterson and Salisbury were 1. 2, 3 in class 2; woodwortb . . . 

Hotchkiss and Rust were the winners in class 3; t,ck- Sunday individual event scores were as follows: 

hardtand Brooks in class 4; Buergi and Just in class events. 1 2 » * « 

5- Herold and Eckhardt in class 6, Brock and I aim in birds. 20 20 2u 20 20 20 

class 7; Gould in class 8, and H. Williams in class 9. - - - ^ v 

Extra ovent-Newbert won first, with 20 , $10.. . ^»» u « 20 18 18 15 16 16 

Buergi and Black second, with 19 each, divided $6.30, Kinberg . . . is 17 i» 18 is 15 

Eckhardt, Brock, Hotchkiss and McCutchan with 18 server {« }6 19 20 20 18 

each, divided $4.20. Newbert 19 19 is 19 26 26 

Extraevent— Gusto and Black, with 20 each, divided Peterson 19 19 18 20 W 17 

first money, $8.50; McCutchan and Gould, 19 each, Jones 20 8 is 7 7 6 

divided second money, $6.10; Hotchkiss Garnett and g^i^^;;;;;;;;;;;;;;:;;::;: 1? 1? 12 18 11 » 

Eckhardt divided third money, $3.40, with 18 each. Geo.Feudner n » 19 18 * J;1 

SUNDAY. HolHng « J8 j| ^ g }» 

First event-Black, Jones, Vetter, Johnson, Lange Vetter » 17 is n is M 

and Maxwell divided first money, $25; Newbert, Peter- Zentgraf ..;..;;;;:;;;:::.:;::::.;:: is 19 16 |« 15 is 

son, Palm, Milor, Brooks, Lowry, Tooly, Hughes and Palm. J| }» » » ,J " 

De Shiels, with 19 each, divided second money $15 gUte }» j| jf }7 }5 J« 

Kindberg, E. L. Feudner, O. Stevens, Zentgraf, H ° "winiams; 11 . .. •• •• 

Rohwer, Just and Eckhardt, with 18 each, divided Woodworth « ■■ ■• ■ ]? 

third money, $10. Jotagwu » is 20 19 20 19 

Second event— Newbert, Peterson, Zentgraf, Palm, Brooks....'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 19 is h is 16 

Thomason, Tooly, Just and H. L. Stevens, with 19 thomason a » a „ * J» 

each, divided first money, '$40; Black, Jones, Gould, Lange. ao 17 17 12 W J5 

Johnson, Brooks, Burston, Barnham and Eckhardt, ^™W.W.'.'.'.WW'.V.V...'..'..'WWWW 13 15 18 .'.' 12 

with 18 each, divided second money, $25; Ruhstaller, ^SSST^«".".'^"'- » » w « tt W 

Kindberg, McElwain, Gusto, Vetter, O. Stevens, McCutchan }9 17 18 18 18 19 

Buergi, Hotchkiss, Lange, Rohwer and Epperson, Bueston • }» " j» y g 14 

with 17 each, divided third money, 115. Branham 13 is is ,, • • 

Third event-Johnson and Hotchkiss, with 20 each, Brock 15 6 s .. s 8 

divided first money, $40; Kindberg, McElwain, Q Tooiey. ;;;;;;;;;;;;; g g f? 18 

Fuedner, O. Stevens, Palm, Richardson and Rust, with Ijobertson.'. .'.'.'.'.'.'. 19 W 16 is 18 19 

19 each, divided second money, $25; Black, Newbert, W eidon,c.A " a .. •• •• » 

Peterson, HolUng, Gusto, Melor, Davis, Lowry, Brock, 11 .. " .. 

Weldon, Eckhardt, Frazee and Epperson, with 18 jj„° s " B M it 19 is 17 

each, divided third money, $15; Ruhstaller, Feudner gurt. " j» 19 » 17 g 

Thomason, Lange, Barnum, Tooly, Hughes, Rose and -^ ( , klV I9 3 '.'. " 1! 

H. Stevens, with 17 each, divided fourth money, $10. chapman..'...:: '7 ■ }g „■ •• }J 

Fourth event— For the Kimball & Upson bluerock Dr weldon « •• g 20 26 s 

trophy cup, Dr. Weldon and Peterson were tied each ^khardt 18 }9 j« j» ^ 

breaking 20 bluerocks. The management decided that gj^^;;;;;;:;;:;::;;;;:..;...;.. 20 19 J4 

the shoot-off would be decided in the next event, at 20 Adams 17 u . . .. '» |3 

birds, in which Weldon again broke 20 straight, and Eppwson a • 

Peterson 18. Mr. Peterson, however, claimed that he smith .:*.'.'.'.... a ■■ ■■ 

did not understand the arrangement and entered a su-yens, 11. L 19 a n W 

Wright 1 F *■ *• ** "* 

Pr Fifth event— Newbert, George Feudner, Johnson, M^ lstine ;;;;;;.;.'.;:.'.'.':;.'.';.'.'.'. :: " '5 

Thomason, Hotchkiss and Weldon, with 20 each, smith Jjj \\ 

divided first money, $60. E. L. Feudner, Gusto, Eck- Davy •• •• g , 

hardt, MaxweU, Adams and Epperson, with 19 each, ^^\\\\\\\\\\\\'::::i:".. v „.. .. .. .. 13 |3 

divided second money, $45. McElwain, Vetter, Buergi, u ra dy ^ >° 

Lowry, Brock, Rose and Frazee, with 18 each, divided gj*-- * ;• " .. 17 

third money, $30. Peterson, Jones, Palm, Lange, ^^[ J ;:;:.WWWWW.WWWWWW \* 

Tooly, Rust and H. L. Stevens, with 17 each, divided Peek.^ jjj 

^Sixtheven^' (merchandise prizes)— Class 1,20 (breaks, ^^WW^W^WWWW^IZ'WW W W. U 

McElwain first, Herold second, Newbert third. Class Sou ie H 

2. 19 breaks, HoUing first, Gusto second, Peek third. Wolf...... ■• •• ;; " „, 

Class* 3, 18 breaks, Hotchkiss first, Thomason second, ggjKJJEI";; -\\\\\ M 

Weldon third. Class 4, 17 breaks, Peterson hrst, Eck- Finnie •• |j 

hardt second, Rust third. Class 5, 16 breaks, Frazee Trumpler 

first, Black second, Richards third. Class 6, 15 breaks. • 

B^-A^flSb VSkiSL Oat ^Sbkii 4 The Woods man's W ild Garden. 

^^"^fil^^^^^. Someinterestingsuggestionsandsensibleremarksre- 

Seventh event— Six man team shoot for Northern garding a subject that is of much importance to camp- 
California Blue Rock Trophy, at 15 birds. Chico team erg and hunting parties is given in the following article 

81, Washington Gun Club 77, Sacramento Gun Club 77, Buckham, which appeared in the American 
Willows Club 71, Capital City Gun Club 09, Dixon °J > vv 
Gluh 69. ™ M: 



[July 20, 1901 



The greatest need of tho nomadic woodsman is what 
we comprehensively call "garden stuff." Of meat he 
generally has a plenty, and it only too apt to make 
that practically his sole article of diet. The natural 
craving of the stomach for vegetable food, especially 
fresh green vegetables, is habitually ignored by hunt- 
ers and trappers who penetrate far into the wilderness, 
and the result is that the system gets clogged with the 
waste of animal matter. The kidneys and bladder are 
irritated by excess of phosphorous, the blood is over- 
heated, and constipation, with its invariable accessory 
of rheumatism, becomes the familiar ailment of the 
woodsman. 

All this is the result, I believe, not so much of necess- 
ity as of ignorance. It is by no means impossible, as 
the woodsman commonly believes, to obtain fresh veg- 
etable food, even in the remotest fastnesses of the 
wilderness. Indeed, tho woods and ponds and streams 
are an inexhaustible wild garden, well stocked save in 
the dead of winter with native vegetables whose edible 
qualities need only to be understood by the camper in 
order to furnish him with a most wholesome and de- 
lightful addition to his meager bill of fare. 

I am surprised that this fact seems so little known 
even by skilled and veteran woodsmen. Having 
camped with some of the best guides and sportsmen, I 
have invariably found that thoir knowledge of the 
edible plants of tho woods was just about as extensive 
as a cat's knowledge of astronomy. The botany of 
their own domain is thus a terra iivcognita to them. 
And this seems all the stranger when we consider how 
intimately and thoroughly the trained woodsman un- 
derstands everything else about him — everything that 
can minister to his comfort, health, profit or sport. 
He can tell you enough about birds and beasts, signs 
and seasons, to make an encyclopedia; but he will sit 
down to a meal of everlasting pork, venison and trout, 
and simply sigh for the tang of some green vegetable 
to "take the lump out of his stomach" — simply sigh 
for it, I say, when by going six rods from camp with a 
little elementary knowledge of his resources he might 
have his heart's (and stomach's) desire. 

From May until December no woodsman who will 
take tho trouble to study or learn from another's ex- 
perience a little of the botany of the woods need go 
without a sufficient supply of vegetables from his wide- 
stretching wild garden. Or perhaps if ho will only 
watch tho deer and bear for awhile, instead of shooting 
them on sight, he will learn, ar the newspapers say, 
"something to his advantage." 

There are times when it seems to the meat-clogged 
hunter and fisherman as if he would give half his king- 
dom for a mouthful of some tart or peppery or bitter 
vegetable, to cleanse and purge his alimentary canal 
and get theleaden feeling out of his stomach. At such 
times, instead of sighing for the vegetable pots of 
civilization, let him devote half an hour to gathering 
a bunch of the roots of the toothwort or crinkled root, 
which may bo eaten, like radishes, dipped in salt, and 
will lend a delicious savor to a meal of meat and bread. 
Another pungent root or tuber growing plentifully in 
the woods is the ground nut or dwarf ginseng. You 
can find it in almost any moist clearing, though you 
must dig deep for the small round tuber that tastes so 
grateful to the meat-jaded palate. 

I hesitate to speak of mushrooms as an article of 
woodland diet, because, plentiful as they are about old 
stumps, logs, etc., a special knowledge of them is neces- 
sary to guard against confusing them with poison 
toadstools, which they so closely resemble. But if 
some member of tho party only possessed this knowl- 
edge, what a feast might be enjoyed far from the 
luxuries of civilization! 

The woodman's wild garden, however, grows many 
varieties of wholesome and delicious "greens," which, 
in the spring, any camper may easily recognize and 
have for tho picking. Along the brookside in how 
many old boaver meadows have I crushed while trout 
fishing the luscious leaves and stalks of marsh mari- 
golds or cowslips! None in tho river meadows of the 
settlement grows finer than this unmarketed vegetable 
of the wildwoods. And how these cowslip greens re- 
fresh the whole system, when boiled in the camp pot 
and served with a dash of vinegar, salt and pepper! 
Every camper should take a small jug of vinegar with 
him into the woods, "just for greens," as the boys say. 

Then there is that other wholesome and delicious pot 
herb of the woods called familiarly cow cabbage 
(botanically Jlydmphyllum viryinicum). This has not 
so wido a range as tho marsh marigold, but in localities 
where it is found it grows abundantly, and has the ad- 
vantage of leafing out earlier than cowslips, and re- 
maining tendor and edible for a longer period. Tril- 
liuins also make excellent greens, and as the camper 
will find them growing late into June, in the open 
woods, he can prolong with them his pot herb diet 
until the very height of the trouting season. 

The wild parsnip, found growing along water edges 
in May and June, is fully as palatable as the cultivated 
variety, and is an excellent appetizer when fried or 
browned in the camp spider. The Indian cucumber 
root, which any field botanist can unearth for you in 
the fall, is not much behind the garden cucumber in 
succulence and flavor. The Indians used it for a relish 
and tho woodsman will find it a welcome addition to 
his bill of fare. Serve with vinegar, pepper and salt. 

The roots of the yellow pond lily, chopped fine and 
fried, have a very pleasant taste, and make a whole- 
some and readily accessible vegetable food in the woods. 
Wild radish; if you know it and can find it, is a really 
crisp and pungent relish, with much the same taste as 
the gardon radish, which was derived from it. 

Almost every boy should remomber the watercresses 
he used to gather in the cool brooks about his native 
town. The camper will find it in the quieter reaches 
of mountain streams, and under the banks of mountain 
lakes. In the latter, too, he will find the wild celery, 
of which ducks are so fond, and which is grateful also 
to a discriminating human palate. How nicely either 
the cress or the wild celery spices the guide's biscuits 
and the flaky pink flesh of mountain trout! Wild 
mustard and horseradish, too, will put a keen edge on 
a dulled appetite, if you cannot find watercress. 



JULY|20, 1901] 



11 



THE FARM. 



The Work the Hogs Do in the 
Feed Lot. 



It is my custom to grow two small lots 
of hogs each year, 30 to 40 in a bunch. 
The spring farrowing I want to sell for 
market by the time the fall farrowing is 
a month or sis weeks old; the fall far- 
rowing to go out to market in the spring 
without being fed on grass. Last winter 
34 head had the run of a ten-acre clover 
sod field. They did more rooting than is 
usually done by the hogs wintered this 
way. They had salt and ashes constantly 
before them, but were not fed very much 
mill feed. When fed liberally of the 
latter, and the former always before them, 
they do not root constantly as they do 
when they have only corn as their grain 
ration. Probably the only advantage to 
be credited to their rooting in this case, 
writes John M. Jamison in the National 
Stockman, was the worms destroyed, cut 
worms and others that would have fed to 
some extent on the corn. The land re- 
quired more work to get it in order for 
corn than other fields that the hogs did 
not run over. ThiB bunch of hogs I 
wanted to sell without having them go 
out of pasture. But before going I wanted 
them to work up the coarse manure in 
the lots where I fattened lambs. Lambs 
when fed fodder, break it up less than 
any other farm stock to which it is fed 
To fork this over and tear it to pieces so 
that it will rot quickly and be easily 
handled with the fork in loading and un 
loading the wagons is hard work. The 
lambs in waste from their corn troughs 
left considerable shelled corn in this ac 
cumulation of corn stalks from day to day. 

1 he hogs when turned in the lots worked 
very steadily, turning over the stalks fo; 
corn scattered through them. I did not 
compel them to depend entirely on what 
they found here for their feed, but fed 
them ear corn and a small feed of middlings 
and clover chaff that had been soaked 
over night. They appeared to thrive first 
rate on this kind of treatment. The 
hardest manure we have to handle on the 
farm is that made in the sheep shed where 
they are fed clover hay and corn, being 
bedded occasionally with clover or wheat 
straw. It is packed so tight that we have 
found it easier to remove when cut in 
blocks with the axe. To avoid this cut 
ting and to fine the manure so that it 
could be scattered I tried the hogs for 
turning and tearing it to pieces, and found 
that they could do better work than I 
could get done in any other way. 

The amount of waste shelled corn scat 
tered through the manure was sufficient 
to keep them at work until the manure 
was all torn to pieces ?nd put in shape to 
be easily forked to and from the wagon. 

I do not think the hogs were any the 
worse for this exercise that saved so much 
hard work. Last year I tried scattering 
some shelled corn in the bedding, intend- 
ing to scatter the manure in blocks as cut 
from the stable and have the hogs tear it 
to pieces hunting for the corn it contained 
and finish the work of scattering while 
getting the last grain of corn, but I found 
this was not asjsatisfactory as to have them 
do the rooting before it was taken out of 
the shed. 

R. A. Pearson of the Dairy Division of 
the Department of Agriculture, just re- 
turned from a three-months' tour in Cuba 
and Porto Rico, says there is a large de- 
mand therefor dairy products, especially 
cheese, which is now supplied by Holland, 
Denmark, Italy and Switzerland, but 
might just as well be supplied by Ameri- 
can dairymen. 

When a paring or butcher knife be- 
comes loosened from the handle, take out 
the knife, fill the cavity two-thirds full of 
mixed resin and brickdust, heat the shank 
very hot and press it in quickly ; when 
cold the whole will be firm and solid. 



Managing Hogs for the Market. 

For myself I would prefer the Poland- 
China, as we want a good, large frame 
when we commence breeding, writes O. 
W. B. in Indiana Farmer. Also find that, 
they make the largest hog at the earliest 
age. No farmer can make hog raising 
profitable if he keeps his hogs 12 to 15 
months. He can have them large enough 
for the market in six to eight months. 
To do this keep the sows that are good 
breeders, and above all a good, strong male 
hog, as all are aware of the fact that the 
male counts half in breeding. Keep the 
sows in a healthy condition, and in some 
field where they can have plenty of exer- 
cise and running water. I give slops of 
soft food in connection with corn. So 
many say they cannot make hog raising 
profitable, but I find that if handled right 
they are the feeders that make the bank 
account for the farmer. They need good 
attention and plenty of feed; also good, 
warm feeding in the winter season. 

I would prefer my sows to farrow in 
March, and again in September. The 
spring pigs soon begin to eat grass and 
clover in connection with their slop and a 
mixture of shorts whicR I find make a 
fine feed for them. And my pigs farrowed 
in September get a good start for winter- 
My sows are also in a good condition for 
winter. Just how to feed and when to 
sell is the most important of all. I do 
most of my feeding in the spring and in 
summer do not try to fatten hogs on dry 
corn alone. I find that plenty of clover 
or grass is necessary to have in connec 
tion with corn ; also all waste from our 
kitchen, with a mixture of shorts and 
bran. This keeps hogs healthy and hearty. 
In fall and winter feeding if possible 
secure some soft food for your hogs. 

In selling I manage if possible to sell 
when I have a sure profit. We sometimes 
hold our hogs too long, when we could 
have sold and realized a good profit. 



Value of Regular Milking. 



Hay and Straw Blend. 

More than twenty-five years ago we 
gathered from the Mark Lane Express the 
fact that in England they always stacked 
straw with layers of freshly cut trass well 
salted. The grass need not lie in the field 
at all, for the straw will take the moisture 
out of it and will not heat or mould. We 
advocated trying this year in and year 
out. Hon. John Boggs tried it, and prac- 
ticed it when he had the alfalfa ready 
when the straw was being stacked, and it 
was a perfect success. It brings the straw 
up to first class hay. All the aroma and 
strength of the hay that evaporates in cur- 
ing is taken up by the straw. Farmers 
who have alfalfa to cut after harvest 
should make a practice to make layers of 
say four feet deep of straw and two feet 
deep of fresh cut alfalfa, and throw on 
salt very liberally.— Colusa Sun. 



The practical value of regularity in 
milking has long been recognized, but few 
dairymen observe it strcitly to the letter 
every day in the season. 

Some years ago a series of tests showed 
me that cows milked at irregular intervals 
although twice within the twenty-four 
hours, shrank in yield on an average to 
each animal of half a pound daily, or 
three and a half pounds during the period 
of a week. During this time other cows 
in the herd milked with the utmost 
regularity as to hour, morning and night, 
maintained an even flow without shrink- 
age. 

Not caring to render the first numbe 
wholly unprofitable, a return to regular 
milking was made at the end of a week, 
but even with this it took three weeks 
subsequent time before they regained 
the original yielding status. 

On even so-called dairy farms this sub 
ject is not given the importance that it 
merits, as witness, how oversleeping in 
the morning, or prolonged evening labor 
in the field, are made to infringe on the 
milking hour. 

Bear this in mind that if you milk cows 
at all, no other work on the farm that you 
are called to do is more important than 
this self-same milking. 

If you stay an hour late in the evening 
in the field to finish planting a crop o 
potatoes while your herd of cows stands 
at the pasture gate waiting to be milked 
what have you gained? 

The few extra rows of potatoes would 
grow as readily if planted the next morn 
ing, while what you have lost in milk 
yield may not be gained in many days of 
renewed vigilance. 

On this subject a cow is wiser than some 
of her masters. Milk her at a certain 
hour a few days, and while she carries no 
watch, animal intelligence guides her un 
erringly at the self-same hour to the ac 
customed milking place. 

You see, the average cow is anxious to 
be a good, faithful and profitable servant 
to her owner, but he often opposes this 
endeavor by his own carelessness or stub 
born ignorance. 

In the flush of feed of summer it is 
sometimes expedient to let only ten or 
eleven hours intervene between the morn 
ing's and the evening's milking, while 
thirteen or fourteen hours might separate 
the night's from the morning's lacteal ex- 
traction 

The reason for this is obvious, as the 
milch animal feeding more industriously 
during the day, secretes more milk in her 
udder by evening than through a corres- 
ponding time in the night, thus demand- 
ing earlier relief from her load. 

In every event see .that your cows are 
fed at a regular hour from day to day 
and you will have mastered one of the 
secrets (?) of profitable dairying.— Dr. 
George E. Newell, Buena Vista, Col. 



Reports from Arizona are to the effect 
that more than one Lirge cattle company 
has gone out of the business because it 
cost too much to protect stock against 
rustlers, and if not protected the loss was 
too great to admit of any profit being 
made. The Aztec Cattle Company, for 
instance, had by its book account some 
35,009 to 40,000 head, but when it rounded 
up its cattle but 10,000 were obtained. 
These were promptly sold and leases of 
lands and water-rights transferred. 

A dairyman in Marin county a short 
time since sold three of his cows because 
he did not think they gave enough milk 
for the amount of food they ate. He says 
his profits the following month were larger 
than they were the month previous to the 
sale. Many dairymen have cows in their 
herds which are unprofitable and they 
could easily find it out were they to keep 
a record of each individual. 

If sheep are not constantly in a good 
condition, the quality of the wool is 
affected to a more or less extent. 



Number of Times to Feed. 



The number of feeds which an animal 
receives daily and the hours at which the 
feed is administered is more or less a mat- 
ter of custom or habit. We observe the 
same thing in regard to the human family. 
Our German friends, for example, deem it 
best to partake of food five times a day, 
while the Americans usually follow the 
rule of three meals a day. All of us have 
met individuals who eat but twice daily, 
but are healthy and vigorous, and believe 
more frequent eating would be injurious 
rather than beneficial to themselves. The 
)ld saying that "there is no accounting for 
tastes" holds in relation to the times food 
is taken as well as to many other matters 
in life. Fattening cattle will make satis- 
factory gains if given a full grain allow- 
ance once daily, with roughage in the feed 
rack to be consumed at will. The dairy 
cow is a hard worked animal, and twice 
daily she returns to her owner the milk 
which she has produced in the wonderful 
transmutation from coarse provender to a 
wholly digestible substance. Under this 
heavy drain it seems reasonable to allow 
her grain twice a day, with coarse forage 
supplied not less frequently. The writer 
doubts the wisdom, however, of feeding a 
dairy cow first a little of this and then a 
little of that from time to time, as prac- 
ticed by some dairymen who are anxious 
to procure the best possible returns, think- 
ing they will gain by these never-ending 
attentions. The horse has a relatively 
small stomach and should receive food 
not less frequently than twice daily, morn- 
ing and evening, and probably it would be 
better to allow him a little grain at noon 
if he is hard worked and can be allowed 
a little time for midday rest. Idle horses 
need not receive their limited grain allow- 
ance more than twice daily, in addition to 
a liberal supply of roughage— W. A. Henry 
in Breeders'' Gazette. 



Col. W. R. Nelson, proprietor of the 
Kansas City Star, who is building up a 
fine herd of Shorthorn cattle, has tendered 
the management of the National Show to 
be held at Kansas City this fall a prize for 
the best bull and five of his get; the bull 
not to be considered in the contest but to 
be shown with his progeny. The latter 
need not necessarily be owned by the ex- 
hibitor. The prize is to go to the exhib- 
itor of the bull. This presents an inter- 
esting proposition to cattle breeders. 





SMi 


Kendall's Spavin Cure 

lathe only horse remedy that has 






stood out with special prominence 
all these years. Cures Spavins, 
Ringbones, splint*, Curbs and 
all Lameness. $1. a bottle ; 6 for 
85. All druggets. Uoeqaaled 
for family use. hook <*A Treatise 
on the Horse" sent free. Address 

Dr. B.J. Kendall Co. 
Enosburc Falls, Vt. 


•J 




kw * ■ 





LEG AND BODY WASH 



Race horses often become 
sore and stiff from con- 
tinued strain on the hard 
tracks. Nothing takes 
out this stillness and sore- 
ness like a wash com- 
pounded of diluted 




Turtle's Elixir. 



Apply to the legs and put on light hand- 
ages. Sponge the body and put on light 
blanket. Guaranteed to produce desired 
results or money back. 

Reading Trotting Park, Mums., March 23, 1000. 
Dr. s. A. Tuttle, V. S. 

DearSir: I huvo used your Kllxlr fur the past ten 
years, lu the diluted I'm in leu- a let- and lindy wash. 1 
consider It tho best wash forkeeplng horses from soring 
up. Horses done up with this wash are much less liable 
to take cold than when done up w ith witch hazel or any 
other wash 1 ever used. J. H. NAY. 

Our lOO.paKO book, "Veterinary Experience," FltEE. 
TUTTLE' S ELIXIR COMPANY, 
137 O'Farrell Street, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Beware of so-cnllui! BlltlW! WlWfl fnttlM hut Tuttle'i. 
Avoid all blisters; they offer only temporary relief If any. 
Home ofllce: 61 Iiovorly St., Boston, Mass. 



DR. SMITH'S 

CALORIC 



VITA OIL 



Cures lameness and|soreness in man and beast 
Ask any horse trainer about it. At all druggists 




§~ Your stable is not complete •without Quinn's 
Ointment. An infallible cure for all ordi« 
I nary horse afflictions. Follow the example 
set by the leading horsemen of the world and 
your stable shelf will always hold a bottle of 

Quinn's Ointment 

A. L, Thomas, Supt. Oanton Farm, Joliet, 111., romarks, 
"I enclose yon amount for six bottles of Ou inn's Ointment. 
After ono year's trial must confess it does all you claim for 
It." For Curbs, Splints, Spavins, Windpatls or Bunches. 

Price $i.oo per package. 
Sold by all druggists, 
or sent by mail. 
§ W. B. EDDY & CO., Whitehall, N. Y. 




12 



[July 20, 1901 



CONTRA COSTA COONTY 

AGRICULTURAL ASSN. No. 33 

CONCORD. 



SPEED PROGRAMME. 
Entries Close September 20th, 

With the Secretary. 

WEDNESDAY— SEPTEMBER 25TH. 

No. 1—2:25 Pace, Free to all, 3 In 5 $ 150 (XI 

No. 2— Stake race for district yearlings, 
Trot or Pace— Mile dash. Entries close 
August 5th. Entrance fee $2.50 on nom- 
ination; $2.50 September 1st and $5.00 
the day of the race. Three to start to 
get added money of $50.00. 
No. 3— Running, 'i mile and repeat 75 00 

THURSDAY— SEPTEMBER 38TH. 

No. 1— Free for all trot, 3 in 5 300 00 

No. 2— Stake race for district two year 
olds, trotters, mile dash. Entries close 
August 5th. Entrance fee $2.50 on nom- 
ination; $2.50 September 1st and $5.00 
the day of the race. Three to start to 
get added monoy of $50.00. 

No. 3— Running, mile dash 100 00 

No. 4— 2;35 Pace, district, 3 in 5 100 00 

FRIDAY — SEPTEMBER 27TH. 

No. 1— For three year old district trotters, 

3 in 5 100 00 

No. 2— Gentlemen's driving race for dis 
trict trotters. Owners to drive, 3 in 5 
(Horses starting in this race not eligi- 
ble to start in anv other race.) 75 00 

No. 3—2:40 Trot, district, 3 in 5 150 00 

No. 4 — Running, H mile and repeat 50 00 

SATURDAY— SEPTEMBER 28TH. 

No. 1— Free for all, Pace, 3 in 5 300 00 

No. 2— Running, s i mile 75 00 

No. 3—2:30 Trot, 3 in 5 150 00 

To constitute ownership in the district, the 
ownerof a horse must be either an actual resident 
therein, or his name must appear as a taxpayer on 
real estate therein. 

Entrance in all purse races 10 per cent, of purse. 
Payable one-half on nomination and one-half at 
12 o'clock m., day before the race. In all races the 
purse will be divided Into three moneys— 60 per 
cent., 30 per cent, and 10 per cent. 

Unless otherwise specified all races mile heats, 
3 in 5. 

All racing governed by National Association 
Rules. 

In all purse races noted above five or more paid 
up entries required to fill; three or more horses to 
start. Address, 

A. It McKENZIE, Secretary, 
Martinez, Cal. 



ANOTHER BIG AUCTION SALE 



OF SKLKCTEI) AND ACCEPTED 



German Government Artillery Horses, 



-CONSISTING OF- 



100 MARES AND GELDINGS. 

Broken single and double, and weighing from 1000 to 1350 pounds, and are from 4 to 10 years old. 
Many handsome single drivers, well matched teams and saddle horses. All are solid in color, and 
have passed the veterinarian's inspection. They are suitable for liverymen, stage owners, teamsters, 
expressmen, etc. No reserve. Terms cash. SALE T.-xKES PLACE 

TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1901, 

From lO A. M. sharp to 1:30 P. M. 

Occidental Horse Exchange, 720 Howard St. nr. 3d 



WM. G. LAYNG, 

*S» Horses at Salesyard July 30th 



Auctioneer. 



McKINNKT 2:11> 



Breed to the Champion of the World. 
McKINNEY 2:11 1-4 

By Alcyone, dam Rosa Sprague (grandam of FerenoO) 
2:10K) by Gov. Sprague. 

By the percentage of his performers in the 2:15 list McKinney is the 
champion sire of the world. At 13 years of age he has 30 stand- 
ard performers, one-half of which are in the 2:15 list. 

A Race Horse Himself.- 

He started in 28 races, won 25 of them.was twice second 
and once third. 

He is a Sire of Race Horses. 

Every one of his get in the 2:20 list secured the record 
in a race, and all are race winners. 

He is a champion in the show ring, champion on the race I 

track and a champion in tlie stud. 
In 1900 his get won first, second and fourth money in the Pacific 
Breeders Futurity, first and second money in the Occident Stake ' 
and first, second and third money in the Stanford Stake. The 
McKinneys are stake winners. Will make the season of 1901 at 



sire of 

Coney 2:02 

Jennie Mac 2;09 

Hazel Kinney 2:09^ 

Zolock 2:10J4 

Zombro 2:11 

You Bet fclSJf 

McZeus 2:13 

Dr. Book 2: 13M 

Osito 2:13H 

Juliet D 2:13H 

McBriar 2:14 

Harvey Mac 2:14)4 

Geo. W. McKinney. . . .2:H!4 

McNally 2:15 

Monica 2:15 

and 15 more in 2:30 



FOR SALE. 
A BAY FILLY. 

1 YEARS OLD, TROTTER, BY DICTATUS 
°* 2:17; has just been broken and drives nicely. 
Also, a small Black Mare by Director. 10 years old. 
Both well bred on dam side. For further particu- 
lars address B. & S. office. 



BLOODED LIVE STOCK SHIPMENT. 

T PURPOSE TO GO EAST ABOUT AUGUST 
x 1st and return in September. Shall bring back 
Cattle and Sheep, or anything in live stock. Will 
purchase, or freight through. This will be your 
chance for direct shipment with attention. 

ROLL1X PETER SAXE, 
Importer and Exporter of Blooded Live Stock, 
513 Thirty-second St., Oakland. 



Mark Levy & Co. 



MARK LEVY 
E*p«rl Cutttr 
and Fitter. . . 
Fine Suits 
from 

125.00 up 




Only the 
Best Help 
Employed... 
All work 
done on the 



3oGciry St.. $. F. Rooms 19-20 Phone Crent 158 




SAN JOSE RACE TRACK. 

Beginning Feb. 1st. until further notice. 



Terms for the Season $100 (With usual return pr ivi 'eges). 

IjgrAII Bills Must Be Paid Before the Removal of the Mare. 

Good pasturage for mares at $4 per month. For further particulars, address 

33 Magnolia Avenue. San Jose. Cal. Tel. Green 393. C. A. DURFEE 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
1 24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

! The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
mercial school on the Pacific Coast. 18,000 gradu- 
ates: 25 teachers: 80 typewriters; over 300 students 

' annually placed in positions. Send for catalogue. 

E. P. HEALD, President. 



1901 WOODLAND 1901 

Annual Fair and Race Meeting of Agricultural Association District No. 40, 

COMPRISING THE COUNTIES OF YOLO AND SACRAMENTO, 

AUGUST 26th TO 3 1st, INCLUSIVE. The Week Preceding the State Fair. 



ENTRANCE 



Guaranteed Stakes. 

FIVE PER CENT. 

TROTTING STAKES. 



Horses to be Named with Entry. 

TO CLOSE JULY 

PACING STAKES. 



29, 1901 



No. 1. Three Year Old Trotting 
No. 2. 
No. 3. 
No. 4. 
No. 5. 



$300 



2:12 Class 8500 

2:15 " $500 

2:20 M 8400 

2:30 " $400 



No. 6. 
No 7. 
No. 8. 
No. 9. 
No. 10. 



Free for All Pacing 
2:12 Class 

2:15 " 

2:20 

2:30 " 



$600 
$500 
$500 
$400 
$400 



No. 11. Road Race. Trotters and Pacers $300. 

Free for all Road Horses owned and used as such by residents of the District. To be eligible the horse must have been owned by the party making the entry on July 1, 1901, and must not be entered 

in any race other than a local or road race. The Directors reserve the right to reject any entry to this race. 
N. B. — Owners are respectfully asked to enter their horses in two classes and the Program will be arranged so that they ran start in both events. 
t. Owners of Runners, attention! One or morn it mining Events will be given Each Day, entries to close the Night Before the Race. 



Entries in the Stakes for named horses to close with the Secretary Monday, July SO, 1901. 

Eight entries required to till each Stake, but the Board of Directors reserve the right to hold the 
entries and declare the race filled with a less number and deduct a proportionate amount of the 
Stake 

Stake will be divided into four moneys: 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. 

5 per cent, of the amount of the Stake will be deducted from each money won. 

The Board of Directors reserve the right to declare two starters a walkover When only two start 
they may contest for the entrance money paid in, to be divided 66 a j per cent, to the first and 33>s per 
cent, to the second horse. A horse distancing the Held shall be entitled to first and fourth moneys 
only, and in no other case will a horse be entitled to more than one money. 

The Board of Directors reserve the right to change the hour and day of any race, except when it 
becomes necessary to ante-date a race, in which instance the nominators will receive three days' 
notice by mail to address of entry. 

Address all communications to the Secrclim 

A. C. STEVENS, President. 



CONDITIONS. 

The right reserved to declare off or postpone any or all races on account of weather or other 
sufficient cause. 

Entries not declared out at 5 o'clock p. m on the day preceding the race shall be required to start 
and declarations must be in writing and made at the office of the Secretary at the track. 

Racing colors must be named by 5 o'clock p. M. on the day preceding the race and must be worn 
on the track in all races. 

The Board of Directors reserve the right to start any heat after the fourth score regardless of the 
position of the horses. 

Hopples barred In trotting races, but will be permitted in pacing races. 
All Stakes are guaranteed for the amount offered, and for the amount offered only. 
Otherwise than as hererin specified the Rules of the National Trotting Association to govern. 



C. F. THOMAS, Secretary, Woodland, Cal. 




Send For Our Large Catalogue; Mailed Free 




Centrifugal Pumps 

We carry Gasoline Engines 1 V4, 2'/4 
5, 8 and 12 Horse Power 
*S»SEND FOR CATALOGUE 



Horse Power Irrigating Pump 



k LITTLE 

312-314 Market St., San Francisco 



Dealers and Jobbers in 

PUMPS 



For Hand, Windmill, Irrigating, 
Spraying, Ship, Road, Wine, 
Whitewashing, Fire Purposes, 
Power Purposes, Air Purposes, 
Pumps for every conceivable use 
and for all depths of wells. 




We have the 
GEM with 
Graphite Boxes 
Never requiring 
Oiling 



Gasoline Engines, 

Windmills, Tanks, 

Horse Powers, Road Pumps, Hose, ,. , , _ ,. _ . 
Brass Goods, Pipe Fittings, Tools, WeiJSteP baSOlllie tflfjlfie S 
Lawn /lowers, IRON PIPE, etc., etc. ijj, 2%, 5, 9, 12 Horse Power. 



July 20, 1901] 



13 



TRACK 
HARNESS 



•♦.» 

I 
I 



The O. K. TRACK HARNESS is the Best Looking, Lightest and 
Strongest for the money. All Important Parts Lined with Raw- 
hide, r lexible Saddle, with Breast Collar and Breeching, or Two 
Minute Attachment Any style Reins Your choice of Bits. Hand 
made. Can't be beat. Price, - $40.00 



The Finest LAMB'S WOOL COOLER, 84x90, $5,00 \ Tweed's Celebrated Liniment, $5 per gallon 

The Best Wool SWEAT BLANKETS, extra large, $7,50 Sole Agents for { Prof. Robiquet's Liniment, $1, $3 and $5 per bottle 

The Lightest and Best Rawhide Steel-spring HOPPLE $10.00 [ 0. K. Paste, £. r .<.s.^ 



We are Headquarters 

for Everything 1 in the Horse Goods line. 



J. O'KANE 



10 WARREN ST. 
NEW YORK. 



Write for Catalogue. 



26-28 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



§ 



TRACK 
HARNESS 



FIRST ANNUAL MEETING 

OF THE 

Santa Rosa Racing Association 



-AT THE- 



SANTA ROSA RACE TRACK 

SIX DAYS, August 12 to 17, 1901, inclusive. 

ENTRIES CLOSE SATURDAY, AUG. 3, 1901 

Two or More Running Races Each Day, to Close Over Night. 

GUARANTEED STAKES FOR TROTTERS AND PACERS. 



TROTTING. 

HORSES TO BE NAMED WITH ENTRY. 



2:40 Class Trotting-, 
2:27 Class Trottina:, 
2:20 Class Trotting-, 
2:16 Class Trotting-, 
2:14 Class Trotting, 

P. H. QUINN, President. 



$500 
$400 
$400 
$450 
$500 



PACING. 



HORSES TO BE NAMED WITH ENTRY. 



2:30 Class Pacing, 
2:25 Class Pacing, 
2:20 Class Pacing, 
2:1*7 Class Pacing, 
2:12 Class Pacing, 



$400 
$500 
$400 
$450 
$500 



For Conditions see Entry Blanks. Address all communications to 

THOS. BONNER, Secretary, Santa Rosa, Cal. 



$8500 Guaranteed. 



Additional Stakes for Trotters and Pacers. 



$8500 Guaranteed. 



Los Angeles Fair and Race Meeting, 1901. 

DISTRICT AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION No. 6. 

Southern California's Great Racing Event. Thirteen Days-September 28 to October 12, 1901. 

GUARANTEED STAKES FOR TROTTERS AND PACERS. 



ENTRIES TO CLOSE SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1901, WHEN HORSES ARE TO BE NAMED AND ELIGIBLE. 



No. 19. 
No. 20. 
No. 21. 
No. 22. 
No. 23. 
No. 24. 



TROTTING STAKES. 

2:17 Class Trotting 

2:20 Class Trotting 

2:25 Class Trotting 

2:27 Class Trotting 

2:29 Class Trotting 

2:35 Class Trotting 



$700 



.$700 



PACING 

No. 25. 2:11 Class Pacing. 

No. 26. 2:16 Class Pacing. 

No. 27. 2:19 Class Pacing. 

No. 28. 2:21 Class Pacing 

No. 29. 2:23 Class Pacing. 

No. 30. 2:27 Class Pacing. 



STAKES. 



.$800 
.$700 
.$700 
.$700 
$700 
.$700 



The Conditions of these Races the same as the conditions contained in the advertisement of the " Los Angeles Fair and Race Meeting, 1901, " in the Breeder 
AND Sportsman, June 29, 1901. Send all communications to 



E. T, WRIGHT. President. 



F. G. TEED. Secretary, 226 S. Spring St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



11 



[July 20, 1901 



1901 CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR 1901 

Sacramento, Sept. 2d to Sept. 14th, inclusive. 

All Races to be Contested at the State Fair on Days to be Hereafter Designated by the Board of Directors. 

ENTRIES TO CLOSE WITH THE SECRETARY SATURDAY, JULY 27. 1901. 



TROTTING. 

No. 1. 2:40 Class, Trotting, S800. 

Any Horse entered in this class getting a record of 2:25 or better, prior to 
August 10th, not eligible to start, but his entry may be transferred to the 
2:20 class, and in the event of being entered in the 2:20 class, his entrance 
money will be refunded. 

No. 2. 2:20 Class, Trottinsr, $800. 
No. 3. 2:14 Class, Trotting:, $1000. 



PACING. 

No. 4, 2:25 Class, Pacing, $800. 

Any Horse entered in this class getting a record of 2:20 or better, prior to 
August 10th, not eligible to start, but his entry may be transferred to the 
2:17 class, and in the event of being entered in the 2:17 class, his entrance 
money will be refunded. 

No. 5. 2:17 Class, Pacing, $800. 
No. 6. 2:13 Class, Pacing:, $1000. 



No. 7. Stake for 3 Year Old Pacers. 



for Colts- 

No. 8. Stake for 4: Year Old Green Pacers. 



$10 entrance; $20 additional for starters; $250 added. Starters to be 
named through tho entry box 5 P. M. day before race. All moneys to be 
divided 60,°£, 30°o and 10.° '. No deductions from money winners. 



$10 entrance; $20 additional for starters; $250 added. Starters to be 
named through tho entry box 5 P. M. day before race. All moneys to be 
divided 60°„', 30% and 10%. No deductions from money winners. 



No. 9. Stake for 4 Year Old Green Trotters. 

$10 entrance; $20 additional for starters; $250 added. Starters to be named 
through tho entry box 5 P. Id day before the race. All moneys to be 
divided 60%, 30% and 10%. 

SPECIAL CONDITIONS, 



Entries to the above Dine Races to close with the Secretary, Geo. W. Jackson, Sacramento, 
Saturday, July 29, 1901. when horses are to be named and eligible. 

Five per cent entrance and Ave per cent additional from money winners, excepting in stakes 
7, 8 and 9, where no deductions are made from money winners, and nominators only hold for $10 
entrance fee. All races mile heats, three in five. 



Moneys to be divided S0"i, 25"i, 15% and 10%, unless otherwise specified in conditions. 
All Races to 1111 satisfactory to the Board of Directors or they may be declared off. 
Distance in all heats HO yards, but if the field is more than eight, 100 yards. A horse not 
winning (or making a dead heat) in three to be ruled out. 
For further conditions, see entry blank. 



The balance of Harness Races to provide a Program of Twenty-four Races, with special races for Roadsters owned by 
members of organized Driving Clubs, open to the State, and a Double Team Race; particulars and conditions to be announced 
August 10, 1901. 

Otherwise than as herein specified, National Trotting Association Rules to govern. 



GEO. W. JACKSON, Secretary. 



A. B. SPRECKELS. President. 



SPECIAL: Owing to deniitnd for stabling, the Society will only provide stalls for horses entered in races. Special stalls for horses shown for premium*. 



SPOKANE INTERSTATE FAIR. 

SPOKANE, WASH. 

SEPTEMBER 10TH TO 21ST INCLUSIVE. 



$10,000 
I N PURSES. 



$10,000 
IN PURSES. 



The ROYAL ITALIAN BAND, one of the Greatest Musical Organizations in the country, has been 

secured at a cost of $5500. 



Entries to Harness Events close July 25, 1 90 1 . 



Entries to Running Races close on Night Before Race at 6 o'clock. 



SEPTEMBER 10— TUESDAY. 
Stock Parade. 1:30 P. M. sharp. 

No. 1— Two-year-old Pacing 8300 

No. 2—2:32 Class Pacing 400 

No. 3— Banning. Hair-mile dash. Handicap 150 

No. 4— Running. One mile dash. Selling. 8600. 

Weight for age. Five pounds oil' for each 

8100 down to 8200 250 

SEPTEMBER 1 1— WEDNESDAY. 

No. 5—2:30 Class Pacing ' 8400 

No. 6—2:30 Class Trotting 400 

No. 7— Running. Five-eights mile dash. Handicap. 

Two years old 150 

No. 8— Hurdle Race. One and one-fourth miles. 

Four hurdles. Handicap 400 

SEPTEMBER 12— THURSDAY. 

No. 9-2:20 Class Trotting 81000 

No. TO— 2 :50 Class Pacing 250 

No. 11 — Running. Half mile and repeat Selling, 
840O. Weight for age. Five pounds off 

for each 8100 down to si no 200 

No. 12 — Running. One mile dash. Handicap 250 



Entrance Pee, 5% of purse and 5% additional from money winners. 

Entrance to Harness Races payable at time of entry. Two horses may be entered from the same 
Stable in the same class and held but for one entry; horse to be named the day before the race. Money 
lo be divided as follows in harness races: 50%, 25%, 15% and 10%. Mile heats 3 in 5. except Nos. L 13, 
1 3 and 25, which are 2 in 3. Money in running races to be divided: 70%, 20% and 10%. 

Hopples ara net barred. The Board reserves the right to declare oil and return entrance fee in 



SEPTEMBER 1 3— FRIDAY. 

No. 13— Two-year-old Trot 8400 

No. 14— Three-year-old and under. Trotting 3O0 

No. 15— Running. Seven-eighths mile dash. Sell- 
ing, 8400. Weight for age. Five pounds 

off for each 8100 down to 8100 200 

No. 16— Running. Three-eighths mile dash. Han- 
dicap 150 

SEPTEMBER 14— SATURDAY. 

No. 17—2:17 Class Trotting 8600 

No. 1 8— Gentlemen's Driving Race to wagon. 
Owners to drive. Trotters eligible to 2:35 

class. First prize Cup 

Second prize Lap robe 

Third Prize Whip 

No, 19— Running. Spokane Derby. One and one- 
half miles for three-year-olds 5O0 

No. 20— Running. Half mile and repeat. Handicap. 200 

SEPTEMBER 16— MONDAY. 
No. 2 1— Gentlemen's Driving Race to wagon. 

Owners to drive. Pacers eligible to 2:30 

class. First prize Cup 

Second prize Lap robe 

Third prize Whip 

CONDITIONS. 



No. 22— Free for all. Slow race. Mile dash 850 

No 23 — Newsboys' Race. Half mile dash 25 

SEPTEMBER 17— TUESDAY. 

No. 24—3:35 Class Trot 8300 

No. 25— Three-year-old Pacing 250 

No. 26— Special Indian Race 100 

SEPTEMBER 18— WEDNESDAY. 

No. 2 7— Free-for-all Trotting 8500 

No. 28— 2:24 Cla-s Trot 400 

No. 29 — Running. Half mile dash. Washington 
and Idaho horses, owned In these States 

January 1, 1901 175 

No. 30— Running. Quarter mile dash. Weight 

for age 100 

SEPTEMBER 19— THURSDAY. 



31—2:15 Class Pace 81000 

250 



No. 

No. 32—2:50 Class Trot 

No. 33— Running. Three-fourths mile dash. Han- 
dicap 800 

No. 34-Running. Half mile dash. Horses owned 

in Spokane County, Jan. 1, 1901 150 



any purse that does not fill satisfactorily. A horse distancing the field is entitled to first and fourth 
monies only, and in no other case will a horse be entitled to more than one money. The usual weather 
clase will be observed. 

Other than specified, the rules of the National Trotting Association will govern. The rules of 

the California Jockey Club will govern the running races. 



For Entry Blanks, address H. BOLSTER, Secretary, Spokane, Wash. 



Or BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, San Francisco, Cal. 



July 20, 1901] 



15 



KENNEL ADVERTISEMENTS 



hill Cocker Kennels 

San Anselmo, Cal. 



Young Stock, Black and 
Red, always on hand. 



POINTER 

FOR SALE. 



A bitch, two years old, well broken and good dis- 
position. Fine looker, lemon and white. 
For particulars address OWNER, 

Care of Breeder and Sportsman. 



AT STUD 



CUBA OF KENWOOD 

(Qlenbeigh Jr.— Stella) 

SAM'S BOW 

(Plain Sam— D)lly Dee II) 

STOGKDALE KENNELS 

K. M. DODGE, Manager, 
Baker«8eld, Kern Co., 

Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken 
Dogs for sale. 



BOOK ON 



Dog Diseases 

AND 

~sjv to Peed 

Mailed Free to anr address hv the anthot 
H. Ot,at Gloveb, D V. 8., 1293»»oadway 
New York. 

GORDON SETTER PUPPIES 

FOR SALE. Thoroughbreds by a son of Dick III, 
winner at four bench shows in this city— out of 
Mirza, winner at May Show, 1893. 
Address Owner 1950 Grove St., Oakland, Cal. 




EDfe ^DOGSWITH MANGE 

gTOCURl TMEM WITH .STANDARD OIL OF TAR, 

TNDfOR ClRCUUUf.VTE VMMONIALA AND FTttf SAMPIE 

.STANDARD DISINFECTANT CO Clcvfland O 



The Breeder and Sportsman is 
Agent for the following publications on 
THE DOG: 



KENNEL SECRETS, 
Ashmont, 

Price, postpaid, S3.00. 



The most exhaustive 
treatise on The Dog 

bv Ashmont, lowing the instruc- 
tions contained in this 
volume, even a novice 
can manage a kennel, 
breed and exhibit Dogs as scientifically as a vet- 
eran at the business. It contains 348 pages, is 
beautifully bound in cloth, and has 150 exquis- 
ite half-tones of the most celebrated Dogs of the 
various breeds of the present day. 

Anyone securing FIVE new yearly subscrip- 
tions to the BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 
(S3 each) and forwarding the cash to this 
office will at once be sent this valuable book as a 
premium. 



DISEASES OF DOGS 
by Ashmont, 

Price, postpaid, S2.00. 



This standard work 
is invaluable to 
every owner of a 
good Dog. It gives 
you a knowledge of 
what disease your 
faithful canine 
friend is affected with and how to quickly cure 
tke same. There are 213 pages in this volume. 

Anyone securing THREE new yearly sub- 
scriptions to the BREEDER AND SPORTS- 
MAN (S3 each) and forwarding the cash to 
this office will at once be sent this more than 
Useful work as a premium. 



FETCH AND CARRY, by Waters. 

Price, postpaid, SI. 50. 

With the aid of this book anyone with ordinary 
intelligence can easily teach a Dog to retrieve in 
fine style. Every duck hunter should own a copy 
of this. The work contains 124 pages and is 
bound in cloth. 

Anyone securing THREE new yearly sub- 
scriptions to the BREEDER AND SPORTS- 
MAN (S3 each) and forwarding the cash to 
this office will at once be sent one of theso vol- 
umes as a premium. 



MODERN TRAINING 
AND HANDLING,,,, 



by Waters. 



Price, postpaid, S2.00. 

- This is universally conceded to be far and away 
the best work on the subject ever published in 
any country. Dog fanciers everywhere recommend 
it. Anyone securing THREE iic» yearly sub- 
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this office will at once be sent this really great 
work on training and handling dogs as a pre- 
mium. It contains 332 pages and is neatly 
bound in cloth. 



PRINCIPLES OF 
DOG TRAINING, 



by Ashmont. 



Price, postpaid, 50 fi nis. 

The above-mentioned work is by one of the most 
thoroughly posted writers on the Dog in the world 
and is worth its weight in gold for the field, etc. 
It contains 61 pages and is bound In cloth. 

Anyone securing TWO new yearly subscrip- 
tions to the BREKDER AND SPORTSMAN 
(S3 each) and forwarding the cash to this 
office will be at once sent this clever work as a 
premium. 



Palace Hotel 



In placing these two hotels 
under one management and 
joining them with a covered 
passageway, the purpose was 
to provide guests with com- 
forts and conveniences not 
obtainable in any other hotel 
in the West. And the plan 
is a success. 

AMERICAN PLAN EUROPEAN PLAN 



Grand Hotel 




California irttaiarii By. 

LESSEE OF 

San Francisco & North Pacific Ry 
The Picturesque Route 

OF CALIFORNIA. 

The Finest Hunting and Fishing in California . 

NUMEROUS RESORTS. 

Mineral Springs, Hot and Cold. 

HEALTH 

PLEASURE 

RECREATION 

The Section for Fruit Farms and Stock 
Breeding, 

THE route to 

San Rafael, Petaluma 

Santa Rosa, Ukiah 

And other beautiful towns. 
THE BEST CAMPING GROUNDS ON 
THE COAS T. 

Ticket Office— Corner New Montgomery and 
Market streets, under Palace Hotel. 
General Office— Mutual Life Building. 

R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 



THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 

Imp. Hackney Stallion 
Green's Kufus 63 < 4291 > 

Will serve a limited number of approved mares season 1901. 

FEE - $75 
Reductions made for two or more mares. 



You Can't Cut Oul 

A BOG SPAVIN ok 
THOROUGH PIN, but 

ABSORBINE 

will clean them off, and you 
work tlie horse same time. 
iJoes not blister or remove the 
hair. Will tell you more ii 
you write. $2.00 per bottle, 
delivered. 

W.F.YOUNG, P. D. R, 

Springfield. Mass. 

For sale by Mack&Co., I»angley'&MlchaelsCo., 
Redington & Co , J. O'Kane, and J. A. McKorron, 
all of Shu Francisco. 




DUNLAP HOTEL 



H. H DUNLAP 

(Prop.) 
conducted on 



American 




Plan 



Rates: 
S2 to 1814 per Day 



240 O'Farrell St., 
San Franoisco. 



CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR FOR 1901. 
SACRAMENTO 

SEPTEMBER 2nd TO 14=th, INCLUSIVE. 

ENTRIES TO CLOSE SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1901. 

All Races to be contested at the State Fair on days to be here- 
after designated by the Board of Directors. 



The following Running Stakes will close August 3, 1901, with the Secretary. 
Remainder of Running Program, for which Liberal Purses will be given, will be 
announced September 1st, and will provide for four or more Running Races each day: 

Flfl%h ^tflkp lr ° r Ages. Entrance SIO, to accompany nomination; $20 addi- 
1 laSIl olalw. tional for horses not declared by 4 P. M. the day preceding the race: $400 
added by the Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third. Non-winners of three races this year, if 
three year olds and over, five pounds; non-winners of two races, seven pounds; and non-winners of one 
race, ten pounds. Maidens, three years old allowed five pounds; four years old and over, seven pounds 
additional. Six Furlongs. 

Th*» ^haiipr <i^llin(r ^tsiLp For Two Year Olds. Entrance 810, to accom- 
1I1C Olldlltl veiling OlctrvC. pany nomination; $15 additional for colts not de- 
clared by 4 p. m. day preceding race; with $300 added by the Society, of which $50 to second and $25 to 
third. Horses may be entered not to be sold, and carry rule weight. If entered to be sold for $1000, 
allowed three pounds; $700, six pounds; $400, ten pounds. Winners of one race after closing of stake to 
carry three pounds extra; of two or more, seven pounds extra. Maidens beaten three times, allowed 
five pounds; four or more, seven pounds. Value to be placed on starters through entry box by 4 p. m. 
day before race. Six Furlongs. 

Sacramento State Fair Selling Stake. wrrd^EnJa^e^^acc^m-- 

pany nomination; $20 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. M. the day preceding the race: $400 
added by the Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third. Winner to be sold at auction. If for 
$2000 to carry rule weight; if for less, one pound allowed on each $100 to $1000, thence two pounds for 
each $100 to $400. Selling price to be placed on starters through entry box by 4 p. M. on the day pre- 
ceding the race. A winner of a stake race or three or more races of any value after dosing of stake, 
to carry five pounds extra. Maidens allowed seven pounds. One Mile. 

For Three Year Olds and upwards. Entrance 810, to 
accompany nomination; $20 additional for horses not declared by 
4 p. M. day preceding race; with $400 added by the Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third. 
Stake to be named after winner if Vinctor's time (1:40) is beaten. A non-winner of a stake race in 
1901, or a race of the value of $500, allowed, if a non-winner of five races other than selling races, five 
pounds. Maidens seven pounds additional. One mile. 

For Two Year Old Fillies Entrance SIO, to accompany 
nomination; $15 additional if not declared by 4 p. m. the day pre- 
ceding the race; $300 added by the Society, of which $50 to second and $25 to third. Weights Ave 
pounds below the scale. A winner of a stake race in 1901, or a winner of three or more races of any 
value, other than selling races, five pounds extra. Non-winners of two races allowed four pounds. 
Maidens allowed seven pounds, and if such are the produce of a mare that has not produced a winner 
at the time of starting, ten pounds. Maidens beaten three or more times since closing of the stake, 
allowed five pounds, and if not placed second or third, seven pounds additional. Five furlongs. 

A Handicap for Three Year Olda and upwards. 
Entrance SIO, to accompany nomination, with $20 addi- 
tional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. day preceding race; with $400 added by the Sooiety, of which 
$70 to second and $30 to third. Weights posted at 12 M. day preceding race. A winner of a race other 
than a selling race, after the weights are published, to carry five pounds extra. One mile and a 
furlong. 

The California State Fair Annual Stake. ^"^X*.' 8 T r ? 

company nomination; $20 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. the day preoeding the race; 
with $500 added by the Society, of which $100 to second and $50 to third. Weights posted by 12 m. day 
preceding race. A winner of a race, other than a selling race, after the weights are published, to 
carry five pounds extra. Six furlongs. 

A Handicap for Three Year Olds and Upwards. 
Entrance S15, to accompany nomination; with $25 addi- 
tional for horses not declared by 4 p. M. day preceding race; $500 added by the Society, of which $10q 
to second and $50 to third. Weights posted by 12 m. day before race. A winner of a race other than a 
selling purse, after the weights are published, to carry five pounds extra. One and one-quarter miles. 

The State Agricultural Society's rules to govern except where conditions are otherwise. All 
declarations and claims for allowances due at 4 p. m. day preceding race, unless otherwise specified 
in conditions. Owners and trainers will be held responsible for same. Entrance and declaration 
money to go to winner. No added money for less than four starters in different interests. In selling 
races, beaten horses not liable to claim. Right to use starting gate is reserved. 

Entries must state name, color, sex and pedigree of the horse, with raoing colors of the owner. 



The Vinctor Stake. 



Sunny Slope Stake. 



The Governor's Stake. 



The President's Stake. 



GEO. W. JACKSON, Secretary California State 
Agricultural Society, Sacramento, Cal. 



A. B. SPRECKELS, President. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



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2 



[July 27, 1901 



|| JOTTINGS. 



THE CALIFORNIA CIRCUIT will open at Sacra- 
mento next Tuesday with the five days meeting 
of the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Associa- 
tion. Seldom has as good a program been offered for 
an opening day. There are two purses of $1000 each, 
down for decision, either one of which should furnish 
sport worth going a long way to see. The 2:40 class 
trot has twelve entries and there will probably be at 
least eight borses score up for the word and perhaps ten 
will be ready to face the starter. Among those that 
have been showing speed sufficient to have them spoken 
of as probable winners are C. F. Bunch's entry Nora 
McKinney, Walter Maben's Doctor Mac, A. G. Gurnott's 
gray gelding What Is It by Direct out of tho dam of 
Who Is It, Albert Joseph's chestnut mare Floradora 
by Sable Steinwav, Dr. F. Oglesby's Almonada by 
Eros, and P. H. Quinn's Black Bart by Robin. I do 
not expect from the best information of these horses I 
can get, to see many heats below 2:18, but I think the 
race will be trotted around that mark, perhaps a 
couple of heats a shade faster and I also expect to see 
split heats. If any horse trots in 2:15 or better, I look 
to see him win in straight heats. The 2:25 pace is 
about the best matched lot of green ones that have 
started in the slow pace here for years. Among those 
that have shown race horse speed are Enoch by Sid- 
more, Bankers Daughter by Arthur Wilkes. Direct C, 
by Direct, Sandowdy Dietatus, Sir Albert S. by Diablo, 
Montanic by Chohalis, Rita II. by McKinney and Ad- 
vertisor by Advertiser. All these have worked mile s 
around 2:15 and the heats will be paced in that time or 
better in all probability. It is the fellow that can go 
three heats in that time that can win in my opinion. 
No better looking lot of trotters and pacers ever lined 
up for the word in California than the horses that will 
start in these two races on Tuesday, and the person 
that can pick the winner will be able to carry home 
quite a pocket full of money if he is willing to back his 
choice. There will be good odds to be had on every 
horse that starts. 

On the last day of the Windsor meeting there were 
five starters in the 2:18 pace, ono of them being the 
California Cicero, James Thompson, with the three 
year old pacer Thornway by Steinway. Fleety was 
the favorite and won the second, third and fourth 
heats in 2:13 or better, but the first heat was won by 
tho mare Manzanilla in the slow time of 2:19J. It was 
so evident that the other four horses were pulled to 
permit Manzanilla to win that the judges fined their 
drivers $25 each. Thompson's speech in his effort to 
escape the fine was probably the oratorical effort of 
his life, but it had no effect. The fino went. 



The suggestion is hereby respectfully made to the 
officials of the district fair associations of California 
that more attention bo paid this year to the comfort of 
those who pay at the gate to see the races. Dust is 
one of the greatest annoyances at California race 
tracks owing to the fact that from May to November 
but very little if any rain falls, and summer showers 
are unknown. While it is not within the power of 
district boards to produce rain, they can cause a great 
deal of the dust to be effectually laid with the aid of 
sprinkling wagons. Money spent in this way is about 
the best advertising a board of directors can do, and 
will do much to increase the attendance. The mana 
gers of the running tracks here and in the East under, 
stand this and by laying out lawns, planting trees and 
shrubbery and beautifying the grounds in every pos- 
sible manner, add to the enjoyment of a day spent at 
the track and by keeping down the dust enable the 
ladies and their escorts to appear in attractive dross 
without the danger of ruining their clothes. By a 
generous sprinkling of the roads leading to the tracks 
and also that portion of tho infield where the rigs of 
those who drive out are permitted to stand, the dust 
nuisance can be materially assuaged, and if the sprink- 
ling could be extended to all portions of the grounds 
used by the crowd, the race tracks would bo much 
more popular than they are now. It is almost out of 
the question to have lawns of blue grass of any extent 
at the California country tracks as the expense for 
water would be too great, but I offer the suggestion 
t.hatjawns of alfalfa could be laid down that would not 
only solve the problem of dust during a meeting, but 
be a source of profit during tho remainder of the year. 
Tho district association that can provide a clean grand 
stand and a course comparatively free from dust dur- 
ing a meeting, will have hit upon a plan that will bring 
in more dollars at the gate than they now think pos- 
sible to secure. 

A report comes from Cleveland that The Abbot 
2:03j and Lord Derby 2:07 are both sick and that 



neither can take his regular work. They are said to 
be suffering from the disease which has afflicted so 
many horses in the East and West this year and which 
resembles the epizootic. It would boa national calam- 
ity for the champion trotter and Lord Derby, a horse 
that has shown championship form, to be kept from 
the tracks this year 'iy sickness. Should The Abbot 
fail to meet Cresceus in the races already scheduled it 
would be a great disappointment to the entire trotting 
world. It is to be hoped that the illness of these two 
great horses is but slight and that they will speedily 
recover and be in perfect condition to meet their en- 
gagements. 

If the 2:25 pace, which is practically a race for green 
horses, were to be held on tho Grand Circuit this year 
with the same starters that will take the word at Sac- 
ramento next Tuesday, there would be a hundred 
thousand dollars in the pool box before it was over. 
I do not believe there is a horseman in California who 
has seen any of the horses that aro entered taking 
thoir work but expects it to bo one of the greatest 
races ever seen in the State. Last week an item in 
this paper stated that William G. Layng's pacer Sir 
Albert S. would probably be favorite. Since that just 
five trainers who have entries in the race have stated 
that they know they can beat Mr. Layng's horse and 
will buy all the tickets against him that they can pos- 
sibly dig up the money to pay for. A visitor to the 
Sacramento track told me yesterday that he had seen 
enough to convince him that there were at least a half 
dozen horses among those entered that will take a 
record of 2:15 unless tho horse that beats them makes 
faster time. He said he saw four of them pace miles 
from 2:11 to 2:14 last week, another that went the last 
half in 1:03 and still another that came a last quarter 
in 29j seconds. Now that is grand circuit speed, and 
where a half dozen are showing such form, it will only 
need a few men with money to back their opinions, to 
make the best betting races seen in California for 
years. There were horses in the Chamber of Com- 
merce at Detroit this year that could not win any part 
of the money in the 2:25 pace at Sacramento next Tues- 
day that were played for thousands. Of course Sacra- 
mento is not Detroit, but if there is such a revival of 
the interest in harness racing as is expected, pools will 
be hid on in a lively manner when the 2:40 trot and the 
2:25 pace are called next Tuesday and there will be 
four or five '"favorites" in each. 



American Trotter the 'Best. 



[N. Y. Sun, July 30.] 

A short time before the breaking out of the trouble 
with China three agents of the Japanese Government 
came to this city to buy American trotting mares and 
stallions for the purpose of improving the native brood 
of horses. They were B. Hirosawa, a special repre- 
sentative of the Imperial Government; N. Kunogi, 
director of the State stallion depot at Miyagi, and K. 
Tange, director of the State stallion depot at Iwate. 
A number of breeding establishments were visited, but 
before any purchases were made they were recalled by 
their government. Before leaving this city for San 
Francisco Mr. Hirosawa said that he was most favor- 
ably impressed by the quality of American bred horses 
and would return as soon as the Chinese trouble was 
settled and buy some of the best bred stock he could 
find. It had been his experience, as well as that of his 
colleagues, that the most satisfactory results were ob- 
tained by mingling the American trotting blood with 
that of the Japanese. 

"We have tried it,'' he said, "on a very small scale, 
it Is true, but the result has been so gratifying that 
our Government has decided to go into it more exten- 
sively. We have experimented with stallions and 
mares from ever country where horse breeding is a 
recognized industry, and have found that the Ameri- 
can trottor suits our purpose best." 

The Japanese have a system of encouraging horse 
breeding which in somo respects might be followed to 
advantage by this Government, as it would be espec- 
ially advantageous to those farmers and others whoso 
means do not permit them to breed to the best stallions. 
Mr. Tange said that his Government had established 
stallion depots and those who owned mares were free, 
in fact required, to take them there to be bred. At 
that time there were two stud farms, called shubabo- 
kujo, located at convenient points t hroughout tho Em- 
pire, and more would be established, as the Japanese 
were taking a deeper interest in horse breeding than 
ever before. Messrs. Hirosawa, Kunogi and Tange aro 
experienced horsemen and know a good animal when 
they see one. They are quick to detect any fault and 
are shrewd buyers. They returned to New York a 
few days ago and through the Fasig-Tipton Company 
went to the Village Farm last Saturday, whore they 
closed a contract for the purchase of fifteen head of 
royally bred mares and young stallions, as published 



in The Sun of yesterday. Following is a complete list 
of the animals bought: 

Waygrass, b f, foaled March, 1899, by Dare Devil- 
Rahway by Lord Russell. 

Alice Chimes, b m, foaled May, 189(>, by Chimes- 
Doris by Mambrino King. 

Bonnie Kate, br m, foaled March, 1898, by Mambrino 
King-Kate. 

American Princess, b m, foaled June, 1897, by Rex 
Americus-Rahway by Lord Russell. 

The Pirate, b s, foaled May, 1897, by Rex Americus- 
Floss by Almont, Jr. 

The Fanatic, b c, foaled May, 1899, by Chimes- 
Miriam Law by Heir-at-Law. 

The Defender, oh c, foaled July, 1898, by Mambrino 
King-Dottio by Almont, Jr. 

Euphony, b c, foaled February, 1900. by Rex Amer- 
icus-Duenna Chimes by Chimes. 

Exact, b c, foaled February, 1900, by Rex Americus- 
Janet by Mambrino King. 

Racket, b c, foaled May. 1900, by Mambrino King- 
Miss Clifford by Chimes. 

The Carlist, b c, foaled April, 1900, by The Pretender 
-Lena by Hamlin Patchen. 

The Doorkeeper, b c, foaled May 1900, by Mambrino 
King-Dorcas Chimes by Chimes. 

Chickering, a colt by Lord Regent, Lord Bright 
and Foss. 

The last three were not bred at Village Farm. Tho 
Japanese agents will return to this city to-morrow and 
it is probable they will buy a few more horses before 
returning to the Orient. The Fasig-Tipton Company 
would not give out tho price paid for the Village Farm 
lot, but it is stated to be in the neighborhood of 
$25,000. 

New Outlet for Horses. 

Another outlet has been supplied for the groat Ameri- 
can horse. Previous to the first day of the present 
month the Republic of Mexico imposed a duty of sev- 
eral dollars a head on all horses, mules and "similar 
beasts of burden," but on that day this duty was done 
away with and now all American horses and mules will 
enter Mexico free of duty. An exception has long been 
made in favor of pure bred breeding stock under regu- 
lations somewhat similar to those governing the United 
States customs in respect to such animals and also in 
favor of high class coach and carriage horses, of which 
none, practically speaking, have been produced in 
Mexico. It is easy enough to discover the reason why 
Mexico has placed horses on her free list. She is short 
of horses like her greater sister on the North, and 
horses she must have not only for military purposes, 
but for the ordinary civilian walks of life. The fact 
is, that Mexico has not horses enough in any one de- 
partment of her business. Her cattlemen have not 
enough; of high class harness horses she has hardly 
any at all; of truck and business horses the supply is 
woefully inadequate. Her merchants and haciendados 
must have horses. Then Mexico is extraordinarily 
prosperous. Immense amounts of foreign capital are 
being poured into her banks, mercantile houses, mines 
and fields. Her exports are increasing. Only her 
luxuries are imported and they are well covered with 
a high tariff. All her poorer people need to eat and 
wear comes from her own soils, but with all her pros- 
perity she needs horses. Therefore, another market 
is opened to American horse breeders and what is 
more, a market where the less valuable grades of our 
horses will be wanted. We can well afford to part with 
many of the horses Mexico will buy in the next few 
years. — Breeders' Gazette. 

English Care of Horses. 

An English groom who spent twenty years in the 
stables of royalty thus spoke of the way we treat 
horses in America and the way they are treated in 
England: "You, " he said, "do not take good care of 
your horses. You think you do, but you do not. 
When a horse comes in all wet with perspiration you 
let him stand in the stable and dry with all the dirt on. 
In England wo take the horse as he comes in from a 
drive and sprinkle blood-warm water all over it from 
head to feet. Then we scrape it down and blanket it, 
rubbing tho legs and face dry. Thus, in an hour it is 
clean and dry and ready to take a good feed, while by 
your way the animal will stand and swelter for hours 
and finally dry sticky and dirty. Our horses never 
founder and never take cold. We never use a curry 
comb. You scratch your horses too hard. The only 
care necessary is to have the water not very cold, then 
bathe them quick and blanket them instantly, while 
rubbing their legs." 

Petaluma road drivers are contemplating the forma- 
tion of a driving club, leasing the historical old track 
and fair grounds and holding amateur meetings and 
probably race meetings once or twice a year. The 
Petaluma track has been the scene of some of tho 
greatest harness racing over seen in California. 



July 27, 1901] 



8 



Helena, Montana, Correspondence. 

Helena (Mont.), July 16, 1901. 

Breeder and Sportsman:— Since leaving Cali. 
fornia on June 12th, I have been doing business in 
Helena, and, of course, had to get up a little horse in- 
formation for you. 

The Helena Racing Association has recently been 
formed, and Helena is again in line with a seven days- 
program and ten thousand dollars in purses; races to 
take place in September after the Butte meeting is 
over. 

Mr. Walter Parks has taken charge of the race track 
and grounds and Mr. Parks certainly is taking great 
pains to make the track fast, and he knows how. 

Since coming here there has been quite a lot of in- 
terest taken in harness horses and the track and 
grounds look quite lively once more. 

Mr. J. J. Kelley has his horse Wakefield 2:16 in 
charge of Mr. Pat O. Rice. This pacer starts to-day 
at Butte in the 2:16 pace. Mr. Rice also has J. S. 2:30, 
a pacer, and a green horso by Simmons out of a famous 
race mare that Splan raced, whose name I now forget. 
This horse is a trotting wonder. 

Mr. Walter Parks has a few very tine horses in his 
stable. George Ayres 2:16, pacer, by Bay Bird, heads 
his list; Major Puff by Bay Bird, dam Pattie Puff, dam 
of Dr. Puff, is a green one, but he steps a quarter in 
32 seconds like a veteran, and he is 16 hands high, 
weighs 1150 lbs. and no pacer has a license to beat him. 
Parks has a mare named Dot by Bay Bird, dam by 
George Wilkes; this mare is also a green one, and she 
can trot a mile quite handily in 2:20. She is as sweet 
a going trotter as ever lived and great things are ex- 
pected of her in Mr. Parks' hands. He has a green 
horse by Simmons that Sam Pyle sold to a Mr. Dillon, 
and this horse is for sure a trotter that is causing a lot 
of comment. He is as speedy as anyone might wish 
for and a good actor. His dam is by Strathmore. 

James Misner, the veteran trainer from Portland, is 
here with three horses, viz: Florence M., a sorrel mare 
by Hambletonian Wilkes, dam Anna Belle 2:27 by- 
Dawn 2:18]; this Ally recently came from California, 
and her photograph will show that she is a beauty, 
and for a green trotter she is all that can bo asked for; 
she stepped one-quarter in 37 seconds recently and Mis- 
ner says she will be as good as Phoebe Wilkes ever was. 
She is a full sister to Robert I., the pacer that caused 
Tags to pace in 2:L3 at Tanforan last fall, and Maud Mur- 
ray, who trotted in 2:12 in Germany; she is a good be- 
havor. The pacing mare Little Maid 2:18 by Rockwood, 
dam by Hambletonian Mambrino, in Misner's stable, 
is stepping along somo. She stepped an easy mile in 
2:23 recently and quarters in 32 seconds. This mare 
is getting a slow preparation and is entered at Los 
Angeles this fall. She will render a good account of 
herself when she gets to the city of Los Angeles. Her 
four year old son, Printer's Ink by Altamont, is a 
trotter, and Misner predicts a race horse in him. He 
certainly looks like one and acts that way. His dam 
is one of the most perfect actors imaginable. 

Bourbon Wilkes Jr. 2:12£ is here. His owner, Mr. 
Fisher, expects to start him in the free for all this fall, 
and with George Ayres and Bourbon it will be an in- 
teresting event. 

There are more first class horses pulling buggies in 
Helona than any town T ever saw. Horses from such 
sires as Ben Lomond, Gold by Director, Bishop, Ken- 
tucky Volunteer, Ranchero, Bay Bird, Simmons and 
a host of speed producers 

The gentlemen who are at the head of the new rac- 
ing association aro all good men and in earnest, and I 
look for a first class meeting, and it will b'e a great 
benefit to horsemen here. The stables at the track 
are in good shape, good water, plenty of grass, shade 
trees, etc., and horsemen coming here will be assured 
of first class treatment. 

Mr. L. A. Walker, whom I succeeded as manager of 
the Helena Hotel, is the president of the association; 
he is also the superintendent of the U. S. Assay Offico 
here and is sure to suit every horseman. 

p, s. — Wakefield won first heat in the 2:16 pace at 
Butte to-day in 2:13A, Jim Dixon winning the race in 
the three following heats: time, 2:16, 2:20, 2:15. 

To a man up a tree it looks as though it should have 
been Wakofield's race in straight heats, even if Jim 
Dixon is touted as being unbeatable Frank Frazier 
is winning bunches of money at Butte and an occasional 
good race. He drove Hassalo to-day and also drives 
Mt. Hood. Yours truly, 

Clinton A. Harhison. 



Detroit Summaries. 



During the past two days there has been consider- 
able talk among lovers of fast horses of a three days' 
racing program to be given early in September. It is 
a fact that in and about Chico are many buggy horses 
that if entered in the various evonts, would give some 
very interesting exhibitions of speed. It is stated that 
three afternoons' racing could be provided for by the 
expenditure of a little money, and would, in a measure, 
take the place of the "race meeting" which wo are not 
to have this year.. — Chico Record. 



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5 ds 
11 dr 

9 ds 
ds 
ds 



July 15 —Hotel Cadillac Stake, $2500; 2:14 class, trotting. 

Lady Thisbe, blk m by Milroi (Kinney) 3 2 1! 

Dr. Book, b g by McKinney (Durfee) 113 3 

Palm Leaf, b g by Onward (McCarthy) 5 3 

Axtello, b g by Axtell (Marsh) 8 5 

Graoie Onward, ch m by Onward (Macey) 6 4 

Belle Onward, b m by Onward (Jaruieson) 4 6 

Janice, b m by Wm. Harold (M.Sanders) 7 7 

Time— 2:1354, 2:1254, 2:1154, 2:11)4, 2:1154. 

Chamber of Commerce Stake, $5000; 2:24 pacing. 

Star Pugh, cu h by Tom Pugh (Lockwood) 1 1 1 

Harry Logan, ch g by Harry Gear (Boucher) 2 2 2 

Cballie Downing, ch m by Anderson Wilkes (Huston) 

Fred H., b g by Reflect (Hardin) 

J. C, b h by Beamta (Shipp) 

Mollie Knox, br m by Wilkie Knox (Russj 

King Willis, b h by Bright Bell (Jamieson) 

Plenty, b g by Superior (Kueebs) 

Myosotis, ch m by Allie Wilkes (Darnaby) 

Ed Bennett, b hby Shadeland-Onward (Johnson) 

Rajah, b g by Chas Derby (Thomson) 

Reckless, b g by Hyatt (Foote) 

Staunton Wilkes, ch h (McHenry) 

Time-2:0954, 2:1054, 2:1354. 

2:20 class, trotting, purse $1500. 

Ida Highwood, bmbvHighwood (Huston) x l 1 

All Right, b g by Enright (Atkinson) 1 2 2 

Sphinx Lassie, b m by Sphinx (Turner) 2 3 6 

EffleG. bm by Alfred G (Walker) 3 5 8 

Vic Sch'eller. br g by Hamb. Wilkes (Van Bokkelen) 1) 7 3 

Neighbor Girl, b m by Robert L (Jolly) 4 6 4 

Bow Rene, b g by Bow Bells (Lockwood i 7 4 5 

Pettigrew, b h by Kingward (F. Colby ) 6 8 7 

Jeaunette, gr m by Frank Burgess (McDonald) 5 9 ds 

Minka, ch m by Mincemeat (Ryan) 10 10 dr 

Onward Jr., ch h by Oumarch (Thomas) ds 

Time— 2:12)4. 2:13%, 2:13%. 

2:0ti class, pacing, purse $1500. 

Hetty G., b m by Egg Hot (McCoy) 1 1 

Riley B . b h by Happy Riley (Erwin) 6 2 

Edith W., b m by Ben Lomond Jr (Turner) 2 6 

Bonnie Direct, blk h by Direct (McHenry) 3 3 

Paul Revere, ru g by Brandon (Atkinson) g 4 

Dariel, b m bv Alexander (McDonald) 4 8 

Harry O., b g by Atlantic King (Bogash) 7 5 

Eyelet, gr m by Gambetta Wilkes (Kinney) 5 7 

Time— 2:0554, 2:06)4. 

July 16—2:20 pacing, purse $1500. 
Helen D , b m by Crafty-Maggie McDowell by Sidney 

(Mahoney) 1 1 1 

College Boy, b h by Wildbrino (McLachlan) 2 4 2 

Xava, ch m by Great Heart (McLane) 6 2 3 

Mississippi King, b h by Tennessee Wilkes . (Wickersham) 4 3 6 

Cousin Madge, blk m by Brown Hal (Benedict) 7 5 4 

Fred Pabst, blk g by Kassell (Tremaine) 5 6 5 

John H , b g by John R. Gentry (Munson) 3 ds 

Time— 2:1254, 2:1154, 2:13%. 



2:24 class, 



15 




3 




8 


4 


7 


9 


2 


3 


3 


5 


6 


4 


9 


4 


7 


13 


5 


in 


7 


11 


6 


6 


8 


12 


8 


9 


1 1 


12 


in 


11 


11 


12 


13 


HI 


U 


5 


ds 


13 


ds 





1 1 

2 2 

3 3 

4 5 

9 4 

5 7 

6 6 

7 11 

8 13 
13 8 
12 9 
11 10 

10 12 



Merchants and Manufacturers' Stake, $10,000, for 
trotting. 

Eleata, blk m by Dexter Prince-Elden by Nephew 

(Marsh) 

Country J., ch g by Jayhawker (Macey) 

Neva Simmons, b m by Simmons (Price) 

Iva Dee, b m by Onward (Thomas) 

Louise Jefferson, br m by Jefferson (McGuire) 

Poindexter, br h by Abbottsford (Gatcomb) 

Porto Rico, b h by Electrite (Johnson) 

A J. D. , b g by Anderson Wilkes (Houston) 

Alberta D., ch g by Viking Jr (Shilliuglaw) 

Quoddy Girl, b m by Domineer (Kelley) 

Algoneta, b m by Eros (H. Saunders) 

George Smith, b g by St Vincent (Weigal) 

John Hooper, ch g by L. H (Bristol) 

Ted, blk g by Norval (Agnew) 

Belle Kuser, b m by Colonel Kuser (Rites) 

Time-2:12, 2:11, 2:08%. 

2:16 class, pacing, purse $1500. 
Braden, b h by Brown Hal-Kate Braden by Bay Tom 

(Miller) 

Captain Potter, gr g by Artie Laytham (Erwin) 

C. F. W., blk h by Roscoo :(Higby) 

The Minister blk g by Muupr.t (Kivits) 

Winfleld Stratton, b h by Saraway (McGuire) 

Joelisco, gr g by Vernwood (Crimmins) 

Joan, blk m by Joe Patchen (Haws) 

Meda Medium, br m by Riley Medium (Hoffman) 

Hal Patchen, b h by Valentine (Sullivan) 

Jack Mont, b g by Kitemont (Greer) 

Guinette, b h by Gladstone ( McCune) 

Maiden Queen, ch m by Online (Munson) 

Hal Stockings, blk g by Fry's Brown Hal (Galliger) 

Time— 2:10'/ 2 , 2:12. 

2:08 class, trotting, purse $1500. 

Boralma, ch g by Boreal-Earalma by Earl (Gatcomb) 

The Monk, br g by Chimes (Noble) 

Kingmond, b g by King Darlington (Marshi 

Time-2:09!4, 2-.07H- 

July 17—2:17 class, trotting, Russell house purse $2500. 
Charley Mc, blk g bv McKinney, by Doncaster. (Durfee) 2 

Sybil H., ch m by Acmon (Colby) 3 

Al K., br h by Alcantarus (Turner) 4 

Belle Curry, ch m by Simmons (Marsh) 5 

Marique, ch h by Expedition (Kinney) 7 

Clara Kimble, b m by Harry Noble (Jamison) 6 

Metellas. blk h by Mambrino King (Shilliuglaw) 1 

Time-2:1254, 2:14%, 2:1454, 2:1554. 

2:14 class, pacing, Wayne hotel purse $2500. 
Dan Patch, br h by Joe Patchen-Helica, by Wilkesborry . . . 

(McHenry) 1 1 1 

Captain Sphinx, b g by Sphinx (Velie) 2 2 3 

Amorel, gr m by Don Pizzaro (McDonald) I 3 2 

Fred the. Kid, b h by Kassell (Tremaine) 3 4 4 

Lady All Right, ch m by Senator Rose (Roths) 5 5 5 

Time— 2:08)4, 2:08, 2:09%. 
Free for all pace, purse $2800, 

Anaconda, b g by Knight- by Algona (Trout) 2 1 1 

Coney, blk g by McKinney (McDowell) 1 2 3 

Connor, blk g by C. F. Clay (McDonald I 3 3 2 

Indiana, b g by King of Holla ire (McCarthy) 4 4 4 

Time— 2:02, 2:02%. 2:0354. 
2:10 class trotting, purse $1500. 
Dolly Dillon, b m by Sidney Dillon-Dolly, by Electioneer.... 

(McHenry) 1 1 

Satin Slippers, blk m by Delancy (Colby) 2 2 

King Chimos b g by Chimes . .. . (Davis) 4 3 

Stamboulette, b h by Stamboul (Van Bokkelen) 3 ds 

Phoebe Childers, b m by Sir Roderick (Lapham) ds 

Annie Burns, gr m by Bobby Burns (D. Wilson) ds 

Time— 2:11)4, 2:12%. 
July 18—2:27 class, trotting, purso $1500. 

Coxey, b g by Judge Cox (Spear) 4 2 3 1 1 1 

Mota Arthur, br m by King Arthur. . (Kuthford 

and Noble) K 1 1 8 8 3 

Springdale, br h by Kingmaker (D.Wilson) 1 6 7 2 6 2 

Vic Schellar br g by Hamb Wilkes 

' (Van Bokkelen) 2 7 2 4 4 ro 

Toledo Bee, ch g by Robt. McGregor. (Lockwood) 7 4 4 5 2 ro 

Betsy Ross, b m by Wilkes Boy (Nothaway) 3 5 8 3 5 ro 

Captain Bracken, b g by Earl Baltic (Erwin) 5 3 6 7 3 ro 

Lady Patchen, b m (Hignight) 6 8 5 6 7 ro 

Jurash, b g by Norcatur (Munson) ds 

Ruth Ardelia, b m by Tommy Wilkes. (McKenzio) ds 

The King, b g by Clay King (Marsh) ds 

Time— 2:16, 2:14%, 2:19, 2:16'/,, 2:17%, 2:20. 



6 2 3 

8 3 2 

9 4 ds 

2 ro 
1 ro 
5 ro 

3 ro 



2:09 class, pacing, purse $2500. 

Sphinx S., ch g by Sphinx (Spear) 9 6 2 9 1 1 1 

George, br g by Scarlet Wilkes. . . . (McKenney i 4 3 1 1 

Argetta. ch m by Greystone (Berry) 7 13 3 

Sidney Pointer, b h by Star Pointer. . (Moffat) 1 10 6 4 

Carmine b g by Symboleer (Frost) 3 2 7 5 

Arbuteskan, bh by Arbutus (H.James) 2 8 9 8 

White Hose, ch m by White Foot (Munson) 5 5 4 2 

Goshen Jim, b g by Moses S (Thompson) 6 9 8 7 

Rey Direct, blk h by Direct (Cecil) 3 7 10 10 ds 

Annie Thornton, bm by Happy Courier. (Miller) 10 4 5 6 7 ro 
Time-2:07M, 2:08%, 2:0854 , 2:12, 2:0954, 2:10%, 2:14%. 

Free for all trot, purse $2500. 

Cresceus, ch h by Robert McGregor (Ketcham) 1 

Charley Horr, br h by Alfred G (Kelley) 2 

Time— First heat : 0:3054, 1:02)4, 1:3554, 2:06%. 
Second heat: 0:30%, 1:02)4, 1:35, 2:05. 

July 19—2:24 class, pacing purse $1000 (C. of C. Consolation). 

Stanton Wilkes, ch s by Nutwood Wilkes (Donnelly) 1 K 

J. C , b s by Beamer (Shipp) 2 1 

King Willis, b h by Bright Bell (Jamison) 6 2 

Myosotis. ch m by Allie Wilkes (Darnaby) 3 3 

Fred H., b g by Reflect (Hardin) 8 5 

Plenty, b g by Superior (Kneebsl 5 7 

Mollie Knox, br m by Wilkie Knox (Russ) 7 4 

Reckless, b g by Hyatt (Foote) 4 dr 

Rajah, b g by Charles Derby (Thompson) ds 

Time— 2:1254, 2:16)4, 2:16)4. 

2:27 class, pacing, purse $1500. 

New Richmond, gr h by Brown Hal (Benedict) 5 111 

Carnot, blk h bv Lochinvar (Wickersham) 12 2 2 

Billy H . b h by Alex Dumas (Fisher) 4 3 3 4 

Dainty Queen, blk m by Peeler (Munson) 6 4 4 3 

John R. Potts, b g by EruesI B (Turner) 2 5 5ds 

Xava, ch m by Great Lane ....(McLane) 3 6 ds 

Unnamed, blk g by Advola (Cook) 7 7 ds 

James Alexander, b g by Baron Posey (Jamison) ds 

Time— 2:08%, 2:11, 2:09, 2:11%. 

2:11 class, pacing, purse $1500, 

Harold S, b g by Roadmaster (Proctor) 1 I I 

Pussy Willow, b m by Cibolo (Munson) 6 3 2 

Balmy L , br m. bg Bamboo (Turner) 7 2 3 

MajorMarshall.bg by Billy Wilkes (Myers) 2 5 6 

Laundry Boy, b g by Time Onward (Thomas) 3 6 8 

Kassell, br h by Dunton Wilkes (Tremaine) 4 4 7 

Martha Marshall, b m by Grand Marshal (McDowell) 5 7 5 

My Choice, eh g, by Nuttingham (Burns) 8 8 4 

Time— 2:09)4. 2:08, 2:10. 

2:24 class, trotting, purse $2000, M. and M. consolation. 

Belle Kuser, b m by Colonel Kuser (Rites) 

Porto Rico, b h by Electrite (Johnson) 

Poindexter, br h by Abbotsford (Gatcomb) 

Quoddy Girl, b m by Domineer (Kelley) 

Algoneta, b g by Eros (Sanders) 

Ted, blk g by Norval (Egnew) 

Iva Dee, b m by Onward (Thomas) 

John Hooper, ch g by L. H (Bristol) 

Time-2:11H, 2:14, 2:11%, 2:12)4. 

2:12 class, trotting, purse $1500. 

Cornelia Belle, bm by Onward (Kirby) 

Alice Barnes, b m by Election (Spear) 

Starmont, ch g by Earlmont (Gray) 

Phoebe Onward, b g by Shadeland Onward (Marsh) 

Maggie Anderson, b m by Anderson Wilkes (Noble) 

Woodford C, b g by Redfleld (Davis) 

Venus II. , b m by Cupid (Saunders) 

Time— 2:11%, 2:10%. 



5 2 

2 1 
1 5 

3 3 

6 4 

4 7 

7 6 

8 8 



1 I 

2 2 

3 3 

4 ro 

6 ro 
8 ro 

5 'TO 

7 ro 



1 1 

4 2 

2 5 

3 4 

5 3 

6 7 

7 7 



News From the North. 



[Portland Rural Spirit.] 

A. A. Wright of this city has bought from I. C. 
Mosher the black stallion Black Egypt 2:34 by Cceur 
d'Alene, out of Skeeters, and will likely use him on the 
road. 

W. F. Watson has bought the handsome driving 
stallion Woodmon 2:28] by Monon, son of Nutwood, 
and is using him on the speedway. Woodmon is a 
toppy fellow in harness and a hard one to curry on the 
road . • 

J. W. Tildon of Vancouver, Wash., will ship his 
stable of horses to Salem this week. He has about 10 
head, among them is Package 2:24}, May Tilden 2:27$, 
Nellie Coovert, three year old pacer; Hattie Holly, two 
year old trotter; Mack Gose, three year old pacer, and 
a very promising green trotter by Scarlet Letter. 

Since the announcement of the Spokane speed pro- 
gram quite an interest is being taken there in harness 
horses. The gentlemen's road race will bring out all 
the fast drivers of the city (we mean horses) and some 
skirmishing; is being done to buy a fast one or two 
from the outside. Thos. S. Griffith, who always takes 
much interest in racing, has sold his road mare Kate 
Cogswell to Frank W. Bronson, manager of the Dia- 
mond Ice Co., who will start her in the road race, 
while Mr. Griffith will start either Tattletale or Nancy 
Lee. Quite a number of trainers are located at Spo- 
kane now and others are coming. Among those hav- 
ing harness horses are: Lou Childs, L. B. Lindsley, 
Joe Huber, John Lance and L. D. Lott. 

Fred Brooker writes to the Rural Spirit as follows 
from Yakima: "Matt Williams is working the two Jim 
Wright green pacers, Daniel J. and Lady Pearl. They 
have both been miles in about 2:20. 

Bob Pryor is working Sam Bowers and Chester 
Abbott, both pacers entered in tho$1000 2:20 paco here. 
He also has several colt trotters and pacers. 

I am working the bay mare Diodine and the chestnut 
two year old Flaxie D., which Mr. D. M. Shanks and 
myself recently purchased from Dr. Powell Reeves. 
I am also working my stallion Sonator 2:26,L Ho 
recently went a half mile against a bicycle in a match 
race; time, 1:00. I am working him slow, but do not 
think his logs will stand it to race again, although wo 
shall try to give him a fast mark at fair time. There 
are also sovoral runners in training here." 

The best guess on the result of tho M. & M. at Detroit 
was made by the editor of tho American Home Breeder 
who wrote as follows: "It looks from a distance as 
though the contest may be botwoen Nova Simmons, 
Fleata, Iva Dee and Country Jay." That was a mighty 
good guess out of a field or fifteen horses, as the four 
named wore the ones in the money. They were placed 
in tho following order at the close of the race: Eleata, 
Country Jay, Nova Simmons and Iva Dee. 

According to official reports in 1900 running races 
were hold in 80 cities, whilo harnoss ovonts took place 
in 88!) places, with 200 extra mootings, making a total 
of 1089. 



4 



[July 27, 1901 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 

Turf and Sporting Authority ot the Pacific Coast, 

— OFFICE — 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O BOX 2300. 



Terms— One Year 93. Six Months Sl.Tft, Three Months 91 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Keixey, 36 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 

O. G. Tl'KKI & CO., Agents. Subscription and advertising. 

Salisbury Building, Melbourne, Australia 



San Francisco, Saturday, July 27, iqoi. 



Dates Claimed. 



BUTTE and ANACONDA June -.29-611 days 

EVERETT, Wash Sept. 9-15 

BOISE, Idaho (State Fair) -> Sept. 16-21 

CARSON CITY, Nev Sept. 22-28 

SALEM, Oregon (State Fair) Sept. 23-28 

NEW WESTMINSTER (Provincial Fair) Oct. 1-5 

LA GRANDE, Oregon Oct. 1-5 

THE DALLES, Oregon (District Fair) Oct. 1-5 

VANCOUVER, B. C Oct. 1-5 

LEWISTON. Idaho (Intor-State Fair) Oct. 7-12 

VICTORIA, B. C Oct. 7-12 

BAKER CITY, Oregon October 6-12 

SPOKANE, Wash Sept. 10-21 

THE GRAND CIRCUIT. 

COLUMBUS July 29 to Aug. 3 

BUFFALO Aug. 5-10 

GLENS FALLS Aug. 12-17 

READVILLE Aug. 19-24 

HARTFORD Sept. 2-6 

SYRACUSE Sept. 9-13 

PROVIDENCE Sept. 26-30 

TERRE HAUTE Sept. 30 to Oct. 5 

CALIFORNIA. 

P. C. T H. B. A., SACRAMENTO July 30 to Aug. 3 

SANTA ROSA August 12 to 17 

WOODLAND, District No. 40 August 26-31 

CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR, Sacramento Sept. 2-14 

FERNDALE, Humboldt Sept. 10-14 

GOLDEN GATE RACE MEETING, Oakland. . .Sept. 16 to 24 incl 

STOCKTON Sept. 16 to 21 

CONCORD. (District No. 23) Sept. 23 to 28 

LOS ANGELES Sept. 28 to Oct. 12 incl 

THE FIRST MEETING of the harness racing cir- 
cuit in California for 1901 will open at Sacramento 
next Tuesday under the auspices of the Pacific Coast 
Trotting Horse Breeders Association. Laying aside 
all the feeling that induces one in our position to praise 
and boom a meeting before it commences, we say with 
the utmost confidence in the truth of our predictions 
that there will be some of the greatest racing at Sac- 
ramento next week that the admirers of harness horses 
have seen for years in this Stato, and that in some of 
the races time will be made that would be considered 
fast on the Grand Circuit now in progress over East. 
The fields of horses that will start in the main events 
each day will be large and will rank in looks and breed- 
ing with the product of any country on earth. That 
a few very high class trotters and pacers will be devel- 
oped from the green ranks is as certain as fate, and 
from those ihat will start at Sacramento will come 
several with speed enough to cross the mountains next 
year and do battle with the speed giants that start for 
the big purses and stakes over there. The arrange- 
ments for the meeting are more complete than at any 
previous meeting of this association within our knowl- 
edge. Everything is in readiness. The track, covered 
last summer with a new coating of yellow clay is in the 
very best possible shape for fast miles, and those who 
have visited the famous State Fair track know that it 
is an ideal place for a race meeting. The very best 
accommodations can be had at the hotels and restau- 
rants of the capital city and the weather is more 
pleasant at this time than during the middle and latter 
part of August. The outlook is for a splendid meeting 
with high class racing and fast time and those who 
fail to attend will miss a week of rare enjoyment and 
good sport. One of the features of the meeting is the 
generous provision that has been made for horses 
owned by members of regularly organized driving 
clubs, and some very warm contests will result from 
these races that have been placod on the program. 
The Sacramento Driving Club and the Golden Gate 
Park Driving Association will both be represented in 
these races. The matinee given on the Fourth of July 
by the latter club at the Oakland track furnished as 
good a day of sport as can be enjoyed in any Eastern 
city and it has been a matter of general remark that 
the racing lately furnished by the members of this 
organization are a great improvement over those of 
former meetings. The driving clubs are organizations 
that have done, and are doing, much for the develop- 
ment of the American trotter, and they should be 
encouraged by the regular racing organizations. The 



P. C. T. H. B. A. recognizes this fact and has placed 
several events for these clubs on its program, and we 
are glad to know that every one has filled with a good 
list of entries, so classified that good contests are 
almost certain in every race. The six $1000 stakes, 
with the other regular events, will furnish racing that 
will be second to that seen at no place in America unless 
it be the Grand Circuit. The Breeders meeting will 
be a success this year and you should be there to take 
part in it. 

LETTERS WERE RECEIVED during the past 
week by Secretary Kelley of ihe Breeders associ- 
ation and Secretary Teed of the Los Angeles associa- 
tion that for audacity of the pure unadulterated variety 
undoubtedly load anything we have seen for years. 
The loiter addressed to the secretary of the Breeders 
meeting was a sort of round robin and contained the 
names of several well known trainers and horsemen, 
some of whom have since written that they never 
signed such a document, did not know of its existence 
and utterly repudiated its contents. This letter pur- 
ported to express the sentiments of a number of owners 
and trainers who had met and declared they would not 
take their horses to Sacramento to race unless the 
meeting was postponed one week. The letter to the 
Los Angeles secretary, although signed by but one 
name, stated that "a mutual agreement between every 
horseman here and a good many others elsewhere"' 
had resulted in a determination among them to pay 
forfeit in purses already closed and not start at Los 
Angeles unless tho date of closing the additional purses 
advertised was changed from August 3d to July 20th. 
This letter further stated that "Woodland had already 
accepted this reasonable suggestion, and the Breeders 
are considering it now, " statements which were entirely 
without foundation, and it wasaddod: "If thev don't, 
not one horse here (some 58) will leave for Sacramento." 
We will not mention the name of the party who signed 
this audacious letter, nor the track from which it was 
written, but wo will state that none of the horses that 
he controls stayed away from Sacramento, but are 
there now and we doubt not will start in every race 
where their owner thinks he has a chance of getting 
his entrance money. As for there being 58 horses at 
the track in question that will be entered this year 
there were not one-third of that number. It has 
already been considered eminently proper for horse 
owners and trainers to write to Secretaries of racing 
associations and offer suggestions as to classes, purses 
and dates of closing entries, and all such suggestions 
have been courted and gladly received, but such letters 
as the two above referred to are not only impudent, 
but misleading and unfair in every way. The one 
written to the Breeeders associat'on was answered 
and its demands refused, and tho one sent to Los 
Angeles got a prompt and emphatic reply to the effect 
that the dates of closing would re nain as advertised 
and that tho Los Angeles association does not propose 
to bo dictated to by any body of horse owners or 
trainers who desire to get their horses into classes 
where they do not, belong. It would Iserve tho instiga- 
tors of such letters no more than right if their entries 
were refused in the future by every association that 
receives such impudent epistlos as those here referred to. 



U/OODLAND'S MEETING should be attended by 
" ' every harness horse owner and trainer in Cali- 
fornia. Entries to the harness races close next Mon- 
day, July 2!)th. and the entry list should be a big one. 
The Woodland Association always gives a good fair, 
always pays its purses in full, provides well for the 
horsemen in every way and holds meetings and gives 
racing when other districts are idle. This year the 
harness horses in training in California would have but 
very little earning capacity were it not for the State 
Fair, the Breeders Association and the Woodland, 
Santa Rosa and Los Angeles Associations, and it is no 
more than right that owners and trainers should show 
their appreciation and gratitude by giving these asso- 
ciations liberal entry lists. Especially is this the case 
at Woodland and we hope to see the purses which 
close on Monday next get a very large entry. The 
Woodland track is ono of the best on the Coast, the 
stall and other accommodations most ample, and there 
is no district fair in Northern California where the 
betting is as good as at Woodland, and those who back 
their horses there can win large sums if their horses 
are first to the wire. Tho time for closing these purses 
Monday next, permits all horses entered to go out and 
race to a fast record at the Breeders meeting and at 
Santa Rosa without barring them from starting at 
Woodland. Get your entry blank filled out next Mon- 
day and mail it to Secretary Thomas at Woodland. 



THIS IS THE DAY for the closing of entries to the 
trotting and pacing purses offered by the State 
Agricultural Society for its fair this year at Sacra- 
mento. The 2:40 and 2:20 class trots are for $800 each, 
the 2:14 class trot is for $1000. There are two pacing 
events, the 2:25 and the 2:17 class, for which $800 are 
hung up, and $1000 will be given the 2:13 class pacers. 
There are also throe stakes, one for pacing three year 
olds, one for pacing four year olds and one for trotting 
four year olds. In each of these stakes tho entrance 
is $10, the starting fee is $20, all of which goes into the 
stake, and tho Society adds $250. The money is 
divided 00, 30 and 10 per cent. There is a novel condi- 
tion in the 2:40 trot. Horses entered in this race that 
trot to a record of of 2:25 prior to August 10th will not 
be eligible to start, but the entry may be transferred 
to the 2:20 class, and in the event of his being already 
entered in this class, the entrance money in the 2:40 
class will be refunded. The same condition accom- 
panies the 2:25 class pace and applies to horses getting 
a record of 2:20 or better and transfers them to tho 
2:17 class. The State Fair will furnish an excellent 
program of harness races this year. In addition to 
these preliminary stakes there will be enough addi- 
tional purses offered to make 24 races for the meeting, 
or two races per day. Don't forget that the entries to 
these preliminary races close to-day, Saturday, July 
27th, and see that you mail them in time. 



TWELVE RUNNING STAKES with a good sum 
of added money for each are announced by the 
Los Angeles Association, District No. 0, in this issue. 
The Los Angeles meeting will open this year on Sep- 
tember 28th and there will be thirteen days of racing. 
In addition to the stakes advertised there will bo three 
or more running events each day, entries to which 
will close over night. The Los Angeles meeting will 
be the best ever held in Southern California. 



SANTA ROSA ENTRIES close next Saturday. 
This will be a well attended meeting, and as the 
track is a great favorite with the horsemen, a big 
entry list will be made. Mind up your mind to enter 
there. A special train will take horses there from 
Sacramento at a low rate. 



BIDS for Betting Privileges at the State Fair are 
advertised for by the California State Agricultural 
Society. They will be received up to 11 A. M. August 
10th, by the Secretary, Geo. W. Jackson, at Sacra- 
mento. See advertisement. 



MR. J. C. QUINN, the leading harness horse trainer 
of the Hawaiian Islands, who has the "gray 
ghost of Santa Paula," Waldo J. in his string, cam'o 
up from the Islands on the last steamer for a fow 
weeks' visit in this State. Mr. Quinn is renewing old 
acquaintances while here and will take in the Breeders 
meeting at Sacramento next week. 



American Horses in England. 

The sum of $100,000 won by our equine representa- 
tives in England, up to tho 1st day of July, is not to be 
sneezed at. Of course, W. Whitnoy leads the list of 
winning American owners, but chiefly through an 
English-bred horse. Volodyovski, Mr. Keene being sec- 
ond through the Oaks victory of Cap and Bells. 
Domino ranks first among the American sires with the 
handsome veteran Sir Dixon next in say. After him 
come tho big Englishman, Watercress, and the dead 
hero Hanover. The following table shows the amounts 
won by each stallion's get,- together with the number 
of races won: 

Itaccs 

Stullious' Nfunea Won. Value. 

Domino 2 £6.175 

Sir Dixon 6 3,190 

Watercress * 6 2,634 

Hanover 4 2,464 

Galore * 2 1,017 

Sailor Prinoe* 3 644 

Henry of Navarre 1 "82 

St. Andrew* • 1 387 

Basset law * 2 370 

Potomas 8 385 

Pontiac* 3 260 

Havrten Edwards 1 261 

SirModredt 2 218 

Hindoo 1 195 

Riley 1 1»8 

Tammany I 18$ 

Cavalier* 1 Kg 

Deceiver 1 1 1,1 

Goldfinch* 1 100 

Luke Blackburn , 1 100 

Sensation 1 19° 

Savior Magus 1 121 

45 £20,369 

The probabilities are that the July winnings of the 
several American stables will bring this lotal up to 
about $125,000 in American money, as both Mr. Corri- 
gan and Mr. Croker have won several races since the 
fore part of the month. Mr. Keene "s horses have not 
run much lately, but will probably bo in evidence at 
the Goodwood meeting, which opens next week. It is 
held in the Duke of Richmond's park, on6 of the most 
beautiful spots in all England. It was at Goodwood 
that Ten Broeck first achieved his great victories with 
Umpire, who won tho Ham and tho Molecomb Stake 8 
Stakes in one week; and carried off the Goodwood 
Stakes with Starke (by Wagnor-Reel), who won the 
Goodwood Cup in the year following. Umpire was by 
Leconte-Alico Carneal and, after his failure to gain a 
placo in the Derby won by Thormanby, was sold to the 
Emperor of Russia for stud purposes, after having won 
eighteen races in England. Starke was sold to Austria, 
where he got Weissenrahd, the first winner of the 
Vienna Derby. Hidalgo. 

Henry Burgess, a steeplechase jockey, was killed last 
Saturday near New York while schooling a horse over 
the jumps. The animal bolted in front of one of the 
obstacles and threw tho rider, whose neck was broken 
by the fall. 



July 27, 1901] 



6 



The Cleveland Meeting. 

Our California horses have not been doing as well 
during the second week of the Grand Circuit as they 
did at Detroit. On Monday, the opening day, the 2:10 
trot had the three Californians Venus II., Phoebe 
Childers and Stamboulette as starters but they all 
finished outside the money. The race was won by 
Sister Alice in straight heats, 2:12 and 2:13 being the 
time. In the 2:13 pace there were ten starters Queen 
R. and You Bet representing this State. They were 
last in the summary. Andy McDowell won the race 
with Martha Marshall in straight heats, best time 
2:09i. Metallas, the Mambrino King stallion that sold 
for $16,000 at Detroit won the 2:16 trot, best time 2:11. 
None of the California horses started in this race. In 
the 2:20 pace, the three year old pacer Thornway, 
bred at Oakwood Park and owned by Col. J. C. Kirk- 
patrick, was started in a big field of aged horses. He 
won fourth money which was a pretty good showing 
as there were fifteen starters and the heats were paced 
n 2:10 and 2:09:}, Andabon Boy winning. 

On the second day Dr. Book trot-ted into the 2:16 list 
in the 2:14 trot, winning the first and second heats in 
2:10 and 2:114. Janice, William Harold's daughter, 
then took the third heat in 2:I0f. The dsspatches say 
that as Dr. Book had won his heats easily, young 
Durfee was reprimanded by the judges, fined $100 and 
Kenney substituted as the driver of the McKinney 
horse. The next three heats went to Palm Leaf, how- 
ever in 2:11 1, 2:13} and 2:18J-, so it does not look at this 
distance as if the judges bettered the condition of 
things any. Our Luckj' was also a starter in this race 
but finished last. The 2:07 pace went to Riley B. 
Charley Hoyt won the first in 2:06J, Riley B. the 
second in 2:08J, Eyelet the third in 2:11.1 and Riley 
B. the fourth in 2:09-5. N-o California horses were en- 
tered in this race. Dan Patch repeated his iDetroit 
victory by winning the 2:15 class pace in straight order, 
the fastest heat 2:10.1. California was not represented 
.n the race, nor in the 2:27 trot which was won by The 
King in straight heats in 2:13k 

Wednesday was a scorching hot day at Cleveland. 
Eleata, winner of the M. & M., won the 2:23 class trot 
with ease, her heats being in 2:11 J, 2*09j and 2:10. 
Country J was second and Neva Simmons third, the 
same positions they held at Detroit. The 2:17 pace 
was won by Richard A in 2:10} and 2:10}, none of the 
Coast horses starting. In the 2:09 pace George was 
returned winner. It was quite a fast race. Argetta 
won the first in 2:09}, George taking the noxt three in 
2:08J, 2:10£ and 2:09J. Sphynx S. got third money and 
Go9hen Jim fourth. Rey Direct also started but was 
last in the field of ten horses. Tom P. won the 2:21 
trot, best time 2:10*. Vic Schellar took third money. 

On Thursday, the fourth day, 15,000 were in attend- 
ance, the 2:07 trot with Charley Herr, The Monk and 
Kingmond as starters, being the drawing-card. The 
Monk took the first heat in the slow time of 2:13. 
Charley Herr won the next too handily in 2:09 and 
2:10k 

Star Pugh, winner of the Chamber of Commerce 
Stake, won the 2:23 class pace after six heats. He took 
the first in 2:11, Helen D. the second in 2:09:}, Plenty 
the third and fourth in 2: 104 and 2:10} and Star Pugh 
the fifth and sixth in 2:12£ and 2:14k Harry Logan 
got fourth money. Stanton Wilkes was eighth in the 
summary, Thornway ten and Rajah twelve. Dolly 
Dillon took third money in the 2:12 trot but did not 
win a heat. Cornelia took first two in 2:11 vnd 2:12, 
Onward Silver the next three in 2:101, 2:12} and 2:12. 
There were eight starters. None of the California 
contingent were starters in the 2:27 pace. Billy H. 
w on in straight heats 2:11 J and 2:10£. There were a 
dozen starters in this race. 'ihus far Eleata is the 
only California bred horse to win at Cleveland. 



Driving Club for Sacramento. 

A meeting was held -in Sacramento last Tuesday 
evening to take preliminary steps toward organizing a 
driving club. Those present at the meeting and those 
who have already signed the membership rolls are F. 
E. Wright, L. S. Upson, C. W. Paine, F. J. Ruhstaller 
Jr., William Trust, H. A. Bell, T. J. Hanrahan, G. W. 
Jackron, George EL Clark, Albert Elk us, Fred W. 
Keisel, H. O. Buckman, W. O. Bowers, W, E. Lam- 
pert, A. P. Booth, E. W. Hale, John Mackey. 

The greatest enthusiasm was shown by thoso present 
and it was the belief of all that the club would start off 
with a hundred charter Jmembers. Frank E. Wright 
was temporary chairman and L. S. Upson temporary 
Secretary. 

C. W. Paine, L. S. Upscu and Frank Ruhstaller, Jr 
were appointed a committee to draft a constitution 
and bylaws, for submission at the next meeting. 

A Committee on Membership consisting of ( '. W. 
Paine, L. S. Upson and George W. Jackson was ap- 
pointed to work up interest and get as many charter 
members as possible. 

It was agreed to meet on Monday evening next at 
the Capital Hotel to perfect the organization and elect 
officers for the ensuing year. 



Program for Breeders Meeting. 

TUESDAY, ,H I.Y SOTH. 
3:40 Class Trotting Stakes— SIOOO. 

Z. E. Drake's b g Billie L. 

Albert Joseph's ch m Floradora by Sable Steinway, clam Pearl 
by Blue Bull. 

A. G. Gurnett's What Is It by Direct, dam Lassie Jean by Briga- 
dier. 

Robert Freeman's b g PriDce L. by Escort, dam Queen L. 
I. H. Mulholland's br g Peter Jackson by Designer, dam by 
Abbotsford. 

P. H. Quinn's blk h Black Bart by Robin, dam by Williamson's 
Belmont. 

Ho Yow's b m Chiuamaid by McKinney, dam Blauchward by 
Onward. 

D. P. Oglesby's br s.'Almonada by Eros, dam Maggie by Nutwood. 
Vendome Stock Farm's b m Nora McKinney by McKinney, dam 

Lady by Dexter Prince. 

W. S. Maben's b g Doctor Mac by McKinney, dam by Bob Mason. 

T. C. Cabney's, b m Sigart by Mustapha, dam Rapidan by Over, 
land: br m Pearl K. by Wayland W., dam by Grand Moor. 

•£: 35 Class Pacing Stakes— *1 OOO. 

W. H. Williams' b m Julia Shake by Delgoma, dam by Shakes 
peare. 

H. W. Meek's b g Enoch by Sidmore, dam Belle by James Lick. 

E. W. Runyon's b m Banker's Daughter by Arthur Wilkes, dam 
Sunflower. 

C. Whitehead'! s g Toppy by Delphi, dam by Dexter Prince. 

A. H. Cohen's br h Advertisor by Advertiser, dam Alfredetta by 
Steinway. 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm's ch g B. S. Dillon by Sidney Dillon, dain 
Biscara. 

S. K. Trefry's br s Direct C. by Direct, dam Rosie C. 
Wm. G. Layng's b g Sir Albert S. by Diablo, dam Eme Logan by 
Durfee. 

Wm. Hogoboom's b g Harry J. by Reavis' Steinway, dam by 
Singleton. 

D. F. Oglesby's ch m Nellie I. by Gossiper. 

W. S. Maben's b m Redline by Jud, dam by Redcloake; b m 
Electra by Silkwood, dam by Woolsey. 
T. J. Crowley's ch g Sandow by Dictatus, dam Etta by Naubue 
S. H. Hoy's br m Reta H. by McKinney, dam by Irvington. 

H. H. Helman's br s Motanic by Chehalis, dam by Hamboy. 
Vendome Stock Farm's ch m Our Boy's Sister by Baywood, dam 

by Wapsie. 

T. C. Cabney's b g Al Sandy by Wayland W , dam Rapidan by 
Overland. 

Palace Hotel Stakes for Members <;. <;. P. I>. C. 

Mr. A. L. Jacobs names br s Eden Vale by Eros. 
Mr. Van Kuren names br m Mattie B. by Alex Button. 
Mr. F. Gommet names b g Lafayette by Liberty Sontag. 
Mr. A. Joseph names br g Durfee Mc by McKinney. 
Mr. Peudergast names b g Bollivar. 

WEDNESDAY. JULY 31ST. 
3:13 Class, Pacing— Stakes SBIOOO. 
C. Whitehead's blk s Delphi by Director dam Etta by Dexter 
Prince. 

M. Hart's br m Hermia bj Soudan. 
S. F. Martin's blk h Doc Wilkes by Mambrino Wilkes. 
C. W. Farrer's ch g El Diablo by Diablo dam Elwood by A. W 
Richmond. 

H. H. Dunlap's b g King Cadenza by Steinway dam Empress by 
Flaxtail. 

J. B. Iverson's ch m Dictatress by Dictatus dam Salinas Belle by 
Carr's Vermont. 

S. C. Tryon's blk m Margaretta by Direct dam RositaA. by Adrian. 
J. D. Hein's I) s John A. by Wayland W. dam Lady Moor by Grand 
Moor. 

The Speedway Stakes. 

Mr. I. B. Dalzlel names brm Belle Hansen by Almonition. 
Mr. Geo. L. Swett names b g Steve S. 
Mr. J. W. Bonney names b g Joe Bonney. 
Mr. D. A. McLaughlin names gr m Alameda Maid. 
Mr. C. E. Parks names s g Imp by Diablo. 
Mr. J. G. Cuicello names bg Denny Healy by Gossiper. 
Trot or pace to be announced Monday. 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1ST. 
Sacramento Driving Club Stakes. 

Mr. L. A. Upson names b m Re'gina F. 

Mr. C. W. Paine names b h Peo. 

Mr. Ruhstaller. Jr., names b h Monroe Jr. 

Mr. H. A. Bell names br m Pansy. 

Mr. Wm. Trust names br h Candy Joe. 

Mr. F. E. Wright names br h Baby Button. 

San Francisco Stakes 
Mr. J. Doran names b g Tirado by Azmoor. 
Mr. H. W. Meek names b m Cricri by Direct. 
Mr. Geo. Gray names blk m Cyrene by Guide. 
Mr. J. G. Cuicello names b g Puerto Rico by Sable Wilkes. 
Mr. Neil Preudergast names b g Bolliver. 

Trot or |>ace lo be announced Tuesday. 
FRIDAY, AUCCST 3D. 
3:14 Class Trotting— Purse W10O0. 
W. S. Maben's gr s |Richmond Chief by iMonroe Chief, dam by 
A. W. Richmond. 

I. H. Mulholland's br s Osito by McKinney, dam Twilight by 
Othello. 

Walnut Grove Stock Farm's br m Lottie by San Diego, dam by 
Whippleton. 

J. W. Donathan's b g McBriar by McKinney, dam Briar Belle. 
Geo. A. Kelly's b m Anzella by Antrim, dam Hazel Kirk by Al- 
ward. 

S. H. Hoy's br g McNally by McKinney, dam by Alcazar. 
T. J. Crowley's b s Boydello by Boydell, dam by Durango Chief 
H. H. Helman's b g Ned Thorno by -Billy Thornhlll, dam Eady 
Nutwood by Nutwood. 

Vendome Stock Farm's b m Nora McKinney by McKinney, dam 
Lady by Dexter Prince. 

Golden <;alc Stakes— »300. 
Mr. A. J. Joseph names b g Durfee Mac by McKinney. 
Mr. A. Jabobs names b s Eden Vale by Eros. 
Mr. Jas. O'Kane names s g Sandow by Dictatus. 
Mr. D. R. Misner names b g Sable Le Grande by Sable Wilkes. 
Mr. D. Roberts names k g Algregor by Steinway. 

Trot or pace lo be announced Wednesday, 
s \ I I BDAT, \l <•■ ST :iD. 
3:30 Class Trolling Stakes— #1 OOO. 
H. L. Frank's b s Ben Liebes by McKinney, dam Belle McGregor 
by Robert McGregor. 



James Collin's br g Puerto Rico by Sable Wilkes, dam Mamie 
Kohl by Steinway. 

Wm. Murray's b m Mary P. by Alexander Button. 

J. H. Kelly's b g Roxo by Conifer, dam by A. W. Richmond. 

Albert Joseph's eh m Floradora by Sablo Steinway, dam Pearl 
by Blue Bull. 

A. G. Gurnett's 1) g Zombra by McKinney, dam Nellie Fairmont 
by Fairmont. 

Robert Freeman's b g Prince L. by Escort, dam Queen L. 
Ho Yow's b m Solo by McKinney, dam by Stamboul. 

D. F. Oglesby's Almonada by Eros, dam Maggie E. by Nutwood 
Vendome Stock Farm's ch h/rhomas R. by Iran Alto, dam Yadrel 

by Nutwood. 

3:17 Class Pacing SI a kes— If 1000. 

Chas. W. Farrar's ch g El Diablo by Diablo, dam Elwood by A 
W. Richmond. 

S. F. Martin's 1) m Miramoute by Diablo, dam Mountain Maid by 
Creseo. 

M. Hart's b m Hermia by Soudan, dam Hattie by Tom Patchen. 
J. L. Smith's ch s Gaff Topsail by Diablo, dam Belle by Alcona. 
H. W. Meek's b g Enoch by Sidmore, dam Belle by James Lick. 

E. W. Runyon's b m Banker's Daughter by Arthur Wilkes, dam 
Suntiower. 

C. Whitehead's s g Toppy by Delphi, dam by Dexter Prince. 

A. H. Cohen's br h Advertisor by Advertiser, dam Alfredetta by 
Steinway. 

S. K. Trefry's blk s Freddie C. by Direct, dam Rosie C. 
Wm. G. Layng's b g Sir Albert S. by Diablo, dam Effle Logan by 
Durfee. 

D. F. Oglesby's ch m Nellie I. 

H. H. Helman's br s Motanic by Chehalis, dam by Hamboy. 
Vendome Stock Farm's ch m Our Boy's Sister by Baywood. dam 
by Wapsie. 

Aigeltingcr Stukes for Members <;. <i. P. I). ( 

Mr. B. Croner names ch g Butcher Boy by Secretary. 

Mr. Geo. L. Swett names br g Steve S. 

Mr. J. G. Cuicello names I) g Denny Healey by Gossiper. 

Dr. I. B. Dalziel names br m Belle Hansen. 

Mr. L. Richardson names b m Menlo Belle by Menlo. 

HOOF BEATS. 

Montallade broke the record of the Butte, Montana, 
track last Wednesday by running seven furlongs in 
1:27*. 

Some lar^e pools are sold at the Butte meeting. 
One day last week several were sold that called for 
from $600 to $!I00 each. 



"Cash" Sloan recently rode nineteen consecutivo 
winners at the Warsaw, Poland, meeting. Jean De 
Reszke, for whom "Cash" is riding, also made a record. 
In the course of thirteen days he started fourteen 
horses in forty races, winning thirty and being placed 
in all but two of the others. 



They are breaking records up in Montana. On 
Wednesday of last week Odd Eyes broke the world's 
record for a mile and an eighth over the hurdles, run- 
ning the distance in ]2:02. The record was formerly 
held by Winslow, who made the distance at Chicago 
in August, 1888, in 2:02k 

A. H. & D. H. Morris' Compute, at the lucrative 
price of 30 to 1, won the rich Fox hall stakes of $15,000 
at Brighton Beach last Saturday. In one of the most 
sensational races of the meeting he won by a scant 
half length, while Hyphen beat William C. Whitney's 
Goldsmith a head for the place. 

George Bernard, the well known Denver horseman 
refused an offer of .$4000 for Rex Blees, his gaited 
saddle horse. The offer was made by E. R. Sims of 
Kansas City, who owns Limestone Bell, the greatest 
high school mare of the country. Mr. Bernaid states 
that he would not take less than $5000. 

If Sir Thomas Lipton fails to "lift" the America's 
cup this year with Shamrock II. he intends to drop 
international yachting and devote his leisure to the 
turf. R. S. Siever, a professional backer of horses, 
now owns what are regarded as the best four two year 
olds in training in England — Scepter, Duke of West- 
minster, Lavengro and Doochary — for which Lipton, 
anxious to begin racing with a big boom, has offered 
$300,000, a record price. Thoy are entered in all the 
classic races, and Siever has asked Lipton $100,000 more. 

Cash Sloan had an introduction to a Russian mob 
recently at Moscow and narrowly escaped with his life. 
He has been riding in front so often on tho Russian 
tracks that tho people who attend ohe races there 
began to beliovo he could win on any eld horse and 
when he lost a race the othor day a raging mob of 
males and females attacked him. Had it not been for 
tho protection afforded by a strong detachment of 
police Cash would have been torn limb from limb in 
tho true Russian fashion. This goos to show that tho 
people who play tho races in Russia aro very much 
like thoso who play them in America. They are ready 
to attack any jockey who finishes in tho wrong place 
according to their dope. , 

Several Californians who have returned from Mon- 
tana aro industriously circulating tho report that the 
meeting there is not up to the mark which was ex- 
pected. While it is doubtless true that the demise of 
Marcus Daly has made it impossible to hold race meet- 
ings at Butte and Anaconda or. tho same generous plan 
that was pursued when he was tho power behind it, 
the records show that the meeting being given by tho 
present management is fully up to the standard of rac- 
ing in other communities of thesamo population. Cali- 
fornia race goers, especially those who are constant 
attendants at tho winter meetings here, should not 
compare a small mooting in Montana with those givon 
in San Francisco. Tho conditions are not similar. 
Wo doubt if a high class meeting could bo givon hore 
during tho summer while all tho big Eastern tracks 
are running, and if such be the case, how can the 
comparatively small town of Butte be expected to? 
Tho racing at Butte has been clean, there is a fair 
amount of betting, and the officials have been attentive 
to the wants of horsemen and the comfort of the 
public. Nothing more could be asked in reason. 



[July 27, 1901 




Attend the Breeders meeting. 



State Fair entries close to-day. 

Woodland's harness purses close next Monday. 

Directum Fay 2:29$, is a new performer|for Directum 
2:05J. 

Dr. Book 2:10, is the fourth 2:10 performer for Mc- 
Kinney. 

Valentine by Boodle won a heat in 2:20 at Cleveland 
recently. 

Winfield Stratton was separately timed in 2:08 at 
Windsor. 

August 3d is the date of closing of Santa Rosa and 
Los Angeles entries. 

Sacramento will have a driving club with a hundied 
charter members. 

The 2:13 pace is on the program for Wednesday at 
the Breeders meeting next week. 

Santa Rosa harness races close Saturday next, 
August 3d. See the advertisement. 

There will be more than one 2:10 pacer brought out 
in California this year in our opinion. 

Neva Simmons is the sixteenth 2:15 trotter for Sim- 
mons, but none of them have ever reached the 2: 10 list. 

Derby Simmons, a brother to Owyhee 2:11, by Chas. 
Derby, is being trained bv Frank Shank at Litchfield, 
Ohio. 

An exchange says that by ali odds the pacer Plenty 
2:12}, by Superior is the homeliest horse out this 
season. 

Metallas, the $16,000 horse;, rounded to on reaching 
Cleveland and won his race, reducing his record to 2:11 
in the third heat. 



Vance Nuckols is again in good standing with the 
National Trotting Association, and is out winning his 
share of the money. 

W. J. Connor of Springfield, O., has bought Lady 
Waldstein 2:15, by Waldstein, and will use her for road 
and matinee driving. 

How fast will they go at Sacramento this year in the 
green classes? is the question of the hour. We will be 
able to tell you next week. 

Woodland's trotting and pacing purses close next 
Monday. Don't miss the Woodland meeting. It will 
be one of the best ever held there. 

Aster 2:12, was 2-3-4 and out in a matinee race at 
Cleveland two weeks ago where the heats were in from 
2:17 to 2:20. He must have lost his speed. 



Stanton Wilkes 2:10}, by Nutwood Wilkes, won the 
consolation purse of the Chamber of Commerce stake 
at Detroit and showed himself a game race horse. 

The valuable mare Arline B. 2:26}, that was a close 
second at Denver in 2:15}, was killed by lightning at 
Colorado Springs, July 16th. She was valued at $4000. 



The 2:25 pace at the Breeders meeting will be one of 
the best contests ever seen in California from present 
appearances. It will be held on Tuesday the opening 
day. 

The Woodland track is in first-class shape, and will 
be kept so. The horsemen are always given a fast 
track at Woodland and this year it will be better than 
ever. 

The Horseman says that Miss Mary E. Munson, sec- 
retary of the Pekin, 111., trotting association is the 
only woman secretary of a trotting association in the 
west. 



Several of the California trainers who wont East with 
visions of first money in nearly every start are said to 
be sitting up nights studying Murray Howe's Excuse 
Book. 



Francis Smart of Denver has reconsidered his inten- 
tion of retiring his fast mare. Lottie Smart, and will 
start her at Terre Haute and Columbus. He will also 
ship Dudie Egmont with the mare. 



Tho largest pool sold on the M. & M. at Detroit 
called for $15,000. E E. Smathers of New York paid 
$10,000 for tho field in this race, and N. W. Hubinger 
paid $5000 for the ticket on Eleata. 



The famous pacer, Coney 2:02, now wears a set- of 
web hopples with black leather loops that were made 
by J. O'Kane, of New York and San Francisco. Webb 
hopples never stretch, are lighter than laather and 
very strong. 

Mrs. I. M. Lipson, of Los Angeles, sends us a snap 
shot of her fourteen months old colt Zanut by Zombro 
out of Miss Goldnut. He is entered in tho Occident 
Stake and the Stanford as well. The picture shows 
him to be a very handsome colt, a worthy descendant 
of an illustrious sire, and we shall give it a place among 
our illustrations in the near future. 



When your horse begins to show signs of lameness 
don't delay the matter, but put on a liberal quantity 
of Vita Oil, rub it in well, wrap with a damp bandage 
and it is a pretty good proposition that the lameness 
will not show the next day. Now give needed rest and 
the chances are that you will be able to start him 
when the bell rings at Sacramento. 



Tho Concord fair will be one of the best of the small 
country fairs. It will be held September 25th, 26th, 
27th and 28th. Entries will close September 20th. 
Read tho advertisement in this issue. 



Col. J. C. Kirk Patrick's three year old colt. Thorn- 
way by Steinway, started in the 2:20 pace at Cleveland 
on Monday and saved his entrance by finishing fourth 
in the race. The heats were in 2:10 and 2:09$. 

Saturday, the last day of the Breeders meeting, will 
have a great program. The 2:20 trot and the 2:17 pace 
are down for decision that day and a race for driving 
club horses will make out a program that will be worth 
going to see. 



Waldo .1. 2:08 is by Bob Mason, dam by A. W. Rich- 
mond. The omission of three words in the caption 
under the picture on our front page last week made it 
read as if the last named stallion was the sire of tho 
Honolulu champion instead of the sire of his dam. 

The three year old Thornway by Steinway must 
have pacod a good race at Cleveland when he got 
fourth money in the 2:20 pace. It was won by Audo- 
bon Boy in 2:10 and 2:09$ and a field of sixteen horses 
started, all of them aged except Mr. Kirkpatrick's colt. 



The sale of the German Government horses held at 
William G. Layng's Occidental Horse Exchange was 
quite successful. Seventy-five head were disposed of 
in three hours, which, considering the fact that tho 
teamsters' strike is on this week, was very good selling. 

The well known writer and specialist, Gilbert Tomp- 
kins, has left the Chicago Horseman, in which he has 
conducted the balancing department for the past three 
years. He is going into the work of stopping gait 
faults and regulating trotting and pacing action.— .V. 
F. Spirit of tlu: Times. 

King Cadenza, the Steinway pacer, and Mary P., 
he Alex. Button trotter, were worked a mile at the 
Woodland track last Saturday and stepped it together 
in 2:19.}. Alta Vela 2:15} showed a mile in 2:17 very 
handily, and John A. 2:12} was driven a mile in about 
the samo notch. All these horses were taken to Sacra- 
mento this week and will start at the Breeders' meeting. 



Here is a sample pool on the M. & M. sold just before 
the race was started: Eleata $400, Neva Simmons $200, 
Country Jay $45, Quoddy Girl $75, Iva Dee $105, George 
Smith $40, 'Porto Rico $20, A. J. D. $55, Algoneta $10, 
Alberta D $15, Belle Kuser $20, Louise Jefferson $50, 
Poindextor $65, Ted $100 and John Hooper $10. The 
total amount in this pool was $1210. 



Klatawah 2:051 is now being worked with the hop- 
ples by trainer Allen at Empire City track, New York, 
and is said to be showing his old time speed and going 
kindly. Don Derby, the full brother to Diablo, that 
Keating gave $2000 for, is also being worked by Allen 
and showing well. If these two horses show capacity 
to race this year the credit will have to go to young 
Alien. 



Metallas 2:12}, the son of Mambrino King that beat 
Charlie Mac at Windsor and was in turn beaten by the 
California horse at Detroit, was purchased by Nick 
Hubinger prior to the Detroit race for $16,000. In 
justice to Metallas it should be stated that ho was a 
very sick horse after winning the first heat of his Do- 
troit race and was withdrawn after the second heat, 
in which he iinishod seventh. 



Arrangements have been completed for the cham- 
pion trotting stallion Cresceus to go an exhibition 
mile to wagon, in an effort to beat the wagon record, 
2:05J, hold by Tho Abbot, at Elkwood Park on August 
7th, tho opening day of the meeting. The receipts of 
that day are to be donated to the Monmouth county 
hospitals. Other noted horses will trot or pace exhi- 
bition miles in addition to the regular program. 



Harry Logan was made favorite in the Chamber of 
Commerce according to the Chicaijo Horseman, which 
adds that his chances were undoubtedly interfered 
with by the great use that was made of his speed in 
the middle half of the first heat, which he paced in 
1:01. Star Pugh, the winner, was always so complete 
a master of the situation, however, that the result 
would have been the same under any circumstances. 



W. F. Steele says he knows he made a big mistake 
when he sold the trotting mare Lamp Girl 2:09. She 
was only in training twelve weeks, and the wonderful 
improvement she made in that short time is attested 
by the good race she put up at Lexington, Ky., in 
October. "She can beat all trotters in Europe over 
any distance of ground they race, and I don't know of 
a horse in her class capable of defeating her in this 
country." 

Mr. Ben Davies of San Bernardino, writes tho 
Breeder and Sportsman under date of July 22d, 
that Zolock 2:10i, his great son of McKinney 2:11}, has 
had a very successful reason, having been bred to 93 
mares up to this time, with eight moro booked. Many 
of those mares are high class in individuality and 
breeding. Mr. Milo M. Potter of the Van Nuys Hotel, 
Los Angeles, bred ten very fine mares, and has pur- 
chased eight Zolock colts. Ho has one that is very 
promising, having driven him a half the other day in 
1:13. Mr. E. D. Roberts drove his filly by Zolock a 
quarter in 38 seconds with a month's work, and Mr. 
Sumner Wright has a beautiful brown yearling filly 
by Zolock that went a quarter in 45 seconds. It looks 
very much as though Zolock would be a producer of 
extreme speed the first year any of his colts start as 
they are a very promising lot. Mr. Davies believes 
that from his breeding and the form ho has shown, 
Zolock is McKinney 's heir apparent and that he should 
bo the best entire son of that horse. Zolock will be 
bred to but a few choice mares next year and then 
raced with the idea of giving him a very lew record, 
which he is certainly capable of securing, and it should 
be 2:05 or better. 



On Friday at Sacramento the 2:14 trot will be de- 
cidod. It will be an unlucky day for the losers 

Tho opening day of the Breeders meeting will fur- 
nish one of tho best programs of harness events ever 
seen on a California track. The 2:40 trot and the 2:25 
pace will bring out all the best green trotters and pac- 
ers in training in this State. Those who miss tho 
opening day will miss tho best day's racing of the 
meeting. 



There is a mighty fast trotter over East this year 
that ought to pace in two minutes before the summer 
is over. His owner handicapped him with tho name 
of Goo Goo Eyes, yet he went out and won his first 
race and got a record of 2:18}. A horse that can go 
that fast and win with a name like that must be a 
good one. 

The Buffalo Driving Club has declared off the 2:07 
trot announced for the Grand Circuit meeting, August 
5th to 8th, owing to the fact that there were but two 
entries, Kingmond and The Monk, and a free for all 
pace, for which it is expected the crack pacers from 
the Detroit and Cleveland meetings and from the East 
will enter, has been opened in its stead. 



H. B. Brastow, Secretary of the Santa Barbara Rac- 
ing Association, reports that the two days' racing 
given over the Santa Barbara track on July 4th and 
5th was very successful and that the association will 
probably give a couple of days' racing again this sum- 
mer. This is not the district association, but a recently 
organized club that provides racing for local horses. 



Sue, the bay mare by Athadon, which C. E. Clark 
of Fresno is campaigning over the Great Western Cir- 
cuit in the Mississippi Valley, is making a sort of 
triumphal procession through that country. Since 
starting at Denver she has not lost a race and has won 
them all in straight heats. Her race at Des Moines, 
Iowa, July 16th, was easy for her, the miles being 
2:l!>i, 2:16 "and 2:14}. Her record is 2:12}, made at 
Davenport, but will bo 2:10 or better before she heads 
for California. 

Louise Jefferson was sold at Detroit to C. K. G. Bill- 
ings of Chicago for $7500. Louise Jefferson, who is by 
Jefferson out of Brown Bess, is a Colorado-bred mare. 
She was purchased by George Estabrook when she 
was a three-year-old from Charley Owens, whose stock 
farm has sent out some of tho greatest speed in the 
West. She was trained very carefully by JoeMcGuire 
and was the winner of two events this season at Denver, 
one of the events being a $1000 stake. 

Mr. Josef Mueller of Portland, Oregon, has recently 
purchased from Geo. T. Beckers a two year old stallion 
by Zombro 2:11, dam Mineola by McKinney 2:11}, 
second dam Kitty Baker by Echo, third dam by Gen. 
Taylor, the 30 mile champion. The colt is a handsome 
bay and a very promising young trotter. He carries 
more of the blood of McKinney than any stud colt liv- 
ing and as he is sired by McKinney 's greatest son 
should be a very valuable horse in the stud. 

John Blue, who has been at Denver with the string 
of horses belonging to Ed Gaylord over since the close 
of the meeting there, left there on Wednesday of this 
week for the East and hopes to start soon on the 
Grand Circuit. He had in his string the two year old 
filly Confianza 2:41 by James Madison, Lee Crawford, 
a three year old by Steinway, Frank Dale (3) by Chas. 
Derby, the much touted trotter Yarrum 2:19} by Dic- 
tator Prince, and the fast green pacer Geo. E. Bennett 
by Alex. Button. The last named horse after pacing 
trials in 2:10 at Pleasanton went lame while working a 
mile in 2:40 at Denver, but it is thought he will round 
to. Frank Dale, the colt that reared and fell at 
Denver, is coming around all right and will start again 
later on. Mr. Gaylord will join Blue about the middle 
of September. 

The stallion Wilkes Boy 2:24}, ono of the best sons 
of George Wilkes, died July 13th, at Elmhurst Farm, 
near Lexington, Ky. Wilkes Boy is the horse that 
made T. C. Anglin famous as a breeder of trotters, and 
enabled him to retire with a good fortune. He was 
sired by George Wilkes, dam Bettie Brown, dam of 
Anglin 2:27} and Parnell 2:29}, and the grandam of 
Anglia 2:11} and Patchen Boy 2:191 by Mambrino 
Patchen, second dam Pickles by Mambrino Chief. He 
was 21 years old; inflammation of the stomach caused 
his death. Wilkes Boy was the sire of 60 horses in the 
2:20 list, the fastest of which are Courier-Journal 2:06, 
Judge Swing 2:08}, York Boy 2:09}, Patchen Boy 2:103, 
Constantino 2:12}, Oratorio 2:13, Grattan 2:13 and St. 
Vincent 2:13}. Wilkes Boy was owned by Henry 
Schmulbach, of Wheeling. W. Va., and Robert C. 
Estill, of Lexington, they having purchased him for 
$35,000 at the closing out sale of Mr. Anglin in 1898. 
He has stood as a private stallion of late. 

But ono horse can win the M. & M. each year and 
many owners who fail to get inside the money think 
they' are in bad luck. There are few who get it any- 
worse, however, than the New York road driver Chas. 
Wieland did this year. Here is the story Percy tells 
about him: "No man about town is moro discouraged 
than Charles Weiland. He made two nominations for 
the M. & M. $10,000 race, and named Zarco and Lorna 
McGregor, intending to start the bettor after trying 
them thoroughly. Zarco was in W. H. McCarthy's 
stable at Charter Oak and worked miles below 2:20 
easily. Lorna McGregor was sent to Empire City 
track, and Trainer Flynn gave her a gradual prepara- 
tion 2:19$ the fastest mile. She seemed sensationally 
fast, and it looked as if sho would be the choice for the 
Detroit stake, when suddenly she developed a lame- 
ness. This left Zarco to start for the Weiland interests 
and McCarthy shipped him to Windsor to give him a 
p.-eparatory race. He won two heats and was favorite 
but lameness caused him to drop behind the distance 
flag. Next day the son of Artillery died. Mr. Wei- 
land is $500 out of pocket, besides a good trotter and 
several months' training bills, shipment and various 
incidentals." 



July 27, 1901] 



I THE SADDLE. 

################## 

A Good Lot of Runners. 

While there are a very large number of California 
thoroughbreds now racing at St. Louis, Chicago and 
New York, there are quite a number still in training 
in California and running at the Montana meeting. 
The following are expected to take part in the early 
California running meetings: 

The two year old division will be comprised of some 
of the best two year old performers on the Coast, 
namely: Glendenning, Achilles, Berkeleyite, B. C. 
Green, Botany, Carlo, Cayenne Pepper, Clear Sky, 
Coal Oil Johnny, Constable, Cruzados, Dan Collins, 
Dandy, Divina, Dawson, E. M. Brattain, Escalante 
Estado, Flattered, Florista, Fred Alterbury, Gerardo' 
Graham Green, Gus Abercombie, Hainault, Hon. Peter 
Stirling, Huachuca, Innocencia, Irma A., .Tarretiere 
d'Or, Knockings, Lady Carlo, Lou Welsea, Morelio, 
Montoya, Parizade, Pepper Sauce, Prestenne, Remele, 
Resin, San Lution, Shell Mount, Snowberry, St. Phil- 
lippina, Torso Maid, Tyranus, Water Scratch, Yellow 
Stone, You You, Vazalla. 

The following three year olds: Ada N., Beau Or- 
monde, Byron Rose, Catherine Bravo, Cora Goetz, 
Corn Cake, Cousin Carrie, Diderot, Eonic, Flatterer, 
Articulate, Galen Brown, Grafter, Jim Hale (winner of 
the Montana Derby), Lief Prince, Mamie Hildreth, 
Matilda O., Oscar Tolle, Parsifal, Phil Archibald, 
Princess Titania, Quito, Rey Dare, Rio Del Altar, 
Screenwell Lake, St. Rico, The Gaffer, Triple Cross, 
Wardman. 

Of the aged division the following ones are expected: 
Alaria, Alicia, Almoner, Amasa, Bavassa, Bogus Bill, 
Brown Prince, Burdoc, Canejo, Clarando, Coming 
Event, Cue, Dolore, Donator, Doublet, Dr. Nembula, 
Duckoy, El Mido, Espirando, Fannette, Flamero, 
Flush of Gold, Gauntlet, Good Hope, Grand Sachem 
Guilder, Gusto, Hagerdon, Harry Thatcher, HercuL 
lean, Heigh Hoe, Hilary, Horton, Katie Walcott, 
Kitty Kelly, Lavator, Lost Girl, McAlbert, Me- 
hanus, Merops, Midlove, Mike Rice, Mike Strauss, 
Mission, Mocorito, Montallade, Novia, Ned Dennis, 
Odd Eyes, 'Ostler Joe, Ping, Prestidigitator, Proclama- 
tion, Racetto, Ralston, Rio Chico, Rixford, Sea Lion> 
Sir Dougal, Sir Bampton, Snips, Spike, Stromo, The 
Buffoon, The Fretter, The Miller, Tiburon, Tom Cal- 
vert, Torsina, True Blue, Valencienne, Vantine, Wyom- 
ing, Yule. 

The above horses are either in California or racing in 
Montana; every effort will be made to secure all of 
them that are ready to race at the time of the Oakland 
race meeting, beginning September 16th. 



Results at Butte. 



Racing at Santa Monica. 

The twelfth annual races of the Southern California 
Polo Club will be held August 2d and 3d, at the race 
track of the Ocean Park Country Club, near Santa 
Monica. Tne officials who will be in charge of these 
races are the same as have conducted those meetings 
for eleven years, and are T. H. Dudley, J. E. Hoy, J. 
B. Proctor, W. H. Young and G. L. Waring. All of 
these gentlemen are well known in connection with 
amateur sport in California, and the program which 
has been provided promises to afford plenty of clean 
sport. The racing program includes the following: 

1. Three-quarters of a mile, polo pony race, for 
qualified polo ponies, 165 pounds top weight; weight 
for inches; gentlemen riders allowed seven pounds; $40 
to first, $20 to second. 

2. Trotters or pacers, 2:30 class, three-quarters of a 
mile, heats, two in three; $50 to first, $25 to second. 

3. Three-quarters of a mile, Galloway race, for 
horses fifteen hands and under, handicap, top weight 
160 pounds; gentlemen riders allowed seven pounds 
under handicap weights; $50 to first, $25 to second. 

4. Half a mile and repeat, for local saddle horses, 
140 pounds; $20 to first, $5 to second. 

5. Half a mile, for horses, ten pounds above scale; 
$50 to first, $25 to second. 

6. Five-eighths of a mile, for horses, ten pounds 
above scale, winner of race 5 to carry ten pounds extra; 
$50 to first, $25 to socond. 

7. Harness race, not yet decided upon. 

8. One mile, pony race, for ponies fourteen hands 
two inches and under, handicap, minimum weight 125 
pounds; gentlemen riders allowed five pounds below 
handicap weights; $50 to first, $25 to second. 

9. One mile, for local saddle horses, handicap, mini- 
mum weight 15 pounds; $20 to first, $5 to second. 

10. Seven-eighths of a mile, for horses, fifteen 
pounds above scale, winner of race 5 or 6 to carry ten 
pounds extra; gentlemen riders allowed seven pounds; 
■ts50 to first, $25 to second. 

11. One mile, for horses, thirty pounds above the 
scale; gentlemen riders allowed seven pounds; $50 to 
first, $25 to second. 

12. Three-quarters of a mile, consolation, for ponies 
that have not run first or second at the meeting; $20 
to first, $5 to second. 

Ponies are fourteen hands two inches and under. 
Galloways are fifteen hands and under. 
Weight for inches is five pounds allowed for every 
half inch'under the standard. 
The secretary is G. L. Waring, Santa Monica. 



July 18. One mile — Calvert won, Cousin Letty 
second, The Buffoon third. Time 1:14. 

Six furlongs — Miss Remsen won, Alaria second, 
Devereaux third. Time 1:15). 

Five furlongs— Sir Dougall won, Midlove second, 
Espirando third. Time 1:01 J. 

Five and a half furlongs — Hagerdon won, Valen- 
cienne second, Algaretta third. Time 1:07. 

Four and a half furlongs — Innocencia won, Walter 
Scratch second, E. M. Brattain third. Time 0:55. 

One mile and an eighth Gauntlet won, Ting-a-Ling 
second, Dominie third. Time 1:56§. 

July 19. Pacing, two in three — Royal won, Al Me 
second, J. D. third Best time 2:174\ 

Five furlongs — Clara May won, Nimrod second, 
Maggie K. third. Time 1:034. 

Three furlongs — Jack won, Big Dutch second, 
Walapaugh third. Time 0:36. 

Five and one-half furlongs — Duckoy won, Montallade 
second, Dot H. third. Time 1:08|. 

Five furlongs — Yellowstone won, Constable second, 
Tyranus third. Time 1:03. 

Five furlongs — Jean Spencer won, Bill Bohamsen 
second, Au riff era third. Tfrne 1:02.1. 

One mile and a quarter, hurdle handicap — Odd Eyes 
won, Sam Green second, Delgado third. Time 2:19]. 

July 20. Six furlongs — Virgie d'Or won, Adnooi 
second, Kenova third. Time 1:15. 

One mile and seventy yards — Ida V. won, Domsie 
second, Bert Davis third. Time 1:48^. 

Five furlongs, Owners' handicap— Doublet won, 
Hagerdon second, Decapo third. Time 1:00, breaking 
the track record made by May W. in 1896. 

Four and a half furlongs — Innocencia won, Dandy 
second, Walter Scratch third. Time 0:55. 

One mile — Sylvan Lass won, Jim Hale second, Bur- 
dock third. Time 1:42 J. 

One mile and twenty yards — Spindle won, St. Ger- 
main second, The Buffoon third. Time l:43j. 

One mile and a sixteenth — Sisquoc won, Brown 
Prince second, Silver Coin third. Time 1:49L 

July 22. Five furlongs — Reap won, Arline B. second, 
Clear Sky third. Time l:02f. 

Ono mile and twenty yards — Monda won, Free Pass 
second, Ping third. Time l:43f. 

Five furlongs — Aunt Mary won, Kitty Kelly second, 
Amasa third. Time 1:01L 

One mile — Spike won, Montallade second, William 
F. third. Time 1:42k 

Six furlongs — Lagorta won, Joe K. second, Girly 
Ducat third. Time 1:16). 

Three and a half furlongs — -Abba L. won, Honest 
John second, Big Dutch third. Time 0:41. 

July 23. Trotting — Montanus won in two straight 
heats, Almax second, Erudition third. Best time 2:24J. 

Six furlongs — Bill Bohmanson won, Auriffera second, 
Nimrod third. Time 1:16). 

Five furlongs— Waterscratch won, Huachuca sec- 
ond, Yellowstone third. Time 1:02). 

Seven furlongs — Adnoor won, Barney F. second. The 
Buffoon third. Time 1:30. 

One mile and a sixteenth — Jim Hale won, Sylvan 
Lass second, Domsie third. Time 1:48). 

Five and a half furlongs — Phil Archibald won, Limb 
of the Law second, Donna Bella third. Time 1:10. 

One mile and an eighth — Rainier won, Ace second, 
Sam Green third. Time 2:06. 

July 24 — Six furlongs — Yule won, Alaria second, 
Devereaux third. Time, 1:15). 

Three furlongs — Jack won, Pat Tucker second, Abba 
L. third. Time, 0:35. 

One mile and twenty yards — Algermain won, M. I. 
Rothschild second, Sisquoc third. Time, 1:44$. 

Four furlongs — Parazaide won, Graham Green sec- 
ond, Cayenne Pepper third. Time, 0:49. 

Seven furlongs— Montallade won, George H. Ketchum 
second, Virgie d'Or third. Time, 1:27$. 

One mile— The Buffoon won, Mr. Robinson second, 
Monteagle third. Time, 1:442. 



Cunningham Discharged. 



[Honolulu Republican, July 2.] 

In the decision rendered yesterday morning by 
Judge Wilson in the District Court, W. H. Cunningham ) 
the well known horseman, and J. A. Morgan, the 
blacksmith, charged with conspiracy to dope the horse 
Weller, the property of Prince David, were discharged. 

The opinion of the court was rendered orally. 
Judge Wilson maintained that there was a reasonable 
doubt in his mind regarding the guilt of the defendants 
in the case. The court did not believe that the prose- 
cution had made out a strong enough case to warrant 
the defendants being held for the Circuit Court. Tho 
judge also took occasion to refer to the testimony of 
Leeper, the only important witness for the prosecution. 
It was tho opinion of the court that the ovidence of 
Leeper was very contradictory and upon such testi- 
mony he failed to seo where any jury would convict. 

With the discharge of Messrs. Cunningham and 
Morgan it is believed that Prince David will not 
attempt to prosecute farther. On the other hand, it 
is reported that Mr. Cunningham is seriously consider- 
ing the filing of a suit for damages against the prose- 
cutors in the conspiracy case. Cunningham avers that 
his business interests have suffered as a result of the 
charges made against him. 



pay, the club will add $900, with an additional $100 in 
plate in case the winner should bo a horse ridden by a 
gentleman rider. Horses owned and hunted in Canada 
are eligible to tho race. Entries will close for the race 
on Monday, July 29th. 

Tod Sloan has gone into the racing business in 
France and has secured the Iservices of C. E. Durnell 
as trainer. He has registered his colors with tht. 
Steeple Chase society, as "yellow jacket, blue sleeves 
and black cap." J. Reiff won the first race for him 
the other day. 

Goodwin's Official Turf Guide, No. 7, tho first issue 
of the second volume of the work, has just been issued. 
The book carries the record of racing East and West 
up to dato, with the usual indexed tables of form. A 
new feature of the publication is a list of the jockeys 
riding in all parts of the United States, with the lowest 
weights that each can ride at. 

Messrs. Clay & Woodford have purchased through 
the American Blood Stock Agency the English stallion9 
Bridgewater and St. Evox. Bridgewater is a bay 
horse foaled 1894 by Hampton, dam Barmaid by Gal- 
liard, out of Loch Garry by Blair Athol, etc., and St. 
Evox is a bay horse foaled 1895 by St. Simon, dam 
Saltire by Bend Or, out of Stillwater by Cathedral, 
etc. Price private. 

Pink Coat took the lead at the last furlong post in 
the Wheeler handicap at Chicago July 20th, and, 
holding his advantage to the end, finished a handy 
winner by half a length from the heavily weighted 
Advance Guard. The Conqueror II. was a close third, 
being a neck behind the second horse. The attendance 
at Washington Park was 15,000. Twelve horses went 
to the post. Five to one was offered against any horse 
in the race. 

The registry of the racing colors of William K. Van- 
derbilt with the registrar of The Jockey Club, the 
body governing racing and turf affairs on the tracks 
in the Eastern States of the United States, last week, 
gave the first intimation of the intention of Mr. Van- 
derbilt to engage in racing in America. Promptly 
following the record of the colors claimed by Mr. 
Vanderbilt, white jacket, with a black hoop on each 
sleeve, and a black cap, the statement was made by 
persons who pretended to know that Mr. Vanderbilt 
had become tired of his plan of racing exclusively in 
France, and would send a choice lot of horses of his 
own breeding from his French breeding farm to Amer- 
ic ■ and campaign them on the New York tracks. He 
has been engaged in racing in France for the past 
three years, and formed an establishment there, be 
cause under the French law only French-bred horses 
can compete in races other than a few open events of 
the nature of the Grand Prix of Paris. To form this 
breeding stud, Mr. Vanderbilt, through an agent, 
bought fif ;een of the best bred mares that the late 
Pierre Lorillard would sell, the price at the time being 
stated at $50,000 These mares were sent to France, 
where Mr. Vanderbilt placed them at Maison-Lafitte, 
a great estate that he purchased for the purpose, while 
on the race-track at Poissy, which he also secured, he 
established training quarters -Last year the first of 
the horses of the Vanderbilt breeding raced, but with 
little success. In the fall of last season Mr. Vander- 
bilt followed the example of other European turfmen 
and engaged an American jockey, in Eddie McJoynt, 
but McJoynt rode for him only a part of this season, 
and a short time ago asked for and obtained his re- 
lease. The names of half a dozen well known trainers 
were mentioned in connection with the expected Van- 
derbilt stable in America, but no -positive announce- 
ment of an engagement was made. Mr. Vanderbilt 
fifteen years ago, was the reputed owner of several 
fair horses that raced in this country, but the owner- 
ship always was denied. He has been a constant 
visitor to races at the Sheepshead Bay track, however, 
and has been known to back his fancies with a great 
degree of success there, acting as his own betting 
agent. His fondness for the Coney Island Jockey Club's 
track may be in part explained by the fact that he is 
the largest stockholder in the club, his holdings, in 
fact, giving him practical control of the property, the 
most valuable of all the New York race tracks. 



Saddle Notes. 



The Coney Island Jockey Club has oponed an extra 
stake for the Autumn mooting at tho Sheepshead Bay 
raco track in the Rockaway Steeplechase Stakes, for 
hunters four years old and upward, that have been 
qualified under the rules of the Steeplechase and Hunt 
Association by being hunted regularly through tho 
season of 1900-1901, at special weights, with penalties 
and allowances. To the stakes of $25 each, play or 



Horse Owners Should Uso 
GOMBAULT'S 

Caustic 
Balsam 

The Great French Veterinary Remedy. 

A SAFE, SPEEDY AND 
POSITIVE CURE. 




SUPERSEDES ALL CAUTERY Or FIRING 

Impossible to produce anv scar or blemish. Tht 
»af"!St best Blister evor u<ed. Takes the plac< 
of all liniments for mild or severe fiction. Removes 
All Hunchos or Blemishes from Horses or Cattle. 

As a HUMAN REMEDY for Rheumatism,, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, Etc., itisinvamable. 
MIC PIIADAUTfC that one tablespoonful ol 
lit bUAHAN I Lt CAUSTIC BALSAM wil 
produce more actunl results than a whole bottle o> 
any liniment or spavin cure r \ixture ever made. 

Every bottle of Caustic L»alsam sold is Warraj 
ted to cive satisfaction. Price $ 1 .50 Per bottle. Hole 
dy druggists, or sent by expresr, chances Paid, with ful 
directions for ite.use. Send for descriptive circulars 
testimonials, eta.' Address 

tHE LAWKF.NOE-WILLIAMS CO., Cleveland, Ohi< 



8 



[July 27, 19OJ 



GUN 



At the Traps. 

The Olympic Gun Club live bird and blue rock 
medals, five of each, are now on exhibit at Clabrough, 
Golcher & Co.'s salesroom. The prizes are of gold, 
tasteful in design and beautifully chased. The trophies 
for the two championship classes are studded with 
diamonds. 

The regular monthly blue rock shoot of the Empire 
Gun Club will bring out a large number of trap shoot- 
ers to the club grounds at Alameda Point to-morrow. 



The blue rock bulkheads at Inglesido will be at the 
disposal of shooters who wish to smash a few clay 
pigeons for practice. 

The State Live Bird Tournament, under the auspices 
of the California Wing Club, Olympic and San Fran- 
cisco Gun Clubs, will be held Friday, Saturday and 
Sunday, August 30th, 31st and September 1st, on the 
association trap grounds at Ingleside. Except in two 
events, the Gold Dust trophy and the Fay diamond 
medal, the shooters will be handicapped in distance by 
the official handicapper, on a sliding scale, determined 
by the individual performance during each day. Ac- 
cordingly as a contestant shoots well or indifferently, 
after killing a certain number of birds, he will be put 
back a yard, or should he fail to connect with his 
pigeons, he is put forward a yard from time to time. 
The distance limit is from twenty-six to thirty-two 
yards inclusive. To penalizo the gun beyond the thirty- 
two yard mark was believed to practically handicap a 
shooter out of the contests, hence the limit at that 
point. Messrs. Geo. H. T. Jackson, J. J. Sweeney and 
Clarence A. Haight have started the preliminary work 
necessary and from all indications a large entry and a 
generous list of cash prizes, etc., will be given with a 
splendid program of events. 

The San Francisco Gun Club live bird shoot for July 
will give club members and pigeon shooters an oppor- 
tunity to grass live birds at Ingleside to-morrow. The 
tiual live bird shoot of the club will take place on Sun- 
dry, August 25th; the concluding club race will be at 
twenty-tive pigeons. The member making the highest 
score for the season will win an elegant diamond medal. 
The other members who have competed in tho six 
club races will be divided into four classes after the 
final shoot. The high gun in each class will receive a 
cash prize of $30 and $20 will be awarded to the second 
high gun. The classification will be arranged as fol- 
lows: The list of members who have shot up scores in 
the six club shoots, highest to lowest scores inclusive, 
will be divided into four equal parts. The two high 
guns in each class resulting will bo awarded the cash 
prizes. • The high average medal winner is barred 
from any money awards. In the four monthly shoots 
held already this season, out of a possible sixty, the 
scores stand in tho order givon below, it will be seen 
that Karney and Jackson are high men so far. Dr. 
Derby and C. A. Haight can tie the high guns by a 
straight back score, and C. A. Rosenberg with one 
clean back score would be high, by three birds, for the 
four shoots: 

March April May June Total 

Jackson, G. H. T 15 11 15 14 55 

Karney, J 15 15 18 18 55 

Klevesahl. E 14 18 * 12 

Murdoch, W. E 18 14 14 13 54 

Wands, E. A 13 13 * * 

Feudner, F 13 13 * 12 

Sweeney, J. J 13 lit 13 * 

Neustadler, N. H 13 14 14f 12 53 

Derby. Dr. A. T 13 14f 13 • 

King, F. W 12 9 * * 

Golcher, VV. J 12 12 * * 

Justins, H 12 12 lit H 46 

■•Wilson" 12 » • * 

Haight, C. A 12 14 14 * 

Roos, A 12 11 lit 10 44 

Forster. E.L 11 14 15 14 54 

Bruns, J 12 12 « * 

Weil, A. L 11 8 11 * 

Shaw, C. H 10 13 14 » 

Rosenberg, R C 14t 15 14 * 

Schultz, E. L 15t 12 « 11 

Feudner, M. 14f 11 15f 13 53 

Shields, A. M 14 * * * 

Gauld, G. G 13t 13 * * 

t liaclt scores shot up * Soores to be shot up. 

The initial tournament of the Avalon Gun Club at 
Catalina island was well attended by sportsmen. J. E. 
Vaughan was high average man and won the Tufts- 
Lyons challenge medal, Hotel Metropole trophy and 
purse. Dr. A. M. Barker was second high average 
shooter. A. M. Shields and T. L. Lewis of this city 
participated in several events. 

Following is the total score and average of the lead- 
ing contestants in the two days' shoot: Matfield 308 — 
80.2, Aloxander 259—75.0, Van Valkenburg 298—86.3, 
Me welly n 220— 03.7, Loud 268—77.7, Barker 310— 80.8; 
Vaughan 314—91.0; Wrisley 268—87.6; Gilbert 278— 
80.5; Orr 264—70.5. 

At Ingleside last Sunday some good scores were 
made at the live bird traps. The birds wero a very 
fair lot as a rule: weather conditions however were not 
enjoyable, a west wind and cold foggy day prevailing 
during most of the shooting. Mr. Haight killed two 
dozen birds very cleverly from the 32-yard mark. In 
this sboot Mr. Donohoe missed two and one pigeon 
dropped out. In a fifteen bird shoot Mr. Haight again 
shot a clean score, Mr. Donohoe lost a bird '-dead out." 
In a race at six birds, shooting from the 35-yard line, 
Donohoe killed straight beating Haight one bird, both 
shooters had previously tied with ten each in a twelve 
pigeon match. Two races between Mr. Donohoe and 
Dr. McConnell followed, Donohoe finally won on a 
straight, beating the Doctor by one pigeon. In this 
event Donohoe shot a strong race, making killing cen- 
ters with the first barrel on every bird. Geo. Sylvester, 
in shooting up a string of fifteen birds, lost the tenth 



over the wire fence. H. Justins lost three birds out of 
twenty-one, missing his sixth and eighth, the thirteenth 
hard hit, fell dead out of bounds. The scores made 
were the following: 

Twenty -four bird race, 32 yards rise — 

Haight, C. A 22222 21211 11121 11122 1211-24 

Donohoe. Ed 11222 11*11 20121 11111 2201—21 

Sylvester, G 21221 1111* 22122 w -14 

Justins, H 11121 Ow -5 

Fifteen bird race — 

Haight, C A 31-21112 11811 11122-15 

Donohoe, Ed 30-21111 21111 12*12-14 

Justins, H 311— 20221 2*222 11212—13 

McConnell, Dr 30—21111 10210 Olw — 8 

Twelve birds at 30 yards — 
Donohoe, E 21120 21112 2*-10 Haight, C. A... .22222 12210 20—10 

Six birds at 35 yards — 

Donohoe, E 121122—6 Haight, C. A 2*1122—5 

Twelve birds at 30 yards — 
Donohoe, E 11*21 12112 21—11 McConnell, Dr. .21111 11121 2*— 11 

Twelve birds at 30 yards — 
Donohoe, E Hill Hill 11—12 McConnell. Dr. . 11221 11*11 21—11 



The Olympic Gun Club monthly blue rock shoot at 
Ingleside last Sunday was but slimly attended, the fact 
that the weather was dreary and windy possibly ac- 
counted for the lack of interest shown by the members. 
The usual gold and silver bar competition, however, 
was indulged in; Will J. Golcher and M. Burnell each 
won a gold bar, the winners of silver bars were: A. J. 
Webb three, E. L. Forster two, H. Justins two, C. W. 
Debenham and C. A. Haight one each. In the first 
fifteen bird pool event, Haight and Forster divided 
first and second moneys, Webb, Debenham and Cooper 
cut up third money. Webb won first and Haight and 
Debenham divided second and third money in the sec- 
ond added money fifteen bird race. Forster and Webb 
with fifteen straight took first and second money and 
third was divided by Golcher, Haight and Justins in 
the third fifteen bird race. Webb was high gun in the 
regular club race. The scores in the several events 
were as follows: 
Club match, 25 blue rocks — 

Webb, A. J. t 11101 11111 Mill 11111 11111—24 

Haight, C. A 10111 11111 11111 10111 11111—23 

Webb, A. J.* 11111 11111 01111 11111 11110—23 

"Slade" 11111 11101 11111 01111 01111—22 

Forster. E. L 11111 11101 10111 11111 10110—21 

Feudner, F 11110 11111 11111 11101 00111—21 

Derby, Dr. A. T 11101 11010 10111 11111 11111—21 

Justins, H. *t 0011101011 11111 11111 11101—20 

Haight, C. A. * 01101 11111 01111 01111 10110—19 

Justins, H* 11101 11111 Ullll 01001 11011—19 

Weil, A. L 01111 01011 01011 01111 11001—17 

Golcher, W.J 10001 01111 00101 Hill 10111—17 

* Hack scores. t Silver bar. 

Fifteen birds, side pool, $5 added, three moneys — 

Haight, C. A 11111 11101 11111-14 

Forster. E. L 11111 10111 11111—14 

Webb, A. J 11111 11110 11011—13 

Debenham; C. W 01111 11111 10111—13 

Cooper, R 10111 11111 01111—13 

Golcher, W.J 11110 11110 10111—12 

Feudner, F 11011 11111 01101—12 

Justins, H 10101 Mill 11101—12 

Veil, A. L 11011 11110 11011—12 

Burnell, M 11100 11110 11110—11 

Robertson, A. W 10101 11010 11111—11 

Iverson.M.J 00010 11100 11111 9 

Fifteen birds, side pool. $5 added, three moneys — 

Webb, A. J.f 11111 11111 11111-15 

Haight, C. A 11110 11111 11111—14 

Debenham, C. W 11111 1111101111—14 

Golcher, W.J 11111 01111 11110—13 

Forster, E. J 11101 11111 01111—13 

Burnell. M 11111 10011 10111—12 

Justins, H 01101 11111 11011—12 

Robertson A. W 11101 11011 11110—12 

Feudder, F 11111 00110 11110—11 

Iverson.M.J 11111 11101 10011—11 

"Slade" 01111 11011 10110—11 

Derby. Dr. A T 10101 1011111011—11 

Weil, A. L 10011 OHIO 11011-11 

tSilver bar. 

Fifteen birds, side pool, $5 added, three moneys — 

Webb, A. J t 11111 11111 11111—15 

Forster, E. L.t 11111 Hill 11111—15 

Goloher, W. J 11110 11111 11111—14 

Haight, C. A 11111 11111 01111—14 

Justins, H 11111 11011 11111—13 

Debenham. C. W 10011 11111 11111—13 

Burnell, M 11110 11111 11110—13 

Iverson, M.J 10111 11111 11110—13 

"Slade" 11110 11101 11111—13 

Feudner, F 11101 11011 11101—12 

Derby. Dr. A T 11011 jllll 11010—12 

Weil, A. L 01111 01111 11011—12 

Robertson, A. W 10110 11001 11111—11 

Cooper, R 01111 01111 01001— 9 

tSilver bar 

Double birds — 

Webb. A. J 11 11 11 11 11 11—12 

Burnell, M 11 11 10 11 10 10—8 

Derby. Dr. A. T 10 10 10 11 11 11—9 

Justins, H 11 11 10 10 10 11—9 

Haight, C. A 11 10 10 11 10 10—8 

Feudner 10 11 11 10 10 10— 8 

Debenham, C. W 11 01 10 01 01 11—8 

Golcher, W. J 11 10 11 10 00 10—7 

Robertson, A. W 10 11 01 10 10 10—7 

Practice shoot, 25 blue rocks — 

Golcher, W. J .* 11111 11111 11111 11111 11111—25 

Burnell, M* 11111 11111 11111 Mill 11111—25 

Justins.Ht mil 11111 11111 1111101111—24 

Debenham, C. W 11011 mil 1111101111 11111—23 

Debenham, C. W.t 11111 11111 11111 01011 11111—23 

Haight, C.A.t 11111 11111 11111 10101 01101—22 

Derby, Dr. A. T 11111 11101 10111 mil 11011—22 

Derby, Dr. A. T 11111 11101 11111 101 11 11011—22 

Derby, Dr. A T 11101 11111 11011 10111 11111—22 

Mitchell, C.T 10111 11111 01111 01111 11111—22 

Sylvestor, G 11011 10111 11000 11111 11100—18 

Sylvester, G 10101 11010 11111 11111 00101—18 

Burnell, M 11111 11010 01101 10101 11101—18 

Sylvester, G. 00010 101 10 11111 11001 00111—16 

♦Gold bar. tSilver bar. 



The Sacramento Gun Club held the final blue rock 
shoot for the season at Eckhardt's Park on the 21st 
inst. 

The event of the day was the contest by the club 
members for the first class medal put up by W. H. 
Eckhardt, who had won it five times. Only the winners 
of the second and third class medals were barred. The 
prize fell to Mr. Gusto, with a score of 21 out of 25. 
Charles Palm secured the second class medal for the 
season, ^having (including Sunday's shoot) won it 
four times. Messrs. Davey and Beardsley tied for the 



third class medal, each having won it three times, and 
in the shoot-off Davey won with a score of 16 to 11 out 
of 25. 

For the first prize in the merchandise shoot, a 22- 
caliber rifle, there was a tie on twenty-two between 
Messrs. Davis and Maxwell, which they settled satis- 
factorily between themselves, Mr. Davis becoming the 
owDer of the rifle. Kindsberg, Stevens and Vetter tied 
on 21 for the second prize, a Victoria gun case, and 
Vetter won in the shoot-off. For the third prize a 
sole-leather shell case, Black and Bosco tied with 20 
each, and in the shoot-off Black won. Charles Palm 
took fourth prize, a cleaning rod, with a score of 19, 
and Shaffer won fifth, a hand protestor, with 18 breaks. 

Following are the scores of the several events: 

At ten blue rocks— Gusto 8, Eckhardt 8. Vetter 7, 
Stevens 7, Wittenbreck 9, Black 4, Davis 3. 

Club medal shoot at 25 blue rocks — 

Wittenbrock 01 1 10 11111 10110 1 1 100 01101-17 

Kindsberg 10110 21011 11110 mil 11101-20 

Black 01111 11010 11110 11111 10111-20 

vetter nooi inn loiiiuion 11111-20 

Stevens 10111 moo 11110 mill 01111—19 

Gusto 11m nun mil mm 11011—21 

P-' 1 ™ 10111 11111 1111100111 11111-22 

Shaffer 11m 10m mil lllll 00101— 21 

Maxwell (1111 Kllll imo 01011 01111— 20 

P» v is 01110 01001 llllionu 11111-19 

g?sco 11111 11111 11111 oouo inii-22 

Richards 00011 1 1 1 10 11110 01000 11111-18 

At 15 blue rocks— Gusto 11, Palm 13, Davis 11, Wit- 
tenbrock 12, Richards 8, Vetter 12, Shaffer 10, Eck- 
hardt 12, Stevens 14, Kindsberg 13, Black 11, Maxwell 
12, Bryan 13, Richards 8, Bosco 10. 

Merchandise shoot, 25 blue rocks— Kindsberg 21. 
Davis 22, Black 20, Stephens 21, Netter 21, Morgan 17, 
Schaffer 18, Belting 10, Maxwell 22, Richards 13, Palm 
19, Davey 16, Gusto 16, Eckhardt 20, Bosco 20, Beards- 
ley 13. 

At 15 blue rocks— Vetter 12, Maxwell 10, Davis 13, 
Eckhardt 11, Bosco 10, Gusto 14, Morgan 11, Palm 13. 



The last shoot for this season of tho Washington 
Gun Club took place Sunday at the Kimball & Upson 
grounds near the American River bridge. The club's 
next outing will be a shoot at doves, followed by a club 
stew. A summary of the scores made is the following: 
Match at 10 bluerocks— Rust 8, - Just 10, Woods 4, 
Reichert 9, Smith 8, Williams 9, Heilbron 7, Flint 6, 
Sharp 9, Skeels 6, Newbert 9. 

Match at 25 blue rocks— Hughes 18, Peek 17, Hartig 
15, Reichert 18, Magistrini 15, Rust 21, Heilbron 18, 
Flint 19, Williams 24, Derman 22; Just 18, Woods 19, 
Sharp 22, Kevchler 18, F. Newbert 25. 

Match at 15 bluerocks— M. Newbert 13, Heilbron 10, 
Reichert 13, F. Newbert 15, Marty 10. Rust 13, Flint 8, 
Williams 13, Hughes 13, Just 10, Peek 13, Derman 12, 
Sharp 13, Keuchler 10, Moon 3, Blair 11, Magistrini K, 
McManus 4, Smith 9, Woods 9. 



A live bird shoot at Cordelia last Sunday was held 
under the guiding hand of mine host Charley Hall. 
Several six, ten and twelve bird evonts were on the 
schedule. C. H. Shaw was high gun for the day. In 
a six bird match for creature comforts Hall beat Col. 
Hosmer by the small margin of one bird. In one six 
bird pool, six shooters dropped every bird, the purse 
was carried over and put up in a twelve bird race, the 
winners were C. H. Shaw and Andrew Jackson. The 
scores in the several events were the following: 

Match at 10 pigeons — 

Shaw, C. H 22222 12012-9 Jackson, G.H.T.. 21111 *1111— " 

Reams, C *22ll 12121—9 Jackson. A 2*1*2 11212—** 

Six bird pool, $2.50 entrance — 

Shaw, C. H 222221—6 Jackson, Geo 2122*2—6 

Jackson, A 202222—5 Hosmer, H. B 101021—4 

Six bird pool, $2.50 entrance — 

Shaw, C. H 222222—6 Mayfleld, S 121221—6 

Jackson, A 221121—6 Eckert.J 111221—6 

Jackson, Geo 212121—6 Hosmer, H. B 121012—5 

Reams, C 222222—6 

Twelve bird sweepstakes, $5 entrance — 

Shaw, C. H 11221 22222 22—12 Eckert.J 02121 21211 11—11 

Jackson, A 22112 22211 22—12 Hosmer, H. B .11*20 10111 01— 7 

Jackson, Geo.. .2111* 21111 21— 11 Mayfleld, S 020w — 1 

Reams, C 21121 10111 21-11 



Deer and Doves. 



Commencing on Thursday next, August 1st, it will 
be lawful to shoot bucks, the opon season under the 
State law will then prevail until October 1st. The new 
game law adopted by the last legislature cut short the 
deer season one month — under the old law open season 
commenced July 15ch and ended October 15th. In 
many counties prior to the passage of the game bill 
now in force, the open season, as prescribed by the law 
then in force, was shortened more or less. In some 
cases the open season provided for by a connty comes 
within the dates set by the law now in force. There 
are, however, many county ordinances on the records 
which are now invalid, as thoy conflict altogether or 
in part with the State law. In the following counties 
ordinances were adopted and in force last year, which 
it is believed are still in effect, viz: Humboldt, the use 
of dogs is prohibited; Orange, August 1 to September 1; 
San Benito. August 1 to September 15; San Luis 
Obispo, the use of dogs is prohibited; San Mateo, 
August 1 to September 15; Santa Barbara, August 1 to 
August 22, use of dogs prohibited. In Marin county 
it is probable that close season will be in force com- 
mencing September 15, thus shortening the season by 
two weeks. 

In many districts, comparatively easy of access from 
this city, deer hunting ground has been posted. 
Owners and farmers have been lad to believe by inter- 
ested parties that the "game hog," "ground sluicer" 
and "pot hunter" will soon be stalking abroad and 
will then destroy fences, set fire to fields or shoot live 
stock. Another idea that has recently been planted 
deeply in the minds of ranchers and owners of tracts 
of land upon which may be found a greater or less 
amount of game to be hunted, is, that the wild game 



July 27, 1901] 



9 



comprises "a valuable food supply for the people" and 
should be taken care of accordingly. This means that 
the general sportsman, lacking a lucky acquaintance or 
not having the proper influence to secure a permit, will 
have to pay a fee for the privilege of hunting over 
some one else's possessions. While this prospect is not 
so particularly bad in principle it will, however, work 
disastrously against the sportsmen at large. Should 
this custom prevail to any general extent, the solution 
of the question will be settled by the establishment of 
a preserve system that will in a few years embrace all 
of the shooting countrv, particularly deer huntiug dis- 
tricts, in the State. While it is very apparent that 
eventually the onlv manner by which game may be 
had in sufficient numbers for the sportsman to enjoy a 
shoot, will be through protection and propagation on 
preserved lands, the time for a change to this system 
is not by many years at hand, and so radical a change 
now is harsh and unnecessary and in the nature of an 
imposition and hardship upon the majority of sports- 

men. .,, ., , . 

The open season for doves will prevail from August 
1st until February 1st. All of the county ordinances 
in vogue last season are in whole or partly in conflict 
with "the present game law and consequently of no 
effect now. . 

Doves are reported to be plentiful in many sections. 
In the vicinity of Marysville, where the birds have 
heretofore been numerous, the report is that they have 
apparently deserted that section. 

An Incident in the Marin Hills. 

The western portion of Marin county, extending 
northerly from tho shadows of Mt. Tamalpais, is a 
series of ridges and mountains whose rugged sides 
and verdure clad slopes are escalloped with deep and 
tortuous gulches, wooded canyons and interspersed 
with picturesque valleys. In this region deer abound. 
The adventure described below by our correspond- 
ent took place within twenty-five miles of this city 
and is interesting in many respects. In this section 
deer have been rigidly protected, does and fawns 
have, as a general rule, enjoyed immunity from mo- 
lestation. The ability of bucks to fight off a dog 
is well known, but it falls to the province of but 
few observers to witness an occurrence such as is here 

glVeD ' Olema, July 11, 1901. 

Editor Breeder and Sportsean— A little thing 
happened this morning under my observation that 
might possibly interest some of your readers. "To 
reap and sow and plow and mow, to be a farmer's boy," 
is not all a farmer's life. He must haul in his harvest. 
In "Merrie England" it is customary to set apart a 
day as a holiday, to commemorate the ingathering of 
the crops, this day is called the Harvest Home. 

This morning just about noon I was driving four 
horses along a steep side hill, two men were gathering 
up the scattered hay and pitching the cocks of hay 
into the wagon preparatory to carrying it home. 
Turning my head I saw within one hundred feet of the 
crest o! the hill a doe and a spotted fawn. "Mira! 
Mira!" (see! see!) I called to my Spanish men at arms. 
Looking up from their work, they hied my Pointer- 
dog onto the pair, mother and fawn. At the first ap- 
proach of the dog away went the fawn like a flash, out 
of sight. Not so the mother. She faced the oncom- 
ing dog. shook her head, stamped her forefoot, gave 
battle and drove back the canine intruder. The doe 
then complacently walked back on to the ridge. Soon 
after the doe had reached her point of observation, 
the spotted fawn came out of the brush, moved around 
a stump in a semi-circular direction, to meet the maternal 
protector. Don, the Pointer, was again put after the 
doe by the men; their curiosity was greatly aroused, 
the doe showing that she was eminently capable of 
protecting herself and progeny. Again the fawn 
skipped afar to the brush for safety. Not so "mater 
cervus," again she faced the foe gallantly, charged the 
dog and drove him back to within forty feet of our 
wagon and then, when in reaching distance, she struck 
the Pointer a vicious hard slap with one of her front 
feet which made him retreat, howling with pain, for 
safety under the wagon. The doe then turned and 
swaggered up the hill, a veritable bullying rowdy in 
carriage, on the crest shb wheeled about, looked down 
upon the surprised outfit with an air akin to contempt, 
snorted a farewell defiance and then quickly bounding 
away disappeared, in quest probably of her spotted 
offspring for whom she had battled so bravely, risking 
freedom and for whose welfare and safety she showed 
she would havo given up her life. Payne .Tewett. 



Coming Events. 




Coming Events. 



July 1— Striped bass season opened. 
July 1— Black bass season opened. 

July 27— Saturday Contest No. 8. Class series. Stow lake 
!:30 P. M. 

July 28— Sunday Contest No 8. Class series. Stow lake, 10 A. M 



Aug. 18— Olympic Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 
July 2!' -San Francisco Gun Club. Live birds. Ingleside. 
July 2b— Empire Gun Club shoot. Blue rocks. Alameda 
Junction. 

Aug. 1— Deer season opens. Closed season commences Oct. 1. 
Aug. 3-Grass Valley Sportsman's Club. Trap shoot and "camp 
stew." 

Aug. 4— California Wing Club. Live birds. Ingleside. 

Aug. 4— Union Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 

Aug. 4— Lincoln Gun Club. Blue rocks. Alameda Junction- 

Aug 4— Antler Gun Club. Blue Rocks. Empire Club grounds 
Alameda Junction. S 

Aug. 11— Olympic Gun Club. Live birds. Ingleside. 

Aug. II— San Francisco Gun Club. Blue rocks. iDgloside. 

Aug. 11— Empire Gun Club Blue rocks. Alameda Junction. 

Sept. 8, 9— Empire Gun Club. Blue rock tournament and mer 
chandise prize shoot. Alameda Junction 

Sept. 29— Union Gun Club. Live birds. Ingleside. 



The Fishin' Fever. 



'Long about this time o' year I sort o' get a wish 
I c'd jis' cut loose a spell an' fish, an' fish an' fish; 
Gittin' all-fired weary of th' stuffy, sweaty town, 
Want to go where I can hear the water tricklin' down 
Thru a medder summers an' in underneath a tree, 
Where th' ol' sun kind of peeks an' shimmers down at me, 
Set there by a pool an' smoke an' think an' fish. W'y Sir, 
'Long about this time o' year that's wuth a livin' fer. 

One day saw a little gal a dabblin' of her feet 
In a gutter stream that made a puddle in the street, 
Sittin' there upon the curb an' keepin' mighty still, 
Had a bent pin on a line an' fishin' fit to kill. 
I stood there a achin' fer to hug that kid an' say 
Your all right, an' this ol' man is feelin' jis' that way. 
'Long about this time o' year fer workin' I ain't fit; 
Got the fishing fever on an' cain't git over it. 

Want to git out all alone an' set a dreamin' dreams. 
Want to smell the pine trees an' to hear the mountain streams; 
Want to git on top th' range an' waller in th' snow. 
Then look down an' see the world a mile or two below; 
There is somethin' magic in a breath o' mountain air, 
Makes a feller feel somehow that God Himself is there. 
'Long about this time o' year, w'y, don't you understand? 
Want to go to Nature an' to grab her by the hand. 

Denver Mews. , 

Ply-fishing on the Truckee is now in the best condi" 
tion and will continue for some time. 



proval and will be issued at as early a day as practi- 
cable. The list is almost identical with that issued by 
the S. F. Kennel Club last May, the changes in regard 
to classes being of minor importance only. The cash 
inducements are liberal— $5.00 to first, $2.00 to second 
and a medal or diploma to third is a satisfying con- 
cession. Generous cash prizes will also be offered to 
handlers. 

The vexed question of judging seems to have been 
settled by the proposal to select resident talent. It is 
believed that among the eligibles. Mr. L. A. Klein will 
be invited to judge the big breeds, pet, toy dogs and 
all terriers, excepting Fox Terriers, which breed can 
be looked after in the ring by no one better qualified 
on tho Coast than Charles A. Sumner, of Los Angeles, 
a Fox Terrier fancier and breeder well known and able. 
The sporting breed would be properly looked after by 
Mr. J. B. Stoddard, of Encenita, San Diego county, 
should that gentleman accept the invitation to judgo 
Pointers, Setters and Spaniels. 

Mr. David J. Sinclair has been appointed Superin- 
tendent of tho bench show. His connection with bench 
shows for many years past and personal acquaintance 
with most of the fanciers on the Coast is a strong en- 
dorsement that tho preliminary routine and detail and 
the conduct of a successful show in Los Angeles is 
assured. 

A partial canvas among the prominent lights of dog- 
dom here is encouraging for a large entry from this 
city. Mr. L. A. Klein will take down a string of dogs, 
for exhibitson only, that will be remarkable in many 
.respects. Some of the dogs in his string have gone 
over the Eastern circuits several times and won out 
over all competitors. Others again have cleaned out 
everything in their class in England before coming 
over here. The advertisement appears on page 12. 



H. E. Skinner & Co., 416 Market St., have a new lino 
of sporting rifles and small bore shotguns for deer and 
dove hunting. Special fixed ammunition and camping 
equipments for the season invite sportsmen's attention. 
A full line of ladies and gentlemen's hunting boots in 
stock. 



Striped bass fishing is improving. Catches are re- 
ported at numerous points around the bay. The fish 
caught in the estuary are tainted with petroleum from 
the tank ships loaded at the oil wharf. 



An antidote for mosquito poison has been published 
by Consul General Guenther who writes from Frank- 
fort: "Professor Doctor Voges, Director of the National 
Board of Health at Buenos Ayres, according to Ger- 
man papers, has found a remedy for mosquito bites. 
He states that he discovered it by accident during his 
trip to Paraguay to study the pest. He had been sup- 
plied with all sorts of remedies, among them napthalene, 
an article of no value whatever against the insect, but 
on using it for mosquito bites, he found it of surprising 
effect It neutralizes the poison, even when the bitten 
spot is greatly inflamed. If fresh bites are rubbed 
with napthalene, «no swelling follows. The professor 
considers napthalene almost a specific against mosquito 
bites." 



The striped bass angler baits his fishin' hook 
With big, fat clams as he has dug. 

And while he waits for bites with anxious look 
Yer hearsthe gurgle gurgle uv his jug. 



tafe^sa CSfeSsa tsJsSsa tsSSSsa tjJc^sa tjKSsa fcfSSsa CsSSsa fc?s£^E3 



KENNEL. 



Coming Events. 



Aug. 20— Pacific Advisory Board. Monthly meeting. J. P 
Norman, Secretary. 

Bench slums. 

Aug. 27, 28, 29 , 30— Pan-American Exposition Dog Show, Buffalo, 
N. Y. E. M. Oldham, Superintendent. 

Sept. 2, 3, 4, 5— Toronto Industrial Exhibition. Eleventh annual 
Dog Show, Toronto, Can. W. P. Fraser, Secretary and Superin- 
tendent. 

Sept. 3, 4, 5, 6— Columbia County Agricultural Society. Inaug- 
ural Show, Chatham, N. Y. M. T. Mason, Secretary. 

Sept. 11, 12, 13, 14— West Virginia Exposition and State Fair 
Association. Annual Dog Show, Wheeling. W. Va. G. O. Smith, 
Manager. 

Sept. 19, 20, 21— Nanaimo Agricultural Association. Bench show. 
Geo. Norris, Secretary, Nanaimo, B. C. P. K. L. Rules. 

Sept. 24, 25, 26, 27— Middlesex East Agricultural Association. 
Dog Show, Wakefield, Mass. G. B. Kirkpatrick, Secretary Bench 
Show Committee, Boston, Mass. 

Oct. 2, 3, 4, 5— District Agricultural Association. Los Angeles. 
Bench show. D. J. Sinclair, Superintendent. A. K. C. Rules. 

Oct. 8, 9, 10, 11— Texas Kennel Club Dog Show, Dallas, Texas. 
Sidney Smith, Secretary. 

Oct 8, 9, 10, 11— Danbury Agricultural Society. Dog Show, Dan- 
bury, Conn. James Mortimer, Superintendent. 



Doings in Dogdom. 

We have an order for a King Charles Spaniel bitch. 
Particulars can be obtained from the Kennel Editor. 



Mr. Byron Erktnbrecher of Los Angeles informs us 
of the recent loss of his Bull Terrier Teddy Roosevelt. 
On page 12 of this issue will be found a notice of $50 
reward for the arrest and conviction of the party or 
parties now having the dog in possession. We hope 
Mr. Erkenbrecher will soon have his dog. 

Fifty Setters and thirty Pointers, a total of eighty 
entries for the Manitoba Derby, is a record entry. The 
list is also a record one for quality. The All- Age and 
Championship Stakes close August 1st, these stakes 
promise as well for entries as the Derby. The trials at 
Carmen this year will the largest ever run by bhe club. 

The Ladies Kennel Club was organized at a meeting 
held in the office of the Breeder and Sportsman 
on Friday evening, July 19th. Mrs. A. A. Roi, who 
has a penchant for Maltese Terriers, was chosen tem- 
porary chairman; Miss Belle Woodward, who fancies 
the "Holy breed," was elected secretary. Mrs. M. 
Tromboni, a lady who favors Dachshunds, and Mrs. 
N. P. Rosenberg, who banks on Irish Terriers, were 
appointed a committee on constitution and by-laws. 
Communications were received from a number of ladies 
desirous of joining the new club. A meeting will be 
held again at the same place Friday evening, August 
2d, at 8:15 p. m. 

We note with regret the death of a staunch, good 
old Pointer, a dog known and liked by every sportsman 
in this city, Dave Thorn's Nick. Nick was a black dog 
of the old Pape stock, being a son of James Watson's 
Black Joe and Black Bess — two noted black Pointers 
brought out here by Mr. Watson some twelve years 
ago. Rex, a litter brother to Nick, was given to Crit 
Robinson by Dave Thorn when both dogs were very 
young puppies. Mr. Robinson in a recent letter men- 
tions Rex as being on his last legs and ready to suc- 
cumb — as did Nick, to the decline of old age. Nick has 
been the canine chum and hunting companion of Dave 
Thorn for about eleven years. An illustration of the 
dog's faithful character is shown in a picture taken by 
James Maynard, Jr., during a quail hunting trip in 
Alameda county. Mr. Maynard 's black Pointer Thorn, 
a son of Nick, and Clarence Haight's Setter Starlight 
are shown standing in the road in front of two sports- 
men, both dogs intently facing the camera. Old Nick 
is seen to the left, standing rigid and steadily watching 
a fence gate — he knew his friend and master was inside 
the enclosure and he had thought for no one nor any- 
thing else until Uncle Dave came outside again. 



A Bench Show at Los Angeles. 

The local fancy aro well pleased to know that the 
bench show at Los Angeles under the auspices of the 
Sixth District Agricultural Association is now an 
assured fixture. The officers of the association aro 
E. T. Wright, President; F. G. Teed, Secretary; H. J. 
Fleishman, Treasurer; C. E. De Camp, H. J. Fleish- 
man, E. T. Wright, S. N. Androus, G. B. Barham, 
C. M. Baker, N. A. Covarrubias and Martin Nash 
Board of Directors. A dog show will be a new del 
parture as one of the features of tho Los Angeles Fair- 
the proposition to hold tho show in Los Angeles orig- 
inated with progressive spirits in the South and im- 
mediately found general support. Under tho present 
guaranteed auspices, and particularly as an exhibition 
of this nature has not been held in Los Angeles for 
four years or more, the project has taken a firm hold. 
The show will bo given under A. K C. rules, for which 
the proper credentials havo already boon issued by 
Mr. J. P. Norman, Secretary of the Pacific Advisory 
Board. The premium list has been submitted for ap- 



We note in Kennel Registry to-day a notable whelp 
ing of Dachshundes. On tho 18th inst. in the kennels 
of Mr. J. C. Berret, a prominent San Jose fancier, 
throe dogs and one bitch puppy were whelped by L. 
A. Kloin's Champion Venlolo. Mr. Berret reports 
that the matron and young ones are doing nicoly. This 
is the first litter of Mr. Klein's California bred dogs, 
they were sired by Col. Walter S. Martin, Jr.'s 
Rex M. Mr. Klein brought this bitch purposely 
to San Francisco to breed to this particular dog. This 
mating is an exposition of high art in breeding. A 
careful perusal of the pedigrees will illustrate why it 
should be so considered. Rex M. is by Champion 
Phenomenon Roinecke (imported from Germany by 
Mr. Arthur Fromblingof Chicago, and it is a true type 
of the German working Dachshunde) out of Champion 
What's Wanted (imported from England by Mr. Klein, 
and a bitch of pronounced old English type and qual- 
ity). Champion Venlolo, by Champion Venlo's Best 
Man (Protessor Puck ex Champion Venlo's Squaw, 
second dam Champion What's Wanted) out of The 
Shrew of Vonlo, a full sister to Rex M. 

It is a noticeable fact that a number of very good 
specimens of Dachs can bo found in this city. Among 
the recont arrivals of good ones can be mentioned Prof. 
C. E. Strasburger's Heisel. Mr. Klein who always had 
a penchant for tho "long variety" since he was a youth, 
breeding and showing winners in Gei many when he 
was a school boy, would particularly like to moot fan- 
ciers interested in the Dachshund and invites Dach- 
shund men to meet him at his office Room 7, 420 Mont- 
gomery street. 



10 



®h£ ^rector rotfc gtpoxt&man 



[JULY|27, 1901 



Glenwood Kennels' Bull Terrier bitch Newmarket 
Queen is heavy in whelp to Woodcote Wonder. 

Norfolk Truman's first Coast progeny arrived here 
on the 12th inst. in charge of W. J. Foster's Lillian 
Sage, a good brood bitch, too. 

Louis Schneider, who used to own Old Jacob, a noted 
dog in his day, has purchased a bitch puppy, one 
month old, by Monk of Frisco out of Nellie G. This 
litter of English Setters belonging to Stange and Hen- 
ning are said to be splendid young puppies. 



P. D. Linville is banking on a prospective litter of 
English Setters out of his good bitch Love Knot by 
Henry L. Betten's Cavalier. Love Knot is by Mercury 
out of Sweetheart's Last. This litter will be bred in 
the purple most surely. The lines on both sides are of 
the best. 

Plumeria Fancy, the handsome red Cocker bitch 
winner of first, limit, open and winners here in May 
will soon be sent East by C. E. Plume to the Buffalo 
Pan-American bench show. The fact that Ben Lewis 
will handle the local crack shows the good judgment 
of Mr. Plume and is also a criterion of merit in the 
bitch's favor. Mr. Lewis has the reparation of not 
wasting any talont on undeserving material. 



It has always been more or less of a puzzle why "just 
dog" owners and breeders of dogs should foster the 
idea that the male sex of the genus canine is preferable 
to the female as a house companion. Much of this 
antipathy to the bitch is due to imagination or mis- 
information, says Tfie American Stock-Keeper. Of 
course, the main objection, unless one is so situated 
that the trouble in finding a safe retreat during the 
periods of oestrum is reduced to a minimum, is the 
care at the period named. This, happily, covers but a 
month or so out of the twelve. There are always facil- 
ities in every house, and even in a flat some corner can 
be found, where the family pet may be secured for the 
time. In the village home, where the bitch is allowed 
free run, either the afore-suggested corner is always 
available or a room in the attic, or, failing that, a box. 
This naturally entails a little extra care, but is it not 
worth while when one considers the more tender and 
undivided and sympathetic affection which a bitch 
devotes to its master or mistress than does the male. 
The male has his affairs, takes an interest in the canine 
politics of the village and at times his duty to his mas- 
ter is but lightly considered, while his manners are not 
always to bo relied upon. Mind, we do not decry the 
male dog as a companion but the raison d'etre of our 
complaint is that there should be such an inconceiv- 
able preponderance of leaning towards his sex in pref- 
erence to the "ladies. " The short periods when tho 
bitch is in retirement are very much more than offset 
by the greater cleanliness of the female in the house. 
Some dogs are downright nuisances and no one knows 
how a puppy may turn out, and, in any case, as much 
trouble in training is necessary as would offset the 
month's care of the bitch at the time named. Then 
again, in tho matter of sport, which sex is the keener 
on a bit of vermin or sport? — the female. It is well 
known that a bitch pack of hounds usually affords the 
faster, keener sport. Again, supposing one's inclina- 
tion and facilities of menage run to several dogs, and 
there is no comparison between the sexes in the care 
and watching they will require, for the bitches are not 
prone to quarrel and more bitches will dwell in har- 
mony together than dogs. Then let the voice of the 
breeder, and the kennel journalist who leads so many 
to the dogs, be lifted in favor of the "ladies." Many 
a good dog is "paled" because it is a bitch, and all on 
account of this foolish predilection for the male sex as 
loving companions. 



The Trimming of Dogs. 



The trimming of dogs for the passing purposes of 
the public show has always been a vexed problem for 
exhibitors, says London Field editorially; they halt 
between opinions — some defending the custom, while 
others, unfortunately the minority, deprecate it. The 
advocates of the custom argue that they have as much 
right to trim the hair or coats of their dogs as their 
neighbors have to subject their horses to similar treat- 
ment, with no better object than to display their lead- 
ing features to the best advantage. It is perhaps a 
good thing that the horse and the dog are not in this 
matter on an equality. The supporters of dog trim- 
ming, indeed, might find a better analogy in the curi- 
ous device of coloring sheep for glorification at shows, 
but they should note that there is a movement on foot 
to abolish the practice, which has for so long boon fol- 
lowed by flockmasters in connection with certain varie- 
ties of sheep. The fact remains that the trimming of 
many breeds of dogs, such a Terriers, has latterly been 
advanced to an extent that approaches an art. A re- 
cent writer, a large exhibitor and breeder of Scottish 
Terriers, says that tho sides of the dog's head are 
" trimmed " down pretty well to the bare skin until 
the animal has been thoroughly transmogrified, and if 
the majority of our leading Terriers were shown abso- 
lutely aw naturcl they would find it a difficult thing to 
"struggle into the money." This refers to but a sin- 
gle variety of the dog, one less trimmed than some 
others. Though the custom is to some extent encour- 
aged by the Kennel Club, it is impossible to say what 
latitude is allowed. The exhibitor, therefore, does not 
know how far he may go. It is to be deplored that the 
judges themselves are so mixed up with the custom of 
trimming and with the Kennel Club that they are in- 
capable of taking action with regard to the former. 
As the matter stands at present, tho sin is not so much 
in its commission as in its discovery, and, so long as 
the operator is clever enough to hide his handiwork, 
the breed or variety upon which he manipulates is the 
sufferer, and not, as justice would ordain, himself. 



Scottish and Irish Terriers. 

Tho claim that the Irish Terrier is the Scottish Ter- 
rier under another name, and for which warrant is 
found in books published twenty years ago, is ono that 
will not stand the test of investigation. The reason is 
that the dog we now know as the Scottish Terrier was 
not then called by that name, and what was then 
classed as a Scottish Terrier was a rough dog of about 
the size of the wire-haired Fox Terrier, not particu- 
larly hard in coat. Any red or sandy dog with a 
rough coat, including head as well as body, was in 
those days called a Scottish Terrier in England, and 
our present day Scottish Terrier had various local 
names, and was generally considered a variety of Skye 
Terrier. In fact, the best picture we have seen for a 
present-day Scottish Terrier of that period appears in 
the late Hugh Dalziel's British Dogs, and is there styled 
a Sk/e Terrier. Mr. Dalziel was a Scotchman from 
Ayrshire, if we mistake not, and was well acquainted 
with the dogs of Southern Scotland, and yet he makes 
no reference to the commonly called Scotch Terrier of 
that time as a breed, for there was no breed that was 
recognized as such. Neither does Stonehenge touah 
upon them. If wo say that the Irish Terrier was 
developed from the nondescript, commonly called 
Scotch Terrier, it is a very different thing from alleg- 
ing at this dato that bocause such was the case, if it 
was so, that the Scottish Terrier was the origin of tho 
Irish Terrier. 

Apart from that we have what every one can see for 
himself, that the Scottish Terrier is very much lower 
on the log and that he is entirely different in color 
from any other variety except tho Skye. The Irish 
Terrier, on the other hand, is the highest on the leg of 
any variety, and his color, so far as there is any record, 
was never that of the Scottish Terrier's which, when 
not very dark, are white. The special chroniclers of 
these two national breeds have taken pains to assure 
us that for at least one hundred years the present-day 
tpye was what was then the rule as to size and build; 
and where, may we ask, was the parting of the ways 
which led to their being so established. 

If it is correct to assume that the Scottish Terrier is 
the progenitor of the Irish Terrier, why was it when 
the quoted authorities so stated or guessed, they gave 
no account or description of the Scottish Terrier from 
which the Irish Terrier descended. It would be only 
natural for a novice seeking information as to the 
various breeds from Stonehenge or Vero Shaw, when 
he comes across the assertions that in all likelihood 
the Irish was merely the Scotch Terrier in a new guise, 
to seek for somo account of the breed from which the 
descent was made, and to find that no such breed is 
described, must be somewhat puzzling and difficult to 
understand. It is true that in Vero Shaw we find the 
author in his few introductory remarks prefacing a 
description of the Scotch (Scottish) Terrier by Mr. 
Morrison, for at that time Mr. Shaw knew so* little 
about the breed he could write nothing of personal 
knowledge, alleging that there is fair ground for as- 
suming that the Irish originated from the Scotch 
Terriers, but if any one who possesses his book will re- 
fer to the illustration on page 124 of two alleged Irish 
Terriers of 187;"> he will see what Mr. Shaw and writers 
of that period meant by Scotch Terriers. He quotes a 
dissenting opinion as to these being Scotch Terriers, 
to the following effect: "Look at the head of this dog 
(Kate) — if Scotch blood is not stamped on it then I 
know nothing. Look at the long hair on the forehead, 
with the vein or equal division in the centre. Look 
again at the long hair on the muzzle and under the 
jaw. And if, as I say, this does not denote the Scotch 
cross and a good deal of it, then I know nothing about 
the points which constitute an Irish Terrier. The 
surest sign of Scotch blood in a rough Terrier is the 
length of hair on forehead. Another thing which 
goes to prove the Scotch cross is the vein or furrow 
running at the center of the forehead. This is not 
met with in the Irish Terriers." The furrow referred 
to is the parting of the hair in the center. We thus 
find that the Scotch Terrier, as then generally under- 
stood, was a dog rough all over, as we have stated. 
Yet when we turn to the description of the Scotch 
(Scottish) Terrier, a few pages further on in Vera 
Shaw, we find that the head must be "free from long, 
soft or woolly hair or topknot. Shaw, in saying that 
Scntch emigrants took their dogs to Ireland and 
established the breed, and then publishing the state- 
ment that the Scottish Terrier was a breed of the 
islands and maintained on the northwest of Scotland, 
contradicts himself, for the people of that section did 
not emigrate to Ireland and take the Presbyterian re- 
ligion with them. The Southern Scotch undoubtedly 
did, but they had none of the Scottish Terrier breed 
to take with them. The fact is Shaw knew practically 
nothing about the Scottish Terrier, and it was that 
dog he meant when he wrote his book. 

Little as Shaw knew of the Scottish Terrier, Stone- 
henge knew less. In fact, a more over-rated reputa- 
tion as an all-round canine authority was never ac- 
corded anyone. On the Greyhound and coursing he 
was almost the authority of England, and he had good 
knowledge of Hounds, Setters and Pointers, but out- 
sido of those his knowledge was from casual observa- 
tion. We will take his third edition of the Dogs of the 
British Islands, 1878, as proof. Book III. is "Terriers 
(other than Fox and Toy).' Chapter I. is "Nonde- 
script Terriers." Chapter II., "Special Breeds of 
Rough Terriers. The Skye — drop and prick-eared — 
Dandie Dinmont, Bedlington, Yorkshire, Irish Ter- 
riers." Chapter III. is confined to smooth Terriers. 

A few extracts from the letterpress will show that 
the statement of his lack of knowledge is fully war- 
ranted outside of any facts with which we are person- 
ally acquainted: "Since the first edition of this book 
was published a considerable change has taken place 
in the type of several of the Terrier family. At that 



time the Yorkshire Terrier was represented by an ani- 
mal only slighly differing from the old Scotch dog, his 
shape being nearly exactly the same, and his coat 
simply differing in being more silky. Such an animal 
was Mr. Spink's Bounce, as introduced in the accom- 
panying engraving." This engraving shows what we 
would now-a-days call a rough mongrel Terrier, and 
he is somewhat larger than a white Terrier which 
stands this side of him. and which is described as fol- 
lows: "Mr. Pierce's Venture represents what is now 
called the rough Fox Terrier, but formerly known as 
the white Scotch Terrier." Because this was said by 
Stonehenge in 1878, would anyone now-a-days assert 
that the wire-haired Terrier is descended from the 
Scottish Terrier? 

The third rough Terrier in the group resembles in 
his prick ears and size the Scottish Terrier, but his 
head is not smooth, though not so rough as to cover 
or hide the eyes. We will now extract from Chapter 
II., under the head of Skye Terriers: "As both definite 
strains recently described by Mr. J. Gordon Murray 
under the various names of 'Movstads,' 'Drynocks' and 
'Camusennaries, ' I confess I am not a little sceptical. 
In any case, it is premature to attempt a description 
01 thorn until some further evidence is afforded, which 
has not yet appeared, although his (Mr. J. Gordon 
Murray s) article and portrait of a specimen brought 
P/ l ? lm ,. 1 to London appeared several months ago, and 
if the likeness is a good one a very ugly brute he is." 
Now, this likeness was that of Otter, a very typical 
present-day Scottish Terrier, referred to above as be- 
ing illustrated by Dalziel as a Skye Terrier, and of 
which Dalziel himself writes— and ho had seen the 
dog: "Otter has nothing but his decidedly 'varmint' 
look to recommend him. He is decidedly ugly, and to 
ask fanciers of dogs and lovers of the beautiful in these 
animals to give up the charming Skye Terriers, 
brought to their present perfection bv careful and 
judicious breeding, and take in their place such a dog 
as Otter, I can only consider one of those ponderous 

things known as a 'Scotch joke' To ask us 

to change the coats of dogs principally kept for their 
beauty, one of the great charms of the modern Skye, 
for the harsh, uncultured one as covers Otter would be 
equivalent to asking the descendants of Highland gen- 
tlemen settled in the South to give up all the advan- 
tages of modern civilization and culture and betake 
themselves to the garb of a Dunniewassal of the last 
century; but all this is giving Mr. Murray the benefit 
of his assertion, that a short coat is the correct thing 
and the original, which I do not grant." 

These extracts are not meant to in any way dispar- 
age the Scottish Terriers which Otter so well repre- 
sented, but to demonstrate convincingly that when 
writers of that period said or implied that tho Irish 
Terrier was akin to the Scotch Terrier it was not 
tho Otter kind they meant. To go back to Stonehenge 
and his assertion that Otter was a very ugly brute, we 
find appended to the article on the Irish Terrier con- 
tributed by Mr. Ridgway, illustrated by the good 
bitch Spuds, a footnote by Stonehengo that it was in- 
serted at the request of influential breeders of the 
strain, there being twenty-live signatures to the de- 
scription and scale of points, and he then adds: "I am 
still, however, of opinion that tho dog differs in no 
respect from the rough Scotch Terrier commonly met 
with throughout England during the early part of the 
present century." It was really the influence of Mr. 
Dalziel, who wrote much of Stonehenge's book, that 
secured the insertion of Mr. Ridgway 's article in the 
third edition of the Dogs of the British Islands.— Field 
and Fancy. 



The following field trial organizations have joined 
the Interstate Championship Field Trial Association: 
Illinois Field Trial Association, W. R. Green secretary, 
Marshall, 111.; Michigan Field Trial Association, C. D. 
Stuart secretary, Grand Rapids, Mich.; Missouri Field 
Trial Association, L. S. Eddins secretary, Sedalia, Mo.; 
Independent Field Trial Association, H. S. Humphrey 
secretary, Indianapolis, Ind.; Iowa Field Trial Asso- 
ciation, Louis Verveer secretary, Des Moines, Iowa; 
Kentucky Field Trial Association, Dr. F. W. Samuel 
secretary, Louisville, Ky.; North American Field Trial 
Association, R. Bangham secretary, Windsor, Ont.; 
South Dakota Field Trial Association, Olav Haugtro 
secretary, Sioux Falls, S. D.; Ohio Field Trial Asso- 
ciation, Carey E. Baughn secretary, Washington C. H., 
Ohio. Charles B. Cooke, St. Louis, Mo., is secretary 
of the Interstate Association. 



Kennel Registry. 



WHELPS. 

W. J. Foster's Fox Terrier bitoh Lillian Sage, whelped July 12, 
1901, four puppies (3 dogs) to N. H. Hickman's Norfolk Trueman 
(Ch. Norfolk Veracity-Norfolk Jewell). 

L. A Klein's Bull Terrier bitch Nancy (Ch. Cordona-Ch. Edge- 
wood Topsy) whelped July 18, 1901, nine puppies, to O. O. Heyden- 
feldt's Bayview Brigadier JBayview Bob-Bayview Belle.) 

E. Courtney Ford's Fox Terrier bitch Legs and Feet (The Leg- 
nard-Elmwood Electa) whelped July 14, 1801, three puppies (1 dog) 
to George Bell's Fordham (Norfolk Veracity-Norfolk Greno Charm). 

W. J. Foster's Fox Terrier bitch Village Belle whelped July 12, 
1901, four puppies (1 dog) to same owner's Storm Signal (Rippon 
Stormer-Lillian Sage). 

L. A. Klein's Dachshund bitch Venlolo (Ch. Venlo's Best Man- 
The Shrew of Venlo) whelped July lb, 1901, four puppies (3 dogs) 
to Col. \V. S. Martin, Jr.'s Rex M. (Ch. Phenomenon Reinecke-Ch. 
What's Wanted). 

J. L. Wadleigh's Collie bitch (Skipper-Delia Fox) whelped July 
17th, four puppies (2 dogs) to O. J. Albee's Beau Brummel (Pensarn 
Christopher-imp. Queen's Bounty). 



VISITS 

Alec Truman's English Setter bitch Peach Nugget (Caliente- 
Peach Mark) to H. G. Oxnard's Merry Monarch (Mercury- 
Johanna), July — , 1901. 

Tudor J. A. Tiedmau's English Setter bitch Cummiug's Lady 
(Ch. Joe Cumming's-Sport's Destiny), to Heather Hill Kennels, 
Victoria. B. C, Llewellin Drake (Dick Wind 'Em— May Wind 'Em). 

O. Case's (Port Gamble, Wash.), English Setter bitch Fannie C. 
to Mt. View Kennels Buck Galdstone (Ch. Count Gladstone IV-Lady 
Rodschatl), June 1, 1901. 

Chas. J. Hoga's (Milbrae, Cal.l, English Setter bitch Blanche H. 
(Marie's Sport-Dolly Y.) to Mt View Kennels Buck Gladstone 
(Ch. Count Gladstone IV— Lady Ro-'schaff), June 16, 1991. 

Mt. View Kennels' English Setter bitch Outcast (Cavalier-Peach 
Nugget) to same owners' Buck Gladstone (Ch. Count Gladstone IV 
-Lady Rodschafl), July 4. 1901. 

SALES. 

Nairod Kennels sold the black Cocker Spaniel bitch Nairod Imp 
(Champion Viscount-Nairod Chloe) to L. P.Olker, July 24, 1901. 



July 27, 1901] 



11 



THE FARM. 



Breeding Age for Heifers. 



There seems to be present in the minds 
of most dairy farmers two ideas when 
they come to consider the question of the 
right time to breed a heifer for her first 
calf. 

Those who have thought the most thor- 
oughly on the subject generally agree that 
the main consideration to be kept in mind 
is to start the working of the maternal 
organs at an early age, so that the internal 
development of the cow shall be along 
the line of milk giving. They realize that 
there is a chance that the development of 
flesh making will overwhelm the tendency 
to milk secretion unless the heifer is 
started on that road at a sufficiently early 
age. So with men who think along specific 
dairy lines, who are after the best dairy 
cow they can produce, the heifer is bred 
young, say at 12 to 15 months of age. 
One thing more, however, must be done. 
It is not enough that the heifer should be 
bred at the right period ; she must not be 
allowed to become too fleshy before 
breeding, else she may to difficult to get 
in calf and the tendency of her secretions 
started in the wrong direction. She should 
be kept in a thrifty, growing condition, 
and her grain feed from calfhood up mainly 
oats and bran and other food of a protein 
character. There is nothing better in the 
way of a food for the proper development 
of a heifer than skim milk. Most farmers 
relinquish feeding the calf skim milk at 6 
months of age. It can be profitably fed 
until she is 10 months old. 

The other idea spoken of at the begin 
ning of this article is the question of the 
size of the future cow. And so farmers 
in whose minds there is the preponderat 
ing idea breed their heifers at 18 to 20 
months of age. 

They believe that early maternity will 
reduce the size of the cow somewhat, so 
they take the risk of reducing the milking 
power in order to secure more size. 

In some places in Europe the practice 
prevails of breeding the heifers at 15 
months and holding them back for the 
second calf until they are 3% years old. 
But this practice is in vogue mainly 
among men who are anxious to produce 
the best beef animal. They recognize the 
value of early maternity in securing a 
good start in developing milk secretion 
and to prevent future barrenness; but 
what they are after in the main is size. 

On the whole we believe it the wisest 
course for those who wish first class dairy 
cows to breed the heifer at 15 months of 
age and keep her steadily at her work 
thereafter, so long as she will breed and 
is a profitable cow, with about sixty days' 
intermission between calves. — Hoard's 
Dairyman. 

Tax on Sheep. 



Judge Morrow of the United States Cir- 
cuit Court has issued an order which will 
be of great interest to sheep men who 
use mountain ranges during the summer. 
Several of the mountain counties have a 
special tax of 10 cents per head on all 
8 heep and lambs in the county owned by 
non-residenta. The case in question was 
hrought by P. J. Flanigan against Sierra 
county and August Burch, License Col- 
lector of that county, for an order restrain" 
ing them from collecting this tax on 30,. 
000 sheep owned by plaintiff. Judge 
Morrow granted the order on the ground 
that the tax is unconstitutional, as it dis- 
criminates in favor of resident owners and 
does not impose a license on hogs, cattle 
or horses grazing in that county and 
owned by non-residents. 



The report of a recent Hereford sale 
held at Sydney, Australia, shows that this 
breed is also in high favor in that country. 
The top price at the sale was 175 guineas, 
or about $894, and a number of animals 
were disposed of at a figure not far below 
this. 



Sheep Notes. 



The ewe flock should have the best 
pasture on the farm. 

Keep salt in the pastures where sheep 
can help themselves. 

Sheep should have a change of pasture 
as often as possible. 

The best mutton is obtained from sheep 
kept growing. 

Sheep always do better when kept quiet. 
Do not frighten them. 

Regular feeding and steady growth make 
good wool and good lambs. 

Many good sheepmen claim that Bheep 
are healthier than any other stock. To 
make the most out of sheep, they should 
be kept a series of years. 

Sheep restore to the soil a large propor- 
tion of the elements they take from it in 
grazing. 

A good way of cleaning up a field in 
which sprouts are growing is to turn in 
the sheep. 

Sheep are close grazers and on this ac- 
count ought not to be allowed pasture in 
the meadows. 

To secure the best profit with sheep the 
wool, mutton and lambs must do their 
part. 

The weight of the fleece and the quality 
of the mutton has more to do with profit 
than anything else. 

If sheep's hoofs get long they should be 
trimmed. A little attention to this may 
save much trouble. 

A week of scant feeding or of exposure 
to storms will show its effect by making 
weak places in the staple. 

Scab, foot rot, liver trouble and catarrh 
are all diseases that are induced by lack 
of thrift and lack of care. 

Properly managed sheep will eat up and 
convert into a valuable product much 
coarse food that would otherwise be 
wasted. 

A short-legged, short-bodied sheep is 
often heavier and will produce more wool 
than one that looks considerably larger. 

Sheep, through the peculiar nutritious- 
ness of their manure and the facility with 
which it is distributed, are valuable aids 
in renovating the productiveness of the 
land. 

A fairly well graded flock of ewes bred 
for a few years to none but a first class 
ram will in a short t me give as fine a flock 
as any could desire for practical purposes. 

The only way to keep a flock up to a 
high standard and to keep the standard 
raising higher all of the time is to cull 
and cull. Poor mothers, poor eaters and 
weak constitutioned sheep should be fat" 
tened and marketed. 



Do not try to crowd too many chickens 
into one coop or give too many to the care 
of one hen. Much of the mortality among 
young chickens is due to this cause, and 
many think themselves fortunate to raise 
one-half the chickens that are hatched out, 
while others by having vigorous breeding 
stock, taking care to keep coops clean and 
free from vermin, to give only wholesome 
food, which is not necessarily the fancy 
foods of boiled eggs, oatmeal, boiled rice, 
bread crumbs, etc., which are recom- 
mended by many, and by overcrowding in 
coops do not lose one in a hundred. 

A rule is becoming common in Scottish 
show yards that no man shall act as judge 
in any ring in which any of the animals 
shown shall at any time have passed 
through his hands as owner. Much dis- 
cussion pro and con has been indulged in 
touching this rule and some managements 
have refused to endorse it. 

A friend of the cow comes to the front 
with the following defense of the innocent 
and unsuspecting victim of misplaced 
confidence, the common, every-day cow : 
There has been more ingenious cussed- 
ness developed in connection with the 
single item of cows' milk and its products 
than in any other thing produced on a 
farm. The dairymen early learned to 
water and skim it, the milkmen who 
peddled it to dose it with formaldehyde 



and salicylic acid to keep it from souring, 
the butter maker to work casein and 
water into the butter and then the steer 
man and the hog man and the cotton seed 
man each took a hand to beat old Bossy 
out of her vested rights, while only a few 
commission men can handle butter and 
keep the ten commandments. Think of a 
well bred cow, one of the creator's best 
gifts to man, having as competitors the 
pump, the steer, the hog, the southern 
oils mills, the Chicago stock yards and 
northern drug stores. The wonder is that 
she is willing to do business at all 

There is great difference in the quality 
of dairy salt, due botli to difference in 
chemical composition and to the physical 
properties of the salt. The salt particles 
range in size from large blocks known as 
rock salt to a fine powder that gives a 
smooth surface when a knife is pressed to 
it. The coarse salts are much slower in 
dissolving and require longer working to 
work in the salt, which injures the grain 
of the butter. Salt that is too tine is also 
open to as serious objections Ii the 
butter is worked too dry and a large 
amount of fine salt used, the salt will 
separate and form a crust on the surface 
of the butter. A salt that cakes or be- 
comes quite moist when exposed to the 
air is not good salt for dairy purposes, as 
it usually contains impurities in the form 
of lime or magnesia. 

The first beef cattle for the season of 
1901 to leave Klamath county for the Cali 
fornia market were shipped from Louis 
Gerber's Brookvale Farm in Klamatl 
county, Oregon, on the first of July. There 
were 300 head in the drove, which were 
in charge of T. J. Offield. The cattle were 
in fine condition. 

I never have as yet discovered any way 
of keeping my farm in a state of fertility 
as well as by keeping cows, says a farmer. 
The day has gone by when we can depend 
upon unaided nature to supply the ele- 
ments taken by man from the soil from 
year to year. We have been unmerciful 
in our robbery of the land with which we 
have been intrusted, relying upon nature 
in some mysterious way to make up to 
the soil the fertility we have taken away ; 
and she has been more than kind to us in 
this respect; but now at last she has 
drawn the line and says to us that we 
must give back something of the much 
we have stolen in years gone by. Dairy- 
ing enables us to do this more effectually 
than we can possibly do in any other way. 

Germany eats considerable horse meat, 
and her dealers deplore the present high 
price of horses in America which pre- 
cludes the exportation of horse quarters- 
The Germans have gone into horse-steak 



eating with their eyes wide open, and the 
history of the custom is not uninteresting. 
In 1847 the Society for the Protection of 
\nimals at Frankfort gave its first "fresh 
horse-meat dinner." Thereafter, as soon 
as a horse was killed, the Society adver- 
tised the sale of the meat at four cents 
per pound. It is only in recent years that 
Frankfort has had a horse-meat restau- 
rant. Frankfort slaughters, at the pres- 
ent time, about one thousand horses an- 
nually, employing a separate slaughter- 
house for this purpose. 

The proper time to market lambs has to 
be determined by the condition of flesh 
and not the size. One year after another 
it does not pay to hold for higher prices 
when they are once ready to go. If the 
feeder has the capacity of foretelling a 
better market ha would better sell out 
those that are already iat and replace with 
good growers. While the markets just 
now are somewhat depressed future pros- 
pects seem to be good. The country is 
not overstocked with sheep and the people 
are more and more forming the mutton- 
eating habit. 

Col. W. H. Fulkerson & Son, Jersey- 
ville, 111., proprietors of the Hazel Dell 
herd of Shorthorns, sold recently to Claus 
Spreckels, the sugar king of the Pacific 
Coast, six head of cattle, five yearlings 
and one two year old. These were all 
sired by a pure Duke bull and out of cows 
of the Duke, Wild Eyes, Barrington, 
Young Phyllis, Western Lady and Lady 
Elizabeth families. 



Secretaries! Managers! Matinee Clubs! 
Use the Improved Automatic 

TIME ANNOUNCER 




H. C- HESS, Putintii ami Manufacturer. 
P. O. Box 287, CINCINNATI. OHIO. 

Examine machine nowon exhibition at the office 
of Breeder and Sportsman. 



CALORICYITAOIL 



Cures lameness and soreness in man and beast 
Ask any horse trainer about it. At all druggists 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 



DKALKRS IN ■ 



55-67-59-61 First Street, S. F. 

Telephone main 199 




JAY-EYE-SEE 

Mr. J. I. Case, (Hickory Grove Farm, home | 
of Jay-Eye-See) Itacine, Wis., says: " After try- 
ing every known remedy, I remoyed a large j 
Bunch of two years standing from a 3-year old 
filly, with three applications of 

Quinn's Ointment. 



It is the best preparation I have ever used or heard 
of. I heartily recommend it to all Horsemen. 

We have hundreds of such testimonial*. 
Price $1.00 per packace. 
Ask your druggist for it. If he does not keep li wo 
will send prepaid on receipt of price. Address 

. B. EDDY & CO., Whitehall, N. Y. 



TRY IT. 



MANHAJRK 



\wnrded <Jold Medal 
tt « ailloriiia Mute 
Knlr I*<»2. 

I Kvery horse owner 
I Who values his stuck 

■ should constantly have 
I h supply of It on I and. 
lit Improves and keeps 

■ stock in the pink of con- 



dition. 

Manhattan Food Co 



RRD BALL BRAND. 

It Positively Cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion 



:ir>.'i Kolsnin St., San Francisco 

^8k your grocers or dealers for it. 



and type written ready for framing 
Write for prices. Breeder and 
Sportsman, 36 Geary street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Pedigrees Tabulated 



12 



[July 27, 1901 



Dried Blood for Calves. 



Dried blood is not only good for a weak 
calf, but is an excellent remedy for any 
calf subject to scours. Recently a test 
was made with five calves that happened 
to be scouring at the same time. With 
two of these, dried blood was fed, after 
reducing the regular feed of milk. With 
the other three, the dried blood was fed 
without changing the supply of milk. In 
the former case the calves recovered from 
the scours after two feeds; in the latter 
after three feeds. With the seventy head 
of young calves under experiment at the 
Kansas Station during the past year, 
there has not been a single case of scours 
that dried blood failed to check. 

In feeding dried blood, a teaspoon fill at 
a feed is a great plenty. This should be 
continued until the scours disappear. In 
case of a weak calf, the allowance may be 
gradually increased to a tablespoonful at 
a feed. To prevent the dried blood from 
settling to the bottom of the pail, where 
the calf will be unable to get it, it may he 
stirred in the milk while the calf is drink- 
ing, or the milk and blood may be fed im 
mediately after being thoroughly mixed. 
Since dried blood is such a cheap and 
effective remedy, it will pay anyone who 
raises young calves by hand, to have a 
little available, wheuever a calf shows 
signs of disorders in its digestive tract. 
It can he obtaited from any of the large 
packers. When ordering, state that the 
blood is wanted for feeding purposes. 



A condition from which butter might be 
termed oily may come from several causes. 
The principal oils going to make up nor- 
mal butter fat are olein forty per cent., 
stearine and palmatine fifty per cent. 
Olein is the factor that tends to make 
butter soft, the melting point being con- 



siderably below that of normal butter, 
while stearine ami palmatine are the fac- 
tors tending to make it hard, the melting 
point being considerably above that of 
normal butter. The combination of the 
two in the given proportions makes butter 
with good texture When from any cause 
there is an excess of any one, then we 
have butter which is either too hard or 
too soft. 

In all lines of live stock the tendency is 
more and more towards early maturity, 
and it is to be the type of hog best suited 
for that purpose that we should give en- 
couragement. I believe, as a rule, we are 
doing so. This type is as far removed 
from the little, under-sized, fine-boned 
kind as it is from the big, coarse fellows. 
Intensive rather than extensive farming 
is the tendency, and the hog bred for 
quality and early maturity is most surely 
to be the hog of the future.— W. M. Mc- 
Fadden. 



Top dressing the land with stable com- 
post by mulching the grass roots helps to 
subserve moisture, which is fully as im- 
portant in stimulating the growth o f feed 
as is the fertilizing principle that it im- 
parts. Shade trees in the pasture judic- 
iously placed also serve the same end, and 
at the same shield the cattle from the 
sun's ravs. 



$50 REWARD 

Will be paid for the arrest and conviction of the 
person who has now illegally in his possession the 
Bull Terrier " Teddy Roosevelt "—all white color, 
cropped ears, well scarred head and weighs about 
fifty pounds. Address 

BYRON KKKF.M5RKCHER, 
Los Angeles, t ill 

Or Bkekdkh and Sportsman ofllce. 



Notice to Bookmakers and Poolsellers 

Pool Privileees for State Fair 

SACRAMENTO 

September 2d to 14th, 1901. 

CEALED BIDS WILL, BE RECEIVED FOR 
f all betting privileges at the State Fair at the 
office of the Secretary of the State Agricultural 
Society, Sacramento, Cal., until Saturday, Aug. 
in, 1901, at 11 A. M. Two harness races and four or 
more running races each day. 
\l ( HON POOLS ON HARNESS RACES. 
HOOK ISETTLNG ON HARNESS RACES. 
BOOK BETTING OX RUNNING RACES. 
FIELD BOOKS ON B1 NNTNG RACES. 
COMBINATION BOOK ON ALL RACKS 

Bids may be offered on each or for the whole. A 
deposit of 10 per cent must accompany each bid. 
The Board reserves the right to reject any and 

all bids. 

GEORGE W. JACKSON, Secretary. 



INAUGURAL 

BENCH SHOW 

A. K. C RULES) 

Sixth District Agricultural Association 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

October 2, 3, 4, 5, 1901. 

ENTRIES CLOSE SEPTEMBER 230. 

E. T. WBIGHT, K. G. TEED, 

President. Secretary. 
I>. .1. SINCLAIR, Superintendent. 

Office— 22fi S. Spring St., Room 208, Los Angeles. 



Mark Levy & Co. 



MARK tEVY 
Expert Cutler 
and Fitter... 
Fine Suits 
from 

$25.00 up 




Only the 
Best Help 
Employed... 
All work 
done on the 



36 Geary St.. S. F. Rooms 19-20 Phone Grant IS6 



LOW 

Summer Excursion 
Ratesjast 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

offers those low round trip rates : 

ON SALE BOUND TRIP 

August 20-21 Louisville, $77.50 

i u T^ M L ! Buffalo, 87.00 
September 5=6 s 

September 5-6 Cleveland, 82.50 

These rates apply from California main-line 
points. Many miles shortest— many hours fastest- 
finest scenery— choice of routes— limited trains— 
personally conducted tourist excursions— 

ACROSS THE CONTINENT 

Details at the nearest office 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 



HEALDS 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
mercial school on the Pacific Coast. 18,0(J0 gradu- 
ates; 25 teachers: 90 typewriters; over 300 students 
annually placed in positions. Send for catalogue. 

E. P. HEALD, President. 



Los Angeles Race Meeting! 

DISTRICT AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION No. 6. 

Sept. 28th to Oct. 12th, inclusive. 



The following Running Stakes will close August 17. 1901, 



No. 1 — Los Angeles Derby. 



No. 3 — The Rose Stake. 



No. 5 — The Lynch Stakes. 



For Three Year Olds. Entrance »10. $91 addi- 
tional to start: a cup and $400 added, of which $80 to 
second and WO to third. Colts to carry 133 pounds, geldings 119 pounds, Allies 117 pounds. To be run 
Saturday, September 38th. One and one-fourth miles. 

Mrt 1 Innalhan Tlnh Qtnkpc *" r T "° v, ilr ° 1<iH Entrance So. $15 addi- 

HU. L JUIIdllldll CIUU OKXIYCS. tional to start; 1225 added, of which $50 to second 

and 835 to third. Weights 115 pounds. Maidens allowed five pounds. To be run Monday. September 
30th. Five furlongs. 

For Three Year Olds and upwards. For non-winners 
of a race (at the time of closing) of more than $50 in value 
this year, 1901. Entrance 85. $15 additional to start; $350 added, of which $50 to second and $35 to 
third. Weights for age. Maidens allowed five pounds. To be run Tuesday, October 1st. One mile. 

Wr» A fanivtr'nio HanAtran For All Ages. Entranee »5. $15 additional to 
lw» * VapiSlIdllU IIQUUlCap. 8tart . fe-,>o added, of which $50 to second and $25 to 

third. Weights to be posted two days prior to the race. For horses owned south of Tehachipi. To 

be run Wednesday October 2d. One mile and fifty yards. 

For Three Year Olds and upwards. Entrance 

•15. $20 additional to start: $250 added, of which $50 to 
second and $25 to third. Three year olds to carry 102 pounds, four year olds 110 pounds, five year olds 
and upwards 113 pounds. Winners at this meeting to carry five pounds extra. Beaten non-winners 
at this meeting, allowed five pounds, maidens ten pounds To be run Thursday, October 3d. Onemile 

N ft fx Piret AttPtTint <stflWpC A Handicap for Two Year Olds. Entrance 

llO. U rirsi \UUIIUl oldMSt. »5. $1.5 additional to start: $335 added, of which 

$50 to second and $35 to third. Weights to be posted two days prior to the race. To be run Friday, 

October 4th. Six furlongs. 

No. 7— Southern California Handicap. IZ™*™^* *t $* d adT 

tional to start; $350 added, of which $50 to second and $35 to third. Weights to be posted two days 
prior to the race. For horses owned south of Tehachipi. To be run Saturday, October 5th. Ono and 
one-sixteenth miles. 

Anirolina HanHiran For Mares of All Ages Enlranee • .*» 
\ll iS LIIIId IiailUliap. tional to start; $350 added, of which $50 to second and 
$25 to third. Weights to be posted two days prior to the race. To be run Monday. October 7th. One 
mile and fifty yards. 

For Three Y ear Olds and up- 
wards. Entranee 95. $10 ad- 
ditional to start; $225 added, of which $35 to second and $15 to third. Weights to be posted two days 
prior to the race. (There will also be an extra race given for Jumpers). To be run Tuesday, October 
8th. One and one-fourth miles. 



No. 8- 



No. 9 — The Sea Breeze Hurdle Handicap. 



CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR FOR 1301. 
SACRAMENTO 

SEPTEMBER 2nd TO 14th, INCLUSIVE. 

ENTRIES TO CLOSE SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1901. 

All Races to be contested at the State Fair on days to be here- 
after designated by the Board of Directors. 



No. 10 — Orange Belt Handicap. 



For Three Year Old Fillies. Entranee So. 

$30 additional to start; $250 added, of which $50 
to second and $35 to third. Weights to be posted two days prior to the race. To be run Wednesday, 
October 9th. One mile. 

N« II Conta Anita Ctal/ac For Three Year Olds and upwards. Entrance 
1>0. II — OHIIKI Alllld oldl\LS>. S5 . $15 additional to start; $350 added, of which 
$50 to second and $35 to third. Non-winners of this year allowed five pounds. Maidens, if three years 
old, five pounds; four years old, eight pounds additional. To be run Thursday, October 10th. Seven 
furlongs. 

Kn XI W/elrrht H u ll/l i, "l m For Three Year Old- and up" arils Entranee •5. 

110. XL VYll",lll liailUIld". $•>(> additional to start; $300 added, of which $50 to sec- 
ond and $25 to third. Weights to be posted September 28th. Winners after weights published, five 
pounds extra. To be run Friday, October 11th. Two miles. 

NO. 13 Hotel Van NuyS Handicap. fionafto Mart 1 .' For'a sUver *up presented 

by Milo M. Potter, Esq., with $300 added, of which $50 to second and $25 to third. Weights to be 
posted two days prior to race. To be run Saturday, October 12th. One and one-sixteenth miles. 

For Conditions, see Entry Blanks. 



The following Running stapes will close August 3, 1901, with the Secretary. 
Remainder of Running Program, for which Liberal Purges will be given, will be 
announced September 1st, aud will provide for four or more Running Races each day : 

Plash ^tflkp For AU Ages. Entranee »IO, to accompany nomination: $20 addi- 
I lasil oiaiYw. tional for horses not declared by 4 p. m the day preceding the race: $400 
added by the Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third. Non-winners of three races this year, if 
three year olds and over, five pounds; non-winners of two races, seven pounds: and non-winners of one 
race ten pounds. Maidens, three yearsold allowed five pounds; four yearsold and over, seven pounds 
additional. Six Furlongs. 

TUq Qhaftpr V.'llimr <t'iL p For Two Year Olds. Entrance SI O. to accom- 
1I1C OlldllCI OCI1III& OldtYC. pany nomination; $15 additional for colts not de- 
clared by 4 p. M. day preceding race; with $300 added by the Society, of which $50 to second and $25 to 
third. Horses may be entered not to be sold, and carry rule weight. If entered to be sold for $1000, 
allowed three pounds; $700, six pounds; $400, ten pounds. Winners of one race after closing of stake to 
carry three pounds extra; of two or more, seven pounds extra. Maidens beaten three times, allowed 
five pounds; four or more, seven pounds. Value to be placed on starters through entry box by 4 p. m. 
day before race. Six Furlongs. 

Sacramento State Fair Selling Stake. JZr£ hr £ t ?;X„ tf^cZ£- 

pany nomination: $20 additional for horses not declared by 4 P. M. the day preceding the race: $400 
added by the Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third. Winner to be sold at auction. If for 
$2000 to carry rule weight; if for less, ono pound allowed on each $100 to $1000, thence two pounds for 
each $100 to $400. Selling price to be placed on starters through entry box by 4 p. m. on the day pre- 
ceding the race. A winner of a stake race or three or more races of any value after olosing of stake, 
to carry five pounds extra. Maidens allowed seven pounds. One Mile. 

Th(» Vifirtnr Stflkp Kor Three Year Old* and upwards Entranee ft I O, to 
I UC » IIIIIUI OiaiYC accompany nomination; $20 additional for horses not declared by 
4 p. M. day preceding race; with $400 added by the Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third. 
Stake to be named after winner if Vinctor's time (1:40) is beaten. A. non-winner of a stake race in 
1901. or a race of the value of $500, allowed, if a non-winner of five races other than selling races, five 
pounds. Maidens seven pounds additional. One mile. 

C linnv Qlnnp ^tflkp For Two Year Old Fillies Entranee »I0, to accompany 
Ollllliy ^lupc OiaiYC nomination; $15 additional if not declared by 4 p. m. the day pre- 
ceding the race; $300 added by the Society, of which $50 to second and $35 to third. Weights five 
pounds below the scale. A winner of a stake race in 1901, or a winner of three or more races of any 
value, other than selling races, five pounds extra. Non-winners of two races allowed four pounds. 
Maidens allowed seven pounds, and if such are the produce of a mare that has not produced a winner 
at the time of starting, ten pounds. Maidens beaten three or more times since closing of the stake, 
allowed five pounds, and if not placed second or third, seven pounds additional. Five furlongs. 

A Handicap for Three Year Old. and upwarda. 
Entranee SIO, to accompany nomination, with $20 addi- 
tional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. day preceding race; with $400 added by the Society, of which 
$70 to second and $30 to third. Weights posted at 12 M. day preceding race. A winner of a race other 
than a selling race, after the weights are published, to carry five pounds extra. One mile and a 
furlong. 

The California State Fair Annual Stake. • iT 

company nomination; $20 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. M. the day preceding the race; 
with $500 added by the Society, of which $100 to second and $50 to third. Weights posted by 12 m. day 
preceding race. A winner of a race, other than a selling race, after the weights are published, to 
carry five pounds extra. Six furlongs. 

1 lie Prpcirlpnt'c <v< A Handicap for Three Year Olds and Upwarda. 

1 IIC riCSIUCIU S OiaiYC. Ent.ance »15. to accompany nomination; with $25 addi- 
tional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. day preceding race: $500 added by the Society, of which $10n 
to second and $50 to third. Weights posted by 13 M. day before race. A winner of a race other than a 
selling purse, after the weights are published, to carry five pounds extra. One and one-quarter miles. 

The State Agricultural Society's rules to govern except where conditions are otherwise. All 
declarations and claims for allowances due at 4 p. m. day preceding race, unless otherwise specified 
in conditions. Owners and trainers will be held responsible for same. Entrance and declaration 
money to go to winner. No added money for less than four starters in different interests. In selling 
races, beaten horses not liable to claim. Right to use starting gate is reserved- 
Entries must state name, color, sex and pedigree of the horse, with racing colors of the owner. 



E. T. WRIGHT, President. 



FREEMAN G. TEED, Secretary. 



The Governor's Stake. 



GEO. w JACKSON, Secretary California State 
Agricultural Society, Sacramento, Cal. 



A. B. SPRECKELS, President, 



July 27, 1901] 



13 



TRACK 
HARNESS 

################ 



The O. K. TRACK HARNESS is the Best Looking, Lightest and 
Strongest for the money. All Important Parts Lined with Raw- 
hide. . lexible Saddle, with Breast Collar and Breeching, or Two 
Minute Attachment Any style Reins Your choice of Bits. Hand 
made. Can't be beat. Price, - $40.00 



The Finest LAMB'S WOOL COOLER, 84x90, $5.00 [Tweed's Celebrated Liniment, $5 per gallon 

The Best Wool SWEAT BLANKETS, extra large, $7.50 Sole Agents for<; Prof. Robiquet's Liniment, $1, $3 and $5 per bottle 

The Lightest and Best Rawhide Steel-spring HOPPLE $10.00 [ 0. K. Paste, 



Heels, Scratches, and Galls of all 
SAMPLE FREE 



We are Headquarters 

for Everything 1 in the Horse Goods line. 



J. O'KANE 



10 WARREN ST. 
NEW YORK. 



Write for Catalogue. 



26-28 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



I 

it? 



TRACK 
HARNESS 



FIRST ANNUAL MEETING 



-OF THE- 



Santa Rosa Racing Association 



-AT THE 



SANTA ROSA RACE TRACK 

SIX DAYS, August 12 to 17, 1901, inclusive. 
ENTRIES CLOSE SATURDAY, AUG. 3, 1901 

Two or More Running Races Each Dav, to Close Over Night. 

GUARANTEED STAKES FOR TROTTERS AND PACERS. 



TROTTING. 

HORSES TO BE NAMED WITH ENTRY. 



2:40 Class Trotting-, 
2:27 Class Trottiner, 
2:20 Class Trotting-, 
2:16 Class Trotting-, 
2:14 Class Trotting, 

P. H. QU1NN, President. 



$500 
$400 
$400 
$450 
$500 



PACING. 



HORSES TO BE NAMED WITH ENTRY. 



2:30 Class Pacing-, 
2:25 Class Pacing, 
2:20 Class Pacing, 
2:17 Class Pacing 
2:12 Class Pacing, 



$400 
$500 
$100 
$450 
$500 



For Conditions see Entry Blanks. 'Address all communications to 

THOS. BONNER, Secretary, Santa Rosa, Cal. 



$8500 Guaranteed. 



Additional Stakes for Trotters and Pacers. 



$8500 Guaranteed. 



Los Angeles Fair and Race Meeting, 1901. 

DISTRICT AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION No. 6. 

Southern California's Great Racing Event. Thirteen Days-September 28 to October 12, 1901. 

GUARANTEED STAKES FOR TROTTERS AND PACERS. 



ENTRIES TO CLOSE SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1901, WHEN HORSES ARE TO BE NAMED AND ELIGIBLE. 



No. 19. 
No. 20. 
No. 21. 
No. 22. 
No. 23. 
No. 24. 



TROTTING STAKES. 

2:17 Class Trotting 

2:20 Class Trotting 

2:25 Class Trotting 

2:27 Class Trotting 

2:29 Class Trotting 

2:35 Class Trotting 



.$700 
$700 
.$700 
.$700 
.$700 
.$700 



PACING STAKES. 

No. 25. 2:11 Class Pacing $800 

No. 26. 2:16 Class Pacing $700 

No. 27. 2:19 Class Pacing $700 

No. 28. 2:21 Class Pacing $700 

No. 29. 2:23 Class Pacing $700 

No. 30. 2:27 Class Pacing $700 



The Conditions of these Races the same as the conditions contained in tho ad vurtisomont of the " Los Angeles Fair and Uace Meeting-, 1901, " in the Breeder 
and Sportsman, June 29, 1901. Send all communications to 



E. T, WRIGHT. President. 



F. G. TEED. Secretary. 226 S. Spring St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



[July 27, 1901 



1901 CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR 1901 

Sacramento, Sept. 2d to Sept. 14th, inclusive. 

All Races to be Contested at the State Fair on Days to be Hereafter Designated by the Board of Directors. 

ENTRIES TO CLOSE WITH THE SECRETARY SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1901. 



TROTTING. 

No. 1. 2:40 Class, Trotting:. $800. 

Any Horse entered in this class getting a record of 2:25 or better, prior to 
August 10th, not eligible to start, but his entry may be transferred to the 
2:20 class, and in the event of being entered in the 2:20 class, his entrance 
money will bo refunded. 

No. 2. 2:20 Class, Trottiner, $800. 
No. 3. 2:14 Class, Trottiner, $1000. 



PACING. 

No. 4, 2:25 Class, Pacing*, 



$800. 

Any Horse entered in this class getting a record of 2:20 or better, prior to 
August 10th, not eligible to start, but his entry may be transferred to the 
2:1" class, and in the event of being entered in the 2:17 class, his entrance 
money will be refunded. 

No. 5. 2:17 Class, Pacing;, $800. 
No. 6. 2:13 Class, Paciner, $1000. 



Stals.es 

No. 7. Stake for 3 Year Old Pacers. 

$10 entrance; $20 additional for starters; $250 added. Starters to be 
named through the entry box 5 p. M. day before race. All moneys to be 
divided 60%, 30% and 10%. No deductions from money winners. 



for Colts. 

No. 8. Stake for 4 Year Old Green Pacers. 

$10 entrance; $20 additional for starters; $250 added. Starters to be 
named through the entry box 5 p. m. day before race. All moneys to be 
divided 60%, 30% and 10%. No deductions from money winners. 



No. 9. Stake for 4 Year Old Green Trotters. 

$10 entrance; $20 additional for starters; $250 added. Starters to be named 
through the entry box 5 P. M. day before the race. All moneys to be 

divided 60%, 30% and 10%. 

SPECIAL CONDITIONS. 



Entries to the above nine Races to close with the Secretary, Geo. W. Jackson, Sacramento, 
Saturday, July 29, 1901. when horses are to be named and eligible. 

Five per cent entrance and Ave per cent additional from monev winners, excepting in stakes 
7, 8 and 9, where no deductions are made from money winners, and nominators only held for $10 
entrance fee. All races mile heats, three in five. 



Moneys to be divided 50%, 25%, 15% and 10%, unless otherwise specified in conditions. 
All Races to till satisfactory to the Board of Directors or they may be declared off. 
Distance in all heats 89 yards, but if the field is more than eight, loo yards. A horse not 
winning (or making a dead heat) in three to be ruled out. 
For further conditions, see entry blank. 



The balance of Harness Races to provide a Program of Twenty-four Races, with special races for Roadsters owned by 
members of organized Driving Clubs, open to the State, and a Double Team Race; particulars and conditions to be announced 
August 10, 1901. 

Otherwise than as herein specified, National Trotting Association Rules to govern. 

GEO. W. JACKSON, Secretary. A. B. SPRECKELS. President. 

SPECIAL.: Owinjr to demand for stabling, the Society will only provide stalls for horses entered in races. Special stalls for horses shown for premiums. 

1901 WOODLAND 1901 

Annual Fair and Race Meeting of Agricultural Association District No. 40, 

COMPRISING THE COUNTIES OF YOLO AND SACRAMENTO, 

AUGUST 26th TO 3 1st, INCLUSIVE. The Week Preceding the State Fair. 

GUARANTEED STAKES. TO CLOSE JULY 29, 1901. 

Entrance Five Per Cent. Horses to be Named with Entry. 



TROTTING STAKES. 

No. 1. Three Year Old Trotting $300 No. 6. 

No. 2. 2:12 Class $500 No. 7. 

No. 3. 2:15 " $500 No. 8. 

2:20 " $400 No. 9. 

2:30 " $400 No. 10. 



No. 4. 
No. 5. 



PACING STAKES. 

Free for All Pacing $600 
2:12 Class $500 

2:15 " $500 

2:20 '* $400 
2:30 " $400 



No. 11. Road Race. Trotters and Pacers $300. 



Free for all Road Horses owned and used as such by residents of the District. To be eligible the horse must have been owned by the party making the entry on July 1, 1901, and must not be entered 

in any race other than a local or road race. The Directors reserve the right to reject any entry to this race. 
N. B.— Owners are respectfully linked to enter their horses in two classes and the Program will be arranged so that they can start in both events. 

Owners of Runners, attention! One or more Running Events will be given Each Day, Entries to Close the Night Before the Race. 



Entries in the Stakes for named horses to close with the Secretary Monday, July i9, 1901. 
Eight entries required to fill each Stake, but the Board of Directors reserve the right to hold the 
entries and declare the race filled with a less number and deduct a proportionate amount of the 

Stake will bo divided into four moneys: 50, 35, 15 and 10 per cent. 

5 per cent, of the amount of the Stake will be deducted from each money won. 

The Board of Directors reserve the right to declare two starters a walkover. When only two start 
they may contest for the entrance money paid in, to be divided 66»j' per cent, to the first and 33H per 
cent, to the second horse. A horse distancing the Held shall be entitled to first and fourth moneys 
only, and in no other case will a horse be entitled to more than one money. 

The Board of Directors reserve the right to change the hour and day of any race, except when it 
becomes necessary to ante-date a race, in which instanoe the nominators will receive three days' 
notice by mail to address of entry. 

Address all communications to the Secretary 

A. C. STEVENS, President. 



CONDITIONS. 

The right reserved to declare off or postpone any or all races on account of weather or othe 

sufficient cause. 

Entries not declared out at 5 o'clock p. m. on the day preceding the race shall be required to start 
and declarations must be in writing and made at the office of the Secretary at the track. 

Racing colors must be named by 5 o'clock r. m. on the day preceding the race and must be worn 
on the track in <U1 races. 

The Board of Directors reserve the right to start any heat after the fourth score regardless oMhe 
position of the horses. 

Hopples barred in trotting races, but will be permitted in pacing racos. 
All Stakes are guaranteed for the amount altered, and for the amount offered only. 
Otherwise than as hererin specified the Rules of the National Trotting Association to govern. 



C. F. THOMAS, Secretary, Woodland, Cal, 




S. TOOMEY & CO.'S. 



Record Breaking 

SULKIES, JOG CARTS, PNEUMATIC ROAD WAGONS, and SPEED 
POLES embody all the Latest Improvements. 

BALL BEARINGS ARE DUST AND WATERPROOF. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 

O'BRIEN & SONS, Agts., 

Cor. Folk and Golden Gate Ave., San'Franclsco, Cal. 




July 27, 1901] 



15 



KENNEL ADVERTISEMENTS 



PINE 
HILL 

Red, always on hand. San Anselmo, Gal. 



Cocker Kennels 



POINTER 



FOR SALE. 



A bitch, two years old, well broken and good dis- 
position. Fine looker, lemon and white. 
For particulars address OWNER, 

Care of Breeder and Sportsman. 



AT STUD 



CUBA OF KENWOOD 

(Glenbeigh Jr.— Stella) 

SAM'S BOW 

(Plain Sam— DMly Dee III 

STOCKOALE KENNELS 

K. M. DODGE, Manager, 
Bakerofleld , Kern Co., 

Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken 
Dogs for sale. 



BOOK OK 



Dog Diseases 



AND 

HO X*7" t 

Mailed Free to any address br the nithoi 
FT. Clay Glovkb, D. V. rt.. 1283 u <oadwaT 
New York. 



GORDON SETTER PUPPIES 

FOR SALE. Thoroughbreds by a son of Dick III, 
winner at four bench shows in this city— out of 
Mirza, winner at May show, 1893. 
Address Owner 1950 Grove St., Oakland, Cal. 




ED* DOGS WITH MANGE 

r^O CURl THE M WITH S1ANDARDOII OF TAR 

[HO FOR CIRCULARS TESTIMONIAL.*, .VND FT!U SAMPlf 
.STANDARD DISINFECTANT CO. Cleveland O 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN IS 
Agent for the following publications on 
THE DOG: 

V CM MCI CEPDETQ Tne most exhaustive 
IxLiiHLL OLunLlO) treatise on The Dog 

by Ashmont. lowing the instruc- 
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Price, postpaid, S3.00. volume, even a novice 
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breed and exhibit Dogs as scientifically as a vet- 
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Anyone securing FIVE new yearly subscrip- 
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by Ashmont. 



S^VK^WS DISEASES OF DOGS, 

every owner of a ... 
good Dog. It gives 
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what disease your Price, postpaid, 182.00 
faithful canine 

friend is affected with and how to quickly cure 
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Anyone securing THREE new yearly sub- 
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FETCH AND CARRY, by Waters, 

Price, postpaid, 181.50. 

With the aid of this book anyone with ordinary 
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Anyone securing THREE new yearly sub- 
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MODERN TRAINING 
AND HANDLING.,,, 



by Waters, 



Price, postpaid, I82.00. 

This is universally conceded to be far and awiy 
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PRINCIPLES OF 
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Price, postpaid, 50 cents. 

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and is worth its weight in gold for the field, etc. 
It contains 61 pages and is bound in cloth. 

Anyone securing TWO new yearly subscrip- 
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Palace Hotel 



In placing these two hotels 
under one management and 
joining- them with a covered 
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AMERICAN PLAN EUROPEAN PLAN 



Grand Hotel 



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Mineral Springs, Hot and Cold. 

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THE ROUTE TO 

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And other beautiful towns. 
THE BEST CAMPING GROUNDS ON 
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Ticket Office— Corner New Montgomery and 
Market streets, under Palace Hotel. 
General Office— Mutual Life Building. 

R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass. Agt 



Bursal Elargements, 
Stiff Joints, Arthritis, 
CURED 



4^ Absorbing Jr. 

A pleasant Liniment to use, causing no 
inconvenience. $1.00 per bottle delivered. 

Describe your case fully. Special direc- 
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Address 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 

SPRINGFIELD, • - MASS. 

For sale by Mack&Co., Langley& Michaels Co., 
Redington & Co , J. O'Kane, and J. A. McKerron, 
all of San Francisco. 




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Rates: 
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THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 

Imp. Hackney Stallion 
Green's Rufus 63 < 42 "> 

Will serve a limited number of approved mares season 1901. 

FEE - $75 
Reductions made for two or more mares. 



oreed to the Champion of the World. 
McKINNEY 2:11 1-4 

By Alcyone, dam Rosa Sprague (grandam of FerenoO) 
2:10^) by Gov. Sprague. 

By the percentage of his performers in the 2:15 list McKinney is the 
champion sire of the world. At 13 years of age he has 30 stand- 
ard performers, one-half of which are in the 2:15 list. 



McKINNEY 2:11^ 

sire of 

Coney 2:02 

Jennie Mac 2;09 

Hazel Kinney 2:09M 

Zolock 2:IOi4 

Zombro 2:11 

You Bet 2:12H 

McZeus 2:13 

Dr. Book 2:13^ 

Osito 2:13'/ 2 

Juliet D 2:13H 

McBriar 2:14 

Harvey Mac 2:14J4 

Geo. W. McKinney.... 2:14H 

McNally 2:15 

Monica 2:15 

and 15 more in 2:30 



A Race Horse Himself. 

He started in 28 races, won 25 of them, was twice second 
and once third. 

He is a Sire of Race Horses. 

Every one of his get in the 2:20 list secured the record 
in a race, and all are race winners. 

He is a champion in tJie show ring, champion on the race 
track and a champion in tlie stud. 

In 1900 his get won first, second and fourth money in the Pacific 
Breeders Futurity, first and second money in the Occident Stake 
and first, second and third money in the Stanford Stake. The 
McKinneys are stake winners. Will make the season of 1901 at 



SAN JOSE RACE TRACK. 

Beginning Feb. 1st. until further notice. 

Terms for the Season $100 (with usual return privileges). 

ggTAII Bills Must Be Paid Before the Removal of the Mare. 

Good pasturage for mares at $4 per month. For further particulars, address 

33 Magnolia Avenue, San Jose. Cal. Tel. Green 393. C. A. DURFEE 



VETERINARY. 



Ira Barker Dalziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carriage. Saddle and Road Horses for Sale 

Office and stable: 605 Golden Gate Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. Telephone South 651. 



IDx*. w zrx, TP. Elgau, 

M. R. C. V. S., F. E. V. M. S. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edinburg 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
inspector forNew Zealand and Australian Colonies 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California: Ex-President of 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital. 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco: 
Telephone West 128. 



DR. J. B. BOOMER 

M. D. V., F. M. V. A. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Late Professor of Medicine in McKlllip Veterinary 
College at Chicago and assistant to M. N. 
McKillip of Chicago for seven years. 
Office and Infirmary— 510 Van Ness avenue, San 
Francisco. Cal. Phone: Mint 321. 



CONTRA COSTA COONTY 

AGRICULTURAL ASSN. No. 83. 

CONCORD. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



HOLSTEINS— Winners of every 7 days' butter 
contest at State Fair 1899 1st & 2d for aged cows, 
4-yr., 3-yr. and 2-yr.-olds; 21 Jerseys and Durhams 
competing. 5th year my Holsteins have beaten 
Jerseys for butter. Stock for sale; also pigs. F. 
H. Burko, 626 Market St., S. F. 



V KRIiA BUENA JERSEYS— Tho best A..) 
C. C. registered prize herd is owned by Henrj 
Pierce, San Francisco. Animals for sale. 



JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND DURHAMS, 

Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1876. William Nilos & Co. Los Angeles, 
Cal. 



CALIFORNIA 

Photo Engraving Company 

HIGH CLASS ART 
IN 

Half Tones and Line Engravings. 
Artistic Designing. 
r> I :s Market Street, San Francisco. 



COCOANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOR 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PIGS 

For sale in lots to suit by 

EL DORADO LINSEEO OIL WORKS GO. 

208|Callfornla Street. San Francisco, Cal. 



SPEED PROGRAMME. 
Entries Close September 20th, 

with the Secretary. 

WEDNESDAY — SEPTEMBER 25TH. 

No. 1—2:25 Pace, Free to all, 3 in 5 $ 150 00 

No. 2— Stake race for district yearlings, 
Trot or Pace— Mile dash. Entries close 
August 5th Entrance fee $2.50 on nom- 
ination; $2 50 September 1st and $5.00 
the day of tho race. Three to start to 
get added money of $50.00. 
No. 3— Running, y t mile and repeat 75 00 

THURSDAY— SEPTEMBER 26TH. 

No. 1— Free for all trot, 3 in 5 300 00 

No. 2— Stake race for district two year 
olds, trotters, mile dash. Entries close 
August 5th Entrance fee $2.50 on nom- 
ination; $2 50 September 1st and $5.00 
the day of tho race. Three to start to 
get added money of $50 00. 

No. 3— Running, mile dash 100 00 

No. 4—2:35 Pace, district, 3 in 5 100 00 

FRIDAY — SEPTEMBER 27TH. 

No. 1— For three year old district trotters, 

3 in 5 100 00 

No. 2— Gentlemen's driving race for dis- 
trict trotters. Owners to drive, 3 in 5 
(Horses starting in this race not eligi- 
ble to start in any other race.) 75 00 

No. 3—2:40 Trot, district, 3 in 5 150 00 

No. 4— Running, '4 mile and repeat 50 00 

SATURDAY— SEPTEMBER 28TH. 

No. 1— Free for all, Pace, 3 in 5 300 00 

No. 2— Running, % mile 75 00 

No. 3—2:30 Trot, 3 in 5 150 00 

To constitute ownership in the district, the 
owner of a horse must be either an actual resident 
therein, or his name must appear as a taxpayer on 
real estate therein. 

Entrance; in all purse races 10 por cent, of purse. 
Payable ono-half on nomination and one-half at 
12 o'clock m., day before the race. In all races tho 
purse will bo divided into throe moneys— 60 per 
cent., 30 por cent, and 10 per cent. 

Unless otherwise specified all races milo hoats, 
3 in 5. 

All racing governed by National Association 
Rules. 

In all purse races noted above flvo or moro paid 
up entries required to fill; three or moro horses to 
start. Address, 

A. B. MoKHNZIE, Secretary, 
Martinez, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 
A BAY FILLY. 

A YEARS OLD, TROTTER, BY DICTATUS 
" 2:17; has just been broken and drives nicoly. 
Also, a small Black Mare by Director, 10 years old. 
Both well bred on dam side. For further particu- 
lars address li. & S. office. 



Stallion Service Books 



ONE DOLLAR IN CASH 



At This Office. 



16 



[July 27, 1901 



TELEPHONE-. 

South 640 




San Francisco, Cal.^ ^- 



SMITH GUNS 

At the Cal. Inanimate Target Association, 
May 25-26, 1901. 

71 Shooters, 20 used Smith Guns. 

There were 11 Individual Trophies offered. 
Shooters using SMITH GUNS captured n! 
Coast Record made by Edward Schultz, 112 Straight. 

Edgar Forster, high average, 95%. Ed. Schultz and Otto Foudner, 92%. 
Webb, 911%. E. Feudner, 89J%. Varien, 88%. F. Feudner, 87i%. 
Flickinger; 87%. Shields and McCutchan, 864%, Williamson, 86%. 

They all sh ot L. C . Smith (runs. 

Catalogue on application to 

HUNTER ARMS CO., Fulton, N. Y. 

rilll.. U. BEKEART CO., San Francisco, Coast Representative. 



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Gun Goods 



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VOL. XXIX. No. 5. 
36 GEARY STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1901. 



SUBSCRIPTION 
THREE DOLLARS A YEAR 




CRESCEUS 2:02 3 4 and ELEATA 2:08 3-4. 



2 



[August :t, 1901 



Cleveland Summaries. 



Jul.y 22—2:10 class, trotting, purse *I5U0. 

Sister Alice, b m by Baron Wilkes (Kenney) I 

King Chimes, b g by Chimes (Davis) 2 

Phrase, b m by Onward (Lock wood) 4 

Venus II., ch m by Cupid (Sanders) 3 

Annie Burns, gr m by Bobby Burns (Wi son) d 

Phoebe Childers, b m by Sir Rhoderick (Lapman) il 

Time— 2:12. 2:12. 

Third and fourth money divided between Phrase and Venus II 

2: 13 class, pacing, purse $1500. 
Martha Marshall, b m by Grand Marshall. (McDowell) I I 

Nonamie, b m bv General Boyle (Helm) t ~ 

Twinkle, br m by Mercury (Stiles) i 3 

Frank Marriot, b g by Sonticus (Jones) B 4 

The Minister, blk g by Mauprat (Kivilsi 3 . 

Furioso. br h by Sunrise Patchen (Miller) < 5 

Gus Waibel, br h by Argot Wilkes (Ketcham) ft 10 

Don Rvlev, b g by Caneland Wilkes (Hudson) H 8 

Queen R.'b m by Redondo (Durfee) III B 

You Bet, b m by McKinney (Erwin) 6 b 

Time-2:09M, 2:(W'j. 2:13. 

2:16 class, trotting, purse $2500. 

Metellas, b h by Mambrino King (Shillinglaw) I I 

Annie Wilkes, br m bv Alcone (McDonald) 2 3 

Lady Thlsbe. blk m by Milrol (Kenney) ft 2 

Re-Elected, br h by Re-Election (Macey) 4 4 

Clara Kimball, b m by Harry Noble (Jamison) 3 5 

Al K, b b by Alcantaras (Turner) 6 ds 

Time-2:13'J,2:14?4,2:11 

2:20 class, pacing, purse $1200. 

Audubon Boy, ch g by J. J. Audubon (Hudson) 

Shadow Chimes, b h by Chimes iGeers) 

John H b g by John R. Gentry (Munson) 

Thornwav, b h by Steinway (Walker) 

Lady Perkins, b m i Reedy) 

Xava, ch m by Great Heart (McLane) 

Pop. b g bv Pluck (Croyi 

Mississippi King, b h by Tenn. Wilkes (Wickershami 

Pure Gold, b g by Lord Russell (Burns) 

Sufrett, blk m by Alcantara (French) 

Teddy F , ro g (Snow) 

Time— 2:10. 2:Wi. 

July 23-2; 

Palm Leaf, b m bv Onwardo (McCarthy) 8 3 

Dr. Book, bsr bv McKinnev . . (Durfee and Kenney) 1 
Janice, b m 
CJraeie Onw 
Gunsaulus 
Axlello, b 

Dot Miller, b m by Epoch (Walker) 7 5 7 4 

Senator K , blk m by Laputa (Nuckols) 6 7 5 8 

Our Lucky, b h bv Gibraltar (Donnelly) 5 B or 



l 



6 2 

3 8 

8 4 

9 5 

4 7 

5 A 

6 9 
III lis 
ds 



14 class trotting, purse $1500. 

b m bv Onwardo (McCarthy) 

g bv McKinnev.. (Durfee and Kenney) 

by William Harrold (Sanders) 

ard.ch ra by Onward .(Macey) 

b h bv Sphinx (Hoffman) 

bv Axtell (Marsh) 

h in bv Epoch (Walker) 

blk m by Laputa (Nuckols) 

b h by Gibraltar (Donnelly) 



Time— 2:10, 2:12(5, 2:10^, 2:IHi, 2:13!',. 2:134. 

2:07 class, pacing, purse $1500 
Riley B., blk s by Happy Riley... (Erwin and Nuckols) 2 111 

Eyelet, gr m bv ( iambetla Wilkes (Kenney) 6 4 12 

Charley Havt, b h by Allerton (Snow) I ft fids 

Dariel. b m by Alcandre (McDonald) 3 2 2 

Paul Revere, ro g by Brandon (Atkinson) 5 3 3 

Egozen. b h bv Egotist (Critchfield ] 7 fi 5 

Edith W . b m by Bon Lomond Jr (Turner) i 1 7 

Time— 2:06'i, 2:08%, 2:114, 2:09!/,. 
2:15 class, pacing, purse $2500. 

Dan Patch, br s by Joe Patchen (McHeury) 1 1 1 

Armorel, gr m by Don Pizarro (McDonald) 2 2 2 

H. J. P., br m bv Conclave (Jamison) 3 3 3 

Shecan. b g by Durfee (Reynolds) 1 4 4 

Baroletta. I) m by Grand Baron (Miller) 5 5 6 

Ferrum. b g bv Guy Princeton (GarhVld) s 6 5 

Paulding Boy. b h by Roy Wilkes (Vogcl) 8 ds 

Lady All Right, ch m by Senator Rose (Roth) 7 ds 

Time— 2:104, 2:114, 2:114. 
2:27 class, trotting, purse $1200. 

The King, b g by Clay King (Marsh i I 1 

Iva Dee. h in by Onward (Thomas) 2 2 

Mariuue. ch s by Expedition (Kenney i 3 3 

Pat Swazey. blk m by Neptune (McDonald) 4 6 

Toledo Bcr, ch g bv Robert McGregor (Lockwood) 6 I 

Springdale, br s by King Maker (D. Wilson) 5 7 

-N'utbearer. br g bv Nutbreaker (Foote) 8 5 

Mela Arthur, br m by King Arthur (Ruthford) 7 8 

John Hooper, ch g by L. H (Bristol) ds 

Time— 2:13M. 2:13&. 
July 24 —2:23 class, trotting, purse $2500. 

Eleata, blk mare by Dexter Prince (Marsh) I 1 1 

Country Jay, ch g by Jayhawker (Macey) 2 2 3 

Neva Simmous, b m by Simmons (Price) 3 3 2 

Alberta D , ch g by Viking Jr (Shillinglaw) 4 4 7 

L. B., ch g by Spartacus (McLaughlin) 8 8 4 

A. J. D., by Anderson Wilkes (Huston) ft 5 6 

Poindexter. br h by Abbottsford (Gatcomb) 6 6 ft 

Pettigrew, br h by Kingward (McHenry) 7 7 8 

Time-2:ll»i, 2:09>4, 2:10. 
2:17 class, pacing, purse $1500. 

Richard A , b g by Wilkesonian (Nuckols) 1 I 

C. F. W.. blk h by Roscoe (Higbee) 2 5 

Samaritana, blk m by Mercury (Miller) 8 2 

JMn, blk m by Joe Patchen (Haws) 6 3 

.lackmout. b g by Kitemont (Green) 3 6 

Captain Potter, grg (Erwin) 4 4 

Guinette b h by Gladstone (McEwen) ft 8 

Orin B . b g by Greystone (Hudson) 7 7 

Baron D , br h by Baron Wilkes (Foote) ds 

Time— 2: lux, 2:104. 
2:09 class, pacing, purse $2500. 

George, b g by Scarlet Wilkes (McKinney) 8 111 

Argetta, ch m by Greystone (Berry) 13 5 5 

Sphinx S . ch g by Sphinx (Geers) 4 2 

Goshen Jim, by Moses S (Walker) 6 7 

Tom Nolan, by General Hancock (Nuckols) 9 9 

Carmine, b g by Symboleer (Golden) 5 8 

Daisy .1 . b m by Mont joy (Garfield) 3 5 

White Hose, ch m by White Foot (Munson) 10 4 

Sidney Pointer, b h by Star Pointer (Moffett) 7 6 

Rey Rirect, blk s by Direct (Cecil) 2 ds 

Time— 2:094, 2:08X. 2:I0£, 2:09&. 
2:21 class, trotting, purse $1200. 

Tom P., br g by Combat Jr (Atkinson) 1 1 

Darwin, gr g by Connoisseur (Lockwood) 4 2 

Vic Sheller, br g by Hambletonian Wilkes I Van Bokkelen) 2 5 

Sphinx Lassie, b m by Sphinx (Turner) 3 4 

Truffles, gr m by Pilot Medium (W. McDonald) 5 3 

Minke, ch m by Mincement (Ryan) 6 8 

Jenette, gr m by Frank Burgess (McDonald) ds 

Time— 2:124, 2:144*. 
2:23 class, pacing, purse $250(1. 

Star Pugh, ch h by Tom Pugh (Lockwood) 1 8 2 7 1 1 

Plenty, b g by Superior ( Walker) 4 3 1 18 2 

Helen D , b m by Crafty (Maloncy) 3 15 4 6 3 

Harry Logan, ch g by Harry Gear (Boucher) 7 2 3 2 4 

Dainty Queen, blk. m (Munson) 6 7 6 6 2 

Bunce.Jr. b g by Bunce (Hildrethi 5 6 7 3 5 

Challie Downing, ch m by Anderson Wilkes 

. (Huston) 10 5 4 5 dr 

Stanton Wilkes, ch h by Nutwood Wilkes 

(Donnelly) 8 4 dr 

Colonel Baldwin, b g by Baron Star. . .i GarhVld ) 9 10 dr 

Thornwav. b h by Steinway (McHenry) 2 9 dr 

Braden, b h by Brown Hal (Miller) 11 ds 

Time— 2:11, 2:09, 2:104- 2:13*. 212'/,, 2:14^. 
2:12 class, trotting, purse $2500.2 

Onward Silver, ch h by Onward (Geers) 3 ft I 1 1 

Cornelia Belle, b m by Onward (Kirby) 1 I 2 .1 2 

Dolly Dillon, b m by Sidney Dillen 

(McHenry-Sanders) 4 3 3 2 5 



2 2 

3 6 

6 3 

4 4 

7 ds 
ds 
dr 



(Fisher) 

(Turner I 

. (Wickersham) 

(Geers) 

(Curtis) 

(Jamison) 

(Foote) 



Phoebe Onward, b m by Shadeland Onward (Marsh) 5 4 4 
Maggie Anderson, b m by Anderson Wilkes. .(Noble) 6 6 6 

Alice Barnes, b m by Election (Lockwood) 2 2 5 

Belle Onward, b m by Onward (Jamison) ds 

Time-2:ll, 2:12, 2:104, 2:1254. 2:12. 

2:07 class, trotting, purse $2500. 

Charley Herr, br h bv Alfred G (Kelly) 2 

The Monk, br g by Chimes \Noblei 1 

Kingmond, b g by King Darling (Marsh) 3 

Time— 2:13, 2:09, 2:10*£. 

2:27 class, pacing, purse $1200. 

Billy H.. b h by Alexander Dumas 

John R. Potts, b g by Ernest B 

Carnot, blk h by Lochinvar 

Shadow Chimes, b s by Chimes 

Ethel Brown, blk m by Jim Wilkes 

James Alexander, b g by Baron Posey 

Reckless, b g by Hyatt 

Time— 2:11K, 2:104- 

July 26—2:18 class, trotting, purse $1500. 

Charley Mac, blk g by McKinney (Durfee) 

All Right, lis by Euright (Atkinson) 

Susie J., rn m by Jay Hawker (McKee) 

Alice Carr. blk m byGambetla Wilkes. (Hudson) 

Eula Mac. blk m by McKinney (Sanders) 

Rand, ch g by Bartholomew Wilkes (Nuckols) 

Stockton, b h by Red Wing (Delinger) 

Etlle G , b m by Alfred G (Walker) 

Oneonta. ch m by Blue Vein (Olney) 

Time-2:15. 2:15, 2:13, 2:14. 2:144, 2:164- 

Free for all pace, purse $2500 

Anaconda, b g by Knight, by Algona (Trout) 

Connor, big g by C. F. Clay (McDonald) 

Coney, blk g by McKinney 1 (McDowell) 

Indiana, b g by King of Bi llaire (McCarthy) 

Time-2:06, 2:08',. 

2:11 class, pacing, purse $1500. 



5 3 
4 4 
dr 



I I 

3 3 



1 I 

4 2 

2 5 

3 3 

5 4 
ds 
ds 



1 




4 


4 


1 1 


5 


6 




I 


2 2 


8 


1 


2 


8 


6 3 


S 


2 


6 


3 


3 


3 


5 


3 




9 


9 


3 


8 


9 


4 


4 


4 




- 5 


5 


7 


8 


5 


8 


8 


6 





9 


6 





1 I 

2 3 
4 2 

3 4 



Harold H., b g by Roadmaster, by Brown Dick 


.(Proctor) 


1 








. i Turner; 


4 


2 


I 


Pussy Willow, b m by Cibola 


(Munson) 


5 


4 


2 




(Snow) 


2 


5 


5 






3 


3 


1 


i Hackley) 


6 


fidr 



Time-2:08, 2:10, 2:10*. 
2:25 class, trotting, purse $1200. 

Coxey, b g by Judge Cox (McHenry I 

Algoneta, b m by Eros (Sanders) 

Nutbearer, br g by Nutbreaker (Foote) 

Blue Flower, bm by Blue Bird (Pinnock) 

Betsy Ross, b m by Wilkes Boy (Nelhaway) 

Ted, blk g by Norval (Aguew) 

Saint Ilario, b g by Indian Hill (Turner) 

Time-2:14, 2:164, 2:13*. 



1 1 

2 2 

3 3 

4 4 

5 5 
fids 
7ds 



Two in Three. 



Tho plan of having a few races on the two in throe 
system is sui-eossfully tried at Detroit, and almost to a 
man the spectators and horsemen that have expressed 
an opinion on the subject are in favor it. The only 
tiresome races during the meeting werje the two long- 
drawn-out ones won by Spear and had these been two 
in three, much more interest would have been taken 
in them by every one, with the possible exception of a 
few bettors. Only those who have a selfish interest in 
racing object to this plan, and wherever it is tried the 
races are won by the best horses. The racing public, 
or that part of tho public that attends trotting races 
for pleasure, and that pays to see the sport is desirous 
of a change from the present system. In races of the 
two in three plan there is always more life and more 
snap than whoro several horsos win heats, and as a 
consequence drivers begin to lay up. The racing pub- 
lic that must be looked to as a support for racing if it 
shall thrive is in favor of the two in three plan, and 
within the next three vears all but the fixed events 
will be on that plan. Tho change will come even 
though the bookmakers and drivers do not wish it. 
The present plan is responsible directly or indirectly 
for nearly all tho evils and for all the wrecks that are 
seen among trotting ranks at the latter end of the 
season. 

Given fewer heats in one day the horses will go 
faster and last longer. — Ky. Stuck Farm. 

Queer Pool Room in Chicago. 

Six detectives, in charge of Clifton Wooldridge, re- 
cently raided the meat market at 191 Madison street, 
Chicago, where William Hoardman, proprietor of the 
place, was conducting an alleged poolroom. When 
the policemen entered there was no evidence of a pool- 
room. Instead of placards announcing the entries in 
the different races quarters of beef and yellow covered 
hams adorned the walls. 

The officers, however, made a thorough search of 
the premises. A largo dummy ham was found tilled 
with records of bets accepted on the result of racing 
at Washington Park. Tho results of the wafers 
ranged from $2 to $20, and all were deposited in 
envelopes. 

In a corner of tho refrigerator was a ticker, from 
which was Mowing tho tape with till the sporting events. 

Tho only occupants of the place at tho time wore 
William Board man and three men, each wearing the 
garb of a butcher. All were arrested and taken to 
the central station in a patrol wagon. The dummy 
ham, with the registered bets and the ticker, was con- 
fiscated, and will bo used as evidence in Justice Prindi- 
ville's court at the Harrison street station. 

Caustic Balsam Cures Poll Evil. 



Bi.AM), W. Va , Jan. 19, 19(10. 
Some time back I wrote you about a horse of mine having a 
swollen head and appearance of poll evil. His head is well or 
aixiul well now, by using Gombault's Caustic Balsam. 

R A. Smith. 



California Blood in Virginia. 

Richmond, Va., July 2.'1, 1001. 

The performance of Coney at the Dotroit Crand Cir- 
cuit meeting when the unsexed son of McKinney and 
G race Kaiser earned a new pacing record of 2:02 was 
well received here, as his full brother, the brown stal- 
lion McZeus 2:13, is owned in this city by W. K. 
Mathows, the musician, who purchased tho horse from 
John W. Gardiner, his breeder, at Los Angeles, and 
reached here with him during the early part of 1896, 
certainly in full time for the commencement of the 
spring season, but probably on account of the depres- 
sion in the horse market then little patronage was ac- 
corded the handsome brown stallion or, indeed, has he 
ever had a baker's dozen mares all told during any 
year since until the present one when some well bred 
matrons have been bred to him. Of the get of Mc- 
Zeus owned hero, which are very few, two of the best 
that I recall are owned by Mathews himself. One of 
them is a brown gelding three years old out of Mar- 
garet Walker, by Garabetta, recond dam the Busted 
Mare, grand dam of Io, 2:111, while tho other is a bay 
colt also three years old and out of the big roan mare 
Miss Bird, by Jay Bird, second dam by Young Jim. 

Quite a good sire of speed is the bay stallion Great 
Stakes 2:20, by Billy Thornhill, owned until recently 
by Capt. John L. Roper, of Norfolk, Va. Great Stakes 
is now tho property of W. F. Steele, of New York, 
who formerly resided at Chicago and owned and cam- 
paigned the good Dexter Prince gelding James L. 
2:09}. Capt. Roper has purchased from the Burlin- 
game farm, Washingtonville, N. Y., the grand look- 
ing broodmare Helice, by Norval, dam by Onward, 
and she has at her side an unusually attractive look- 
ing bay colt by Burlingame, the son of Guy Wilkes. 

Of the harness stallions kept for service in Virginia, 
ono who represents the highest type of the trotter is 
the bay horse Kelly 2:27, the Palo Alto bred son of 
Electioneer and Esther, dam of Expressive .'1, 2:12}, by 
thoroughbred Express. Kelly was very fast, but ever 
singularly unfortunate. He has sired McChesney 
2:19), about the only one of his got to be regularly 
trained and raced. This son of Electioneer was for- 
merly the joint property of John E. Madden and 
James Cox and they refused some tempting offers for 
the horse, more than one reaching live figures. Later 
he passod to Mr. Cox and now heads Belgravia Farm, 
tho beautiful estate of the latter near Mt. Jackson. 

Mr. Cox also owns another Palo Alto bred trotter in 
Libbie Whips, a mare of massive build like Azote 2:04 j, 
and others of the get of her sire Whips. Libbie Whips 
dam wasAmrah, dam of Fleetwood 2:29}, by Nutwood 
Another of the Belgravia farm mares is Erona 2:19}, 
dam of Allercyone 2:17}, and two others by Alcyone. 
Her foal of 1001 is tho chestnut filly Helen Wilraer by 
Kelly, and there is no grander looking suckling in the 
East. Helen Wilmer is bred the reverse of what I 
hear spoken as one of tho best at Palo Alto, viz., a 
yearling by McKinney, son of Alcyone, out of Ex- 
pressive, the full sister to Kelly. Erena and Libby 
Whips wore both bivd this season to .Supremacy 2:20, 
the son of Bell Boy and Susan, full sister to Ailen 
Lowe 2:12, by Alcantara, and from the union fillies are 
hoped for that mav in time be mated with Kelly. 

In a recent issue of the Breeder and Sportsman 
I noticed that McKinnev had served 104 mares this 
season, which you thought was a greater numbor than 
had been mated with any other trotting sire during 

1901, but Supremacy, the son of Bell Boy referred to 
above, had beon bred to 108 up to July bth, while sixty 
more were booked for the summer and fall. Suprem- 
acy is owned by Dr. D. D. Carter, of Woodstock, Va., 
but controlled, I believe, by George W. Linaweaver, of 
the same place. However, it may be added that 
Supremacy's foo is only ten dollars the season, while 
your great California sire readily commands ten times 
that sum. 

In glancing over your advertising columns I notice 
the announcement that Castleton farm, Lexington, 
Ky., is for sale. This grand estato is one of the finest 
in all tho famous Blue Grass region. It was there that 
B. W. Ford, now of this city, bred that brilliant cam- 
paigner Trevillian 2:08} and other crack light harness 
performers. Since then tha Keenes have made the 
place famous as a nursery of thoroughbreds with Com- 
mando, Cap and Bells and others as shining lights. 
Maj. Daingerfield, to whom was presented and shipped 
from California a generation sinco by Mr. Keene the 
crack trotter stallion of those days, Sam Purdy 2:2<M, 
presides over Castleton and guided by his hand its 
fame has widened. W. J. Carter. 

The newspapers sometimes get hold of some pretty 
old stuff which they print as news. For instance an 
item has been going the rounds of the eastern horse 
papers during tho past few weeks stating that Billy 
And rows 2:00.1 has been gelded. The report is trm- 
enough but not news by any means as the Year Honk 
of 1890 stated tho fact and for threo years he has 
figured in tho summaries as a bay gelding. 



August 3, 1901] 



CALIFORNIA CIRCUIT OPENS. 



Excellent Racing and Good Attendance at the 
Breeders Meeting. 



Sacramento, July 30, 1901. 
Never has that sterling organization, the Pacific 
Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association, had a 
more auspicious opening for its annual meeting than 
to-day, when the gate receipts were larger than on any 
first day for years, and the racing of such high class 
that words of approval and commendation were heard 
on every hand, although the two main events were 
won in straight heats by horses that seemed to outclass 
their fields. There were probably fifteen hundred peo- 
ple on the well kept grounds of the State Agricultural 
Society when the bell called the horses for the first 
race, and Secretary Kelley had everything in readi- 
ness. Director T. J. Crowley had the starter's (lag for 
the first event, as Director A. L. Cohen, who is the 
official starter of the organization, was disqualified by 
reason of his ownership of Advertisor, one of the com- 
peting horses. The day was cloudy, but hot and sul- 
try. The track was in good condition, but not what 
might be called a fast track, as it can be made a couple 
of seconds faster than it was to-day. 

Ten good looking horses were lined up at tho hun- 
dred yards pole by assistant starter Jack Dinue for the 
first event, which was the 2:25 pace for a stake of $1000. 
In the draw for position Enoch got the pole, with 
Direct C, Toppy, Sir Albert S., Alsandy, Banker's 
Daughter, Nellie I., Advertisor, Our Boy's Sister and 
Harry J. in the order as named. The last three had 
to go in the second tier, as but seven horses can score 
abreast with safety. Just prior to the race, pools sold 
as follows: Sir Albert S. $10, Toppy $8, field $10, and 
the books offered the following odds: Toppy 4 to 5, 
Sir Albert S. 6 to 5, Enoch 4 to 1, Alsandy, Banker's 
Daughter and Direct C. (i to 1 each, Advertisor, Our 
Boy's Sister, Harry J. and Nellie I. 10 to 1 each. The 
result showed that while the two favorites had been 
sized up pretty well by the bookmakers and the pub. 
lie, a woful ignorance existed in regard to the capabil- 
ities of the field horses. After a few scores the word 
was given to a good start and Direct C, a little son of 
the ex-champion Direct, shot out in the lead with a 
rush that gave promise of fast time. He was at 
the quarter in -'SI 1 , seconds, closely followed by 
Toppy, with Sir Albert S. three or four lengths be- 
hind going easily and the others strung out and 
seemingly in difficulties. Halfiway between the quar. 
ter and the half Direct C. left his feet and went to a 
tangled break, from which he did not recover until 
hopelessly out of the race. Toppy, whose speed had 
kept Direct C. tiptoeing, assumed the lead, but at the 
turn Jack Groom came alongside with Sir Albert S. 
and the two horses were lapped until they turned into 
the stretch. Here the son of Diablo assumed com- 
mand in a manner that showed his class and with a 
sweeping, frictionless stride led to the wire by a length 
in 2 : 1 1 -i , with every appearance of a horse that could 
have come the mile three seconds faster had it been 
necessary. Toppy was second, Our Boy's Sister thiid 
Advertisor fourth, Harry J. fifth, Alsandy sixth. 
Enoch seventh, Nellie I eighth and Banker's Daughter 
and Direct C. behind the flag. It was a great heat for 
a lot of green horses their first time out this year and 
the owner and breeder of the winner, Mr. William G. 
Layng, former editor of the Breeder and Sports- 
man, now proprietor of tho Occidental Horse Ex- 
change in San Francisco, came in for many congratu- 
lations which were further extended after the horse 
had won the next two heats as he pleased in 2:12| and 
2:12. Jack Groom, the trainer and driver of Sir Albert 
S. also received many words of praise for the masterly 
way in which he handled the horse in the race, while 
William Murray, owner of Diablo 2:00] , was showered 
with congratulations over the fact of this son of his 
unbeaten stallion being one of the greatest green 
horses ever seen in California. It is said that Sir 
Albert S. worked a mile in 2:08i the week before tho 
race, and a dozen watches caught him a quarter in 
29J seconds in his warming up exercise just prior to 
the race to-day. 

The second and third heats require but little des- 
cription. Sir Albert S. completely outclassed his field. 
His driver seemed able to place him anywhere and no 
campaigner that has followed the circuit for years has 
any better head than this son of Diablo. Ho played 
with the field in the second heat finishing the mile in 
2:12}. Farmer Bunch boat tho others with Our Boy's 
Sister in this heat and again finished second in the 
third heat, far in advance of tho field. She paced one 
neat as good as 2:13 and ought to reach the 2:10 list 
this year. Toppy took third money and also showed 
high class for a green colt. Advertisor was fourth and 
had to fight to get there, the Gossiper mare Nellie I 
giving him a battle. With Sir Albert S. out of the 
race Our Boy's Sister would iprobably have been the 



winner and all the heats would have been in 2:14 or 
better. The summary of tho race is as follows: 

Pacing, 2:25 class. Stake $1000. 

Sir Albert S , b g by Diablo-Eftle Logan by Durfee 

_ V (J- Groom) 1 1 1 

Our Boys Sister, ch m by Bay wood (Bunch) 3 8 2 

{°PPy. oh g by Delphi (Whitehead) i 3 3 

Advertisor, br h by Advertiser (Latterly) 4 6 4 

Nellie I, ch m by Gossiper (Donathan) 8 4 5 

Enoch b g by Sidmoor (Simpson) 7 5 6 

Al Sandy, b g by Way laud W (Cabney) « 7 ds 

Harry J., b g by Reavis Steinway (Wheeler) 5 ds 

Banker s Daughter, b m by Arthur Wilkes. . . .-(W. Brown) ds 

Direct C, br h by Direct (Trefry) ds 

Time— 0:3li4. i;()5. 1:87M. 2:11 H 

0:XtH, IMii, 1:893d i'-Wi- 
0:33*, 1:05, 1:88, 2:12. 

The 2:40 trot also went to a favorite. It had a field 
of nine starters, not a poor looker among them and 
containing at least four that should get into the 2:15 
class before the year is ended. In the auctions before 
the first heat a number of pools were sold with What 
Is It bringing $10, Nora McKinney $5 and the field $3. 
In the books the odds were Floradora 4 to 1, Pearl K. 
8, Prince 10, Nora McKinney 3 to 2, What Is It 1 to 2, 
Peter Jackson 6, Black Bart 5, Almonada 10, Cornelius 
D. 6. 

There were but two or three scores before the word 
was given, and this was the rule all through the race 
while the starting, as in tho pace, was excellent. 
Trainer Al McDonald, who drove Mr. A. G. Gurnott's 
gray gelding What Is It (by Direct, out of the dam of 
Who Is It 2:10]), seemed to have the same confidence 
in the speed of his horse that Mr. Groom displayed with 
Sir Albert S. and was content to get away in an/ 
position as long as he could see clear sailing. When 
the word was given the first timo, Cornelius D., Nora 
McKinney and Peter Jackson went to the front and it 
looked as though the namesake of the dusky pugilist 
would be able to finish very close to the winner or do 
tho trick himself, but he must have stepped on the 
same .watermelon seed that Direct C. slipped on in the 
first heat of the pace, as he broke at the same place 
and saw the red banner waving in the sky as he came 
toward the wire. Around the turn What Is It came 
up with Nora McKinney and Cornelius D. and they 
trotted around the turn abreast in one of the prettiest 
races imaginable. The gray was on the outside and 
the two led him - down the stretch until the draw gate 
was reached, and here he shot to the front with a 
great burst of speed beating Nora McKinney out by 
two lengths, Cornelius D. dropping back to fourth 
place, Ed Lafferty trotting into third place easily with 
the handsome chestnut mare Floradora, Cornelius D. 
was fourth, Black Bart fifth, Prince L. sixth, Almon- 
ada seventh, Pearl K. eighth and Peter Jackson dis- 
tanced. The heat was in 2:16], fast for the first heat 
of the year on this track. 

In the second heat What Is It and Nora McKinney 
raced out in front all the way, Floradora following 
them in a manner which said "I may not be able to 
get up there in front, but I can beat those behind me." 
Pearl K. caught the flag in her face this time Tho 
time was the same as the first hoat. What Is It 
pulled up lame. 

The third heat was won by What Is It easily in 2:184, 
although his lameness was very perceptible when scor- 
ing. Nora McKinney trotted a splendid race and is 
evidently a very high class mare. Two weeks ago she 
was so ill at San Jose that it was considered very 
doubtful if she would be able te start at this meeting. 
She was not in shape to race to-day, but her perfect 
gait and gameness attracted the attention and admira- 
tion of every horseman who saw her trot. 

What Is It, the winner, is tho third of the foals of 
Lassie Jean to enter the standard list, and ho has a 
way of going that leads one to believe him capable of 
taking a mark around 2:12. He looks something like 
his famous half brother Who Is It 2:10], but is a 
smaller and stouter built horso. He is owned and was 
bred at Sulphur Spring Stock Farm, the property of 
Mr. A. G. Gurnett, vice-president of the Breeders As- 
sociation, and has been trained and driven by the 
farm's trainer Al McDonald, who deserves much credit 
for the manner in which he brought this horso to the 
post. What Is It is a horso of perfect manners, can be 
driven by a child and and is a square line trotter. The 
mare Floradora will trot to a mark of 2:15 this year if 
she does not have to moot Nora McKinney and What 
Is It or some other green one that is as fast as thoy 
are in her races. She is a handsome individual and 
Ed Laft'erty has her in good shape. She has had but 
a limited amount of training and a milo in 2:15 will 
probably be her limit this season, but she should be 
ablo to boat it next yoar several seconds. Floradora 
was bred by Mr. A. L. Cohen and is now owned by Mr. 
Albert Joseph of San Francisco. Cornelius D., the 
winnor of fourth money, will got a murk bolow 2.20 a 
fow seconds before long. He is a son of McKinney. 

What Is It, gr g by Direct-Lassie Jean by Brigadier 

(McDonald) 1 1 1 

Nora McKinney, b m by McKinney (Bunch) 2 2 2 

Floradora, ch m by Sable Steinway (Latterly) 3 3 3 

Cornelius D., b g by McKinney (Maben) 4 4 5 

Prince L., b g by Escort (W.Brown) 8 6 4 

Almonada, br s by Eros (Dolaney) 7 7 6 

Black Bart, blk h by Robin (Quinn) 5 fids 

Pearl K., br m by Wayland W (Cabney) K ds 

Peter Jackson, br g by Designer (Dopoister) ds 

Time -0:35%, 1:09, 1:43, 2:161* 

0:34, 1:08k, 1:41'/,, 2:16^ 

0:35, 1:08^, l:42'/ 2 , 2:18'/ 2 



a 

The third race of the day was the Palace Hotel 
Stakes for members of the Golden Gate Park Driving 
Club. There were but three starters, with Eden Vale 
tho favorite. Bollivar was distanced the first heat 
which was won by Durfee Mac driven by his owner 
Albert Joseph. Eden Vale had the most speed, but 
Mr. Jacobs did not seem able to keep him on his feet 
and lost in the slow time of 2:28]. The second hoat 
was a little faster, 2:252, with Eden Vale again losin- 
by breaking and acting badly. Mr. Jacobs secured 
permission for Mr. Patrick to drive his horse and Eden 
Vale won the next heat in 2:20 with Durfee Mac stop- 
ping badly. The next two heats and the race went to 
Eden Vale in 2:25 and 2:26. 

pacing" 6 H ° tel St8ke f0r GoWen Gate Drivin K Club members- 

0iiu,lr (Patrick) ds 

Time-2:28!4, 8:85*, 2:20, 2:25 , 2:2(i. 

SECOND DAY. 

July 31.— The day opened hot. As hot weather is 
prevailing over East where the Grand Circuit races 
are being held, the Weather Bureau at Sacramento 
probably thought a high temperature was the proper 
thing for a high class meeting in California and fur- 
nished it accordingly. The thermometer registered 
over 100 in the shade at noon, but the dry hoat of the 
Sacramento valley enables one to enjoy himself and 
feel comfortable at a temperature that would be killing 
on the Atlantic Coast. The heat did not keep the 
people away nor make the horses go any slower. 

The main event of the day was the 2:13 pace in which 
another son of Diablo showed himself a game race 
horse as well as a fast one. This was El Diablo, a horse 
that appeared on the California circuit in 1899 and 
started in two races. In his first essay that year he 
started in the 2:30 class pace at Santa Rosa which was 
won by Wild Nutling after six heats. El Diablo's 
place in the summary was last, his positions in the 
heats being 9-10-ds. There were ten starters. This 
was not a very creditable showing. His next and last 
start that year was at Oakland where in a field of 12 
horses he again hud last place in the summary. He 
was second the first heat which was in 2:15 and won by 
John A. El Diablo won the second heat in 2:16] and 
then had to be drawn and it was announced that he 
had broken down. Roblet won the race. El Diablo 
was then retired until this year when J. W. Thompson 
of Riverside purchased him and put him in charge of 
C. W. Farrar who has trained him and drove him to 
victory to-day. El Diablo met a field of five good 
horses this afternoon, and after Margaretta had taken 
the first heat in 2:12], reducing her former record of 
2:15, El Diablo won the next three in 2:12], 2:154 and 
2:1". In the first heat Margaret was never headed, 
but Doc Wilkes fought every inch of the way and was 
beaten but a half length, El Diablo at his wheel. 

The speed shown by El Diablo in the stretch caused 
him to be made a favorite for the next heut und he 
sold for $10, John A. for $4 and the field $7. The 
Direct mare led again to the half, Doc Wilkes lapped 
on her with El Diablo a length back. Going onto the 
far turn Farrar pulled his horse to the outside, and 
went round the leaders easily and beat Doc Wilkes 
home in 2:12], the same timo as the first heat. Mar- 
garetta dropped back to last place in this hoat and 
could not get up in the lead afterwards. El Diablo won 
tho next two heats as he pleased, the contest in them 
being between John A. and Doc Wilkes for third 
money, which the former won. El Diablo is a royally 
brod fellow, his dam being Elwood 2:17:}, dam of three 
in the list, by A. W. Richmond, second dam Crichton's 
First (dam of Arrow 2:13]) by Crichton, a son of imp. 
Gloncoe. 

The Speedway Stakes for mombors o r tho Golden 
Gate Park Driving Club was won by Mr. Goo. Swett's 
Stove S. by Steve Whipplo in straight hoats. 

A most interesting race was the 2:23 trot, half-mile 
hoats, best throe in five. It had five startors, and tho 
favorite, Solo by McKinney, was the winner. This 
mare was purchased last spring by Farmer Bunch for 
Ho Yow, the Chinese Consul in this city, and this was 
tho first race in which his gorgeous colors had been 
seen. Ho Yow sat in tho stand and was un interested 
spectator throughout the raco. The colors worn by 
Bunch were a handsome blue jucket on the buck of which 
wus embroidered a brilliant drugon. Tho cup wus red 
and carried tho mandarin button and tassel. The 
second heat of this race was trotted in 1:06] and all 
were battles from start to finish. 

Solo is a royally-bred mare, her siro being McKinnoy 
2:11] and her dam was sired by tho famous Stamboul 
2:07 J. Her record of 2:23 was made over tho Concord 
truck in Contra Costa county two years ago. 

Before the regular races of tho day two throe year 
old trotters belonging to the Meek Farm at Flay wards 
were started for a record and got into tho list without 
much trouble, driven by Harney Simpson. Thoy could 
have gono much fastor but it was simply desired to 
give them standard records as a precaution. One, tho 



8 



[August 3, 1901 



THE WEEKLY 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 



furf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 



— OFFICE — 



36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



P. O. BOX 2300. 



I . rni- Kiie Year S3, Six Moiithg SI. 75, Three Months SI 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
addressed to F. VV. Keli.ky, 36 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 

U. G. TI'KKI & CO., Agents. Subscription and advertising. 

Salisbury Building, Melbourne, Australia 



San Francisco, Saturday, August 3, iqoi. 



Dates Claimed. 



IH'TTF ami ANACONDA June ;>9-«l days 

KVERETT, Wash Sept. 9-15 

BOISE. Idaho (State Fair) -> Sept. 16-21 

CARSON CITY, Nev Sept. 22-28 

SALEM, Oregon (State Fair) Sept. 23-28 

NEW WESTMINSTER tPmvincial Fair) Oct. 1-5 

LA GRANDE, Oregon Oct. 1-5 

THE DALLES, Oregon (District Fair) Oct. 1-5 

VANCOUVER, B. C Oct. 1-5 

LEWISTON. Idaho (Inter-State Fair) Oct. 7-12 

VICTORIA, B. C Oct. 7-12 

RAKER CITY, Oregon October 6-12 

SPOKANE, Wash Sept. 1(1-21 



THE OKAND CIRCUIT. 

COLUMBUS July 29 to Aug. 3 

oUEFALO Aug. 5-10 

I. ENS FALLS Aug. 12-17 

UF.ADVILLE Aug. 19-24 

H ARTFORD Sept. 2-6 

SYRACUSE Sept. 9-13 

PROVIDENCE Sept. 96-30 

TKRRE HAUTE Sept. 31 to Oct. 5 

CALIFORNIA. 

P. C. T H B. A., SACRAMENTO July 3(1 to Aug. 3 

SANTA ROSA August 12 to 17 

WOODLAND, District No. 40 August 26-31 

1 ' V LIFORNIA STATE FAIR, Sacramento Sept. 2-14 

FERNDA I.E. Humboldt Sept. 10-14 

GOLDEN OATE RACK M FETING, Oakland. . .Sept. 16 to 24 incl 

STOCKTON Sept. 16 to 21 

CONCORD. 'District No. 23) Sept. 23 to 28 

LOS ANGELES Sept. 28 to Oct. 12 incl 



SANTA ROSA'S PURSES for harness horses will 
close to-day. The Santa Rosa track is in better 
condition than ever, every effort is being made to hold 
a race meeting- that will be a credit to Sonoma county 
and there is every prospect of a big- attendance. 
Owners of trotters and pacers should enter liberally 
at Santa Rosa, as the purses offered are generous and 
the eond itions liberal. The Santa Rosa Racing Associa- 
tion is a new organization, with the best citizens of that 
thriving city among its members. They will keep 
every promise made, and should receive a big entry 


\X/OODLAND'S PURSES HAVE ALL FILLED 
»» with the exception of the one offered for three 
year old trotters. This means that District No. 40 
will give one of the best meetings ever held in the 
State, as there is a high class of horses to compete in 
every event. The races for trotters will be the 2:12, 
2:15, 2:20 and 2:30 classes; those for pacers the free for 
all, 2:12, 2:1"), 2:20 and 2:30 classes Secretary Thomas 
telegraphs that all the above races have been declared 
filled and that the full list of entries will be sent in 
time for publication next week. 

TWKLVK BIG PURSES offered by the Los Angeles 
' Association for trotters and pacers close to-day. 
Turn to our advertising columns and It will bo seen 
that every class not already given in the events already 
closed, are there offered by the enterprising and ener- 
getic association of the southern metropolis. The Los 
Augeles meeting will be the best held in years and 
more money is offered the harness horse owners there 
than at any other place on the California Circuit. Let 
thore be a big, generous list of entries. They close 
to-day. 

EIGHT RUNNING STAKES offered by the State 
Agricultural Society, to be contested at the State 
Fair this year, close to-day. The conditions of these 
stake's are fully set forth in the advertisement which 
will be found in our business columns, and the owners 
of thoroughbreds should see that all entries are mailed 
in time. These stakes have from $.300 to $500 added in 
each instanco and are the richest stakes offered in 
California during the season of summer racing. En- 
tries close with Secretary Geo. W. Jackson at Sacra- 
mento to-day. 



\X/ESTCHESTER RACING ASSOCIATION con- 
» » duets annually at Morris Park one of the high- 
est class race meetings held in the world, ahd offers a 
large number of rich stakes for every meeting. Its 
annual announcement of these stakes is made in out- 
advertising columns to-day. We would call the especial 
attention of breeders to the events named to be run in 
1902, 1903 and for foals of this year to be run in 1904. 
Those of 1902 to be run at the spring meeting are the 
Juvenile, $2000 added, for two year olds, five furlongs; 
the Fashion, $1500 added, for two year old fillies, four 
and a half furlongs; the Eclipse, $4000 added, for two 
year olds, five and a half furlongs. At the autumn 
meeting the same year the Nursery Handicap, $2500 
added, for two year olds, will be run on the Eclipse 
course. In 1903, at the spring meeting, will be de 
cided the Withers, $2500 added, for three year olds 
which is run over tho Withers mile; the Ladies, $2000, 
for three year old fillies, also at tho Withers mile, and 
the 37th Belmont, $5000 added, for three year olds, 
one mile and a furlong over the hill. Mr. August Bel- 
mont adds plate to tho value of $1000 to this rich stake. 
For 1904, the 38th Belmont is offered. This historical 
race will close for foals of this year at $10 each, on 
Thursday, August 15th, and on the same date entries 
close on the other stakes above mentioned. 



There has been considerable speculation among the 
horsemen here as to why the judges at Cleveland fined 
Billy Durfee $100 in the 2:14 trot on July 23d. The 
latest report by mail is that they thought he was not 
trying to win, but it looks as if they wore making fish 
of one and flesh of another as the following from the 
Chicago Inter Ocean's report will show: "In the first 
race, the 2:14 trot, Dr. Book went to the post a strong 
favorite at even money. He won the first heat with 
speed to spare. In the second he heat he simply 
walked in a winner by three lengths, but the best he 
could do in the third heat was third place. The judges 
did not like the way Durfee handled Dr. Book in the 
heat and he was called to the stand. The explanation 
he furnished evidently did not satisfy the judges, as 
they fined him $100 for pulling his horse. In the next 
heat theCalifsrnia driver was requested to take a seat 
among the spectators, and Kenny was put up. At this 
stage of the game McCarthy, who had previously been 
bick in the ruck, and who might have been cited to 
explain why ho laid up the first three heats came on 
and won in straight heats. Kenney did not do as well 
as Durfee had done. 



Good Racing at Columbus. 

COLUMBUS (O.), July 29.— The Columbus Grand 
Circuit meeting opened auspiciously to-day with fair 
weather. A good crowd and some excellent racing 
were the features. Tho 2:14 pace was the first raco on 
the program and thirteen side-wheelers answered tho 
bell. Martha Marshall, driven by Andy McDowell, 
was installed favorite at $25 to $20 for the field. Cap- 
tain Sphinx won the first heat iu a drive from Winfield 
Stratton and Martha Marshall. 

The favorite took the next two heats, pacing tho 
second in 2:07}, reducing her record a full second. In 
the fourth and fifth heats she caused trouble while 
scoring and got away badly each time, giving Nouamie 
and Shecan a chance for a heat apiece. Only the four 
heat winners appeared for the sixth hoat, and Martha 
Marshall stepped to tho front at once and kept her 
position to tho wire. 

The 2:20 trot was a disappointment in that it had 
only four starters. Country fay, who was second to 
Eleata at both Detroit and Cleveland, was looked upon 
as a sure winner, but May Allen, an Indianapolis mare, 
took his measure, out-trotting him and winning three 
straight heats. 

The last, race was a gift to Dan Patch, the handsome 
son of Joe Patchen, who tiptoed his field and was never 
forced to go to the top of his speed. Summary: 

Pacing, 2:14 class, purse $2000— Martha Marshall 
won the second, third and sixth heats. Best time, 
2:07i. Shecan won the fifth heat in 2:2U. Captain 
Sphinx won tho first heat in 2:08J. Nouamie won the 
fourth heat in 2:11,'. Carnot, Furioso, Colonel Dick 
Thompson, Trinkle, Winfield Stratton, College Boy, 
Alvin R., Frank Yokum and Jackmont also started. 

Trotting, 2:23 class, purse $5000 — May Allen won in 
three straight heats. Best time, 2:09}. Country Jay, 
Neva Simmons and Vic Schiller also started. 

Pacing, 2:10 class, purse $2000 Dan Patch won in 
three straight heats. Best time, 2:10}. Frank Marri- 
ott, Paul Diugboy, Legal Hal and Barolette also started. 

July 20. — At tho Grand Circuit meeting to-day the 
2:20 pace, a $5000 early -closing stake, brought out 
such good ones as Audobon Boy, Star Pugh, Captain 
Brino, Shadow Chimes and Helen D. Audobon Boy 
was installed favorite, the pools avoraging $50 to $40 
on the field. Captain Brino showed a world of speed 
in the first heat, leading all the way. The mile was 
paced in 2:07A, the fastest time of the day. The effort 



was too much for the Brino horse and Audobon Boy 
went out and won the next three heats, reducing his 
record from 2:09$ to 2:08}. In the 2:17 trot Charlie 
Mac reduced his record and won a hard fought race. 

Pace, 2:20 class, purse $5000— Audobon Boy won the 
socond, third and fourth heats. Best time, 2:08} . 
Captain Brino won the first heat 2:07*. Star Pugh, 
Dick Lee, John H., Helen D., Shadow Chimes, Braden, 
C bailie Downing and Laura McCord also started. 

Trotting, 2:17 class, purse $2000— Charlie Mac won 
the second, third and fourth heats. Best time, 2:13}. 
Porto Rico won the first heat in 2:15}. Re-elected, 
Marique, Al K., Tivellino and Maggie V. also started. 

Trotting, 2:20 class, purse $2000— Ebba won in three 
straight heats. Best time, 2:141. Henrietta, Effie G., 
Hydra Stine, Phoenix Lassie, Ononta, Colonel Clary 
and Improvo also started. 

July 31. — Porfect woather and the largest crowd of 
the week greeted the grand circuit performers at the 
Driving Club this week. Last night's rain put the 
track in excellent condition and all three heat winners 
in the 2:09 pace broke their records, as did Onward 
Silver, winner of the 2:12 trot. 

Pace, 2:09 class, purse $2000— Stacker Taylor won 
first, fifth and sixth heats in 2:08}, 2:08}, 2:09}. George 
won second and third heats in 2:00}, 2:08. Carmine 
won the fourth heat in 2:07}. Effie Powers, White 
Hose, Red Seal, Argetta and Rey Direct also started- 

Trotting, 2:12 class, purse $2000 — Onward Silver won 
third, fourth and fifth heats in 2:11 J, 2:10J, 2:10',. 
Cornelia Belle won first and second heats in 2:11}, 2:11} 
Allan and Dolly Dillon also started. 

Trot, 2:14 class; purse $2000 (unfinished)— Dr. Book 
won first and second heats in 2:11}, 2:11}. Gracie 
Onward won third heat in 2:12} . Wauban won the 
fourth heat in 2:12}. Nancy King, A. J. D., and Dot 
Miller also started. 

August 1. — This was the big day of the Grand Dir. 
cuit meeting and more than 5000 poople watched the 
harness horses perform over the fast track. The 
weather was absolutely perfect, and all the conditions 
were conducive to excellent sport. 

Unfinished 2:14 trot, purse $2000 (four heats Wednes- 
day) — Dr. Book won tho first, second and sixth heats. 
Best time, 2:10',. Wauban won the fourth and fifth 
heats. Best time, 2:11}. Gracie Onward won tho 
third heat in 2:12',. Nancy King, A. J. D. and Dot 
Miller started. 

2:24 class, pacing, purse $2000— Dainty Queen won 
the third, fourth and fifth heats. Best time, 2:12}. 
Xava won the first fheat in 2:10}. Miss Gertrude won 
the second heat in 2:10} . Jean Cuyler, Charlie Hoffer 
and Ethel Brown also started. 

2:00 class, pacing, purse $2000 — Edith W. won the 
third, fourth and filth heats. Best time, 2:05j|. Hetty 
G. won the second heat in 2:05}. Bonnie Direct won 
the first heat in 2:05}. Eyelet, Milton S. and Egozen 
also started. 

2:25 class, trotting, purse $2000— Captor won the 
second, third and fourth heats. Best time, 2:12}. 
Captain Brocker won the first heat in 2:15}. Algonetta, 
Del Rio and Big Dutch also started. 

Answers to Correspondents. 



R. L.. San Diego— Cornelius 11,335, the sire of the 
mare Carim-lita that paced to a record of 2:10] this 
year, is by Nutwood 000, first dam Jennie G. by Echo 
402, second dam Jennie Noyes, a mare whose breeding 
is untraced. Cornelius is a bay horse, foaled 1882, was 
bred by Con Mooney of San Francisco, and is now 
owned by J. B. Haggin. The mare Jennie Noyes had 
a record of 2:40 and is tho dam of Gus 2:26jj. 

H. J. G., Paanilo, H. I. — Please give mo through 
your query and answor column tho following: The 
dam of Liz Givens by imp. Langford. First and sec- 
ond dams of Vincente Nolto by Am. Eclipse. If there 
is a thoroughbred mare by Alta, registered under the 
name of Alta Mia, or Altamia, please give her breeding':' 

Ans. — The dam of Liz Givens was Charlotte Pace by 
Sir Archy, socond dam by imported Restless, third 
dam by Celer, fourth dam by Partner, fifth dam- by- 
Apollo. Tho first dam of Vincente Nolte by American 
Eclipse was Hortensia by Contention, second dam a 
mare by Perfection. There is no mare of that name 
by Alta registered in any volumes of the Stud Book- 
up to and including Vol. VII, which was issued in 1898. 

G. & S., Haywards — In your next issue will you 
please give the extended pedigree of Nutwood 2:18| to 
settle a dispute. One man says Belmont 04 was by 
Hambletonian 10 (Rysdyks), aud the other says by 
Abdallah. 

Ans. — Nutwood 2:18j} was by Belmont 04, he by Ab- 
dallab 15, and he by Hambletonian 10. The dam of 
Nutwood was Miss Russell (dam of Maud S. 2:08:}, etc.), 
by Pilot Jr. 12, next dam Sally Russell by Boston, etc. 

Johnny Armstrong. 

Poor Fred Archer had a keen sense of humor as 
ucll as an emphatic style of expressing his views on 
racing and things in general. 

"What was your jockey doing?" inquired Fred on 
one occasion, after a race at Newmarket of the owner 
of the second, which had started a hot favorite, and 
in reality could have won by the length of the street. 

"Oh! well — a — "replied tho shady owner, "you see 
— a — the pcor boy broke a stirrup-leather!" 

"Broke a stirrup-leather!" repeated the Tinman, 
with scorn. "Yes; and he d — d near broke tho reins, 
too!" 



August 3, 1901] 



®he Creche* cixxb gtpjctrtsmmt 



6 



CRESCEUS THE GREAT. 



Trots to a World's Record 
Cleveland. 



of 2 :o2 3-4 at 



Cleveland, Ohio, July 20, 15)01 . 
When, to the surprise of everybody, the chestnut 
son of Robert McGregor Hashed under the wire to-day 
in 2:02], it was simply a case of the greatest trotter 
America has overproduced assuming- his rightful title 
of king. For over a year he has been king in deed, if 
not in name, and if the long-dreamed-of two-minute 
trotter is to put in his appearance, Cresceus is likely to 
be his name. 

The circumstances connected with this remarkable 
performance were anything but conducive to fast time 
as, owing to the heavy rains of last night, the track 
was not in the best of condition to-day, and it was 
about 6:30 p. M. before the track was deemed to be in 
sufficient good shape to warrant making the attempt. 
At that time the sun's heat had been replaced by cool 
breezes. Even then there were but very few horsemen 
that looked for a mile better than 2:05. 

HOW THE MILE WAS MADE. 

After going a few preliminary miles, George Ketcham 
came out with the stallion to attempt what seemed an 
impossible feat. He nodded for the word on the third 
score, the horse trotting true and strong. 

Accompanied by a runner, the chestnut stallion 
fairly flew to the quarter, the timers watches register- 
ing just thirty seconds flat. 

As Cresceus swung into the back stretch he was 
joined by a second runner, and although many pre 
dieted that the footing was such as would retard his 
speed, ho reached the half in 1:01. As the time was 
hung out the immense crowd broke out in cheers, as it 
was evident that the mile would be a fast one. 

The three-quarters pole was reached in 1:31]. and as 
the great stallion trotted into the stretch, a runner on 
either side, his frictionless, machine-like stride was 
fairly eating up the distance. 

Never once faltering, notwithstanding the terrific 
clip, he fairly flew to the wire, being sustained only by 
his indomitable courage and almost human intelligence 
not being touched once by the whip, his sole urging 
being the driver's voice and the whacking hoofbeats 
of the accompanying runners. 

As the time for the mile was announced — 2:02] - and 
the immense crowd realized that a new world's record 
had been established, Ketcham and his favorite stallion 
were tendered an ovation such as has been but seldom 
witnessed on a race track. Thousands of enthusiastic 
people rushed out on the track, and Ketcham was 
lifted from his sulky and carried to the grandstand on 
the shoulders of admirers. Cheer after cheer was 
given, while shouts of "Cresceus!" and "Ketcham!" 
"Ketcham!" rent the air. The owner of the sturdy 
stallion was almost carried to the judges' stand, where 
he delivered a brief address. 

George H. Ketcham deserves much credit for the re- 
markable achievement of the great son of Robert Mc- 
Gregor, as -he has the proud distinction of not only 
owning the world's champion trotter, but also having 
bred him and driven him in all of his races from the 
time he was a three year old 

THE GOAL OF HORSEMEN'S AMBITION. 

From the time when David Bryan, at the old Beacon 




ZEPHYR, by Zombro 2:11— Gazelle 2:1 I 1- 
The Three-year-old Filly that sold for *'.I0<>0. 



course at Hoboken. N. J., on Oct. 13, 1818, drove Lady 
Suffolk a mile in 2:2i)J, the greatest ambition of every 
breeder, owner or driver of a trotting horse has been 
to own the world's champion, and the one great effort 
of every breeder in later years has been to raise one 
that would finally knock off the 2!)i seconds of the first 
standard record — the two-minute trotter being the 
ooveted goal. The struggle has been going on for over 
years, and, while the record has been reduced thirty- 
five times by sixteen different horses, the total reduc- 
tion for the half century has just been 2(ii| seconds. 

From Lady Suffolk's time it is only necessary to 
mention the names of the successive champions to re- 
call tho prowess of such turf idols as Flora Temple, 
Dexter, Goldsmith Maid, Rarus, St. Julien and the 
never to be forgotten Maud S., as well as the later day 
kings and queens, Sunol, Jay Eye See, Nancy Hanks, 
sweet little Alix, and the now deposed The Abbot, 
who, still sick from his recent attack of distemper, had 
to stand in a near-by stall and listen to the acclaim 
that greeted his forced abdication of tho crown his 
head has worn so uneasily since the 25th of last Sep- 
tember, at which time by trotting in 2:03|, he clipped 
a half second off Queen Alix time that had stood for 
six years. 

CHAMPION OF CHAMPIONS. 

Cresceus is now not only king of all trotters, but in 
his varied career of four yoars he has placed the fol- 
lowing championship records to his credit: 

Fastest time ever made by a trotter 2:02?.i 

Fastest time on half-mile track 2:09% 

Fastest heat in a race t 2:05 

Fastest second heat : 2:05 

Fastest eighth heat 2:11^ 

Fastest two-heat race _ 2:08!4, 2:05 

Fastest three heats by a stallion 2:07 ,/ 2 . 2:0fi, 2:0(5 

Fastest five-heat race— Cresceus winning last three 

2:0714, 2:07H, 2:07)4, 2.07'/&, 2:08!< 

Fastest eight-heat race— Cresceus winning second, seventh 

and eighth. .2:15)4, 2:13!<f, 2:12>4, 2:12>4. 2:14J4, 2:12!4, 2:11^, 2:11'^ 



The famous mile track at Cleveland must also be 
given considerable credit for the part it has played in 
making turf history. The Grand Circuit meeting at 
Cleveland is always looked forward to with great an- 
ticipation by the horse world, as at this meeting the 
best trotters and pacers of the West clash for the first 
time in the season with the fast performers from the 
East and South, and not only has this assured fast and 
interesting racing, but that nearly every meeting in 
years gone by one or more of the world's trotting and 
pacing records have been shattered. 

The former trotting queen, Maud S., made her rec- 
ord of 2:08] to a high wheel sulky over this famous 
course, which time has nevar been equaled to a similar 
hitch. Since that time numerous minor records have 
been established, and last September Cresceus trotted 
to the world's stallion record of 2:04 over this track. 
His remarkable and almost phenomenal performance 
to-day was a fitting climax for one of the most success- 
ful race meetings ever held in Clevoland. 



Cresceus to Come to This Coast. 



The following dispatch was sent out from Toledo, 
Ohio, by tho Associated Press on Monday last: 

Toledo (O.), July 29th— George Ketchum, owner 
and driver of Cresceus, the world's champion trotter, 
announced to-day that he would spend next winter on 
tho Pacific Coast, where the famons horse will givb 
speed exhibitions. He will stop at Denver, Salt Lake 
City, Sacramento, San Francisco and Los Angeles. 





By McKinney, dam Stemwinder, dam of Directum 2:05J4. 

TWO PROMISING TIIRKK-YK AR-OU) III.MKS 

Recently purchased from Green Estate by H. L. Frank of Montana 



By McKinney. dam by Son of Venture. 



[August 3, 190] 




Cresceus 2:02J. 

Champion of champions. 

Santa Rosa entries close to-day. 

Dan Patch 2:071 is an honor to his dad. 

Diablo 2:09$ has a great son in Sir Albert S. 2:111. 

Were Eden Vale a sound horse he would pace in 2:10. 

Cricket 2:10 has a standard performer in Iloilo 2:291. 



Thornway finished up a close third in 2:10 at Cleve- 
land. 

Pathmark by Pathmont, has reduced his record 
to 2:15J. 

Barring hopples did not prevent Readville from fill- 
ing ev ery class. 

The next big stake is the $10,000 froe for all at 
Brighton Beach. 

Hetty G. promises to dethrone Lady of the Manor 
2:04}, as queen of pacers. 

Dolly Dillon knocked a quarter of a second off her 
record at Detroit. It is now 2:11 J. 

Will Anaconda step in two minutes? It begins to 
look as though he has a chance to do so. 



Geo. B. Kelly will receive entries for the Santa Rosa 
meeting. He is at the Sacramento track to-day. 

William G. Layng will hold an auction sale of Palo 
Alto horses on the lf>th inst. See advertisement. 



Diodine 2:25 is a new comer to Diablo's list of stand- 
ard pacers. She took her record last month in Oregon. 

An odd fact in connection with the $16,000 Metallas 
is that not one of his ancestors had a standard record. 



Dr. Book's race at Cleveland was very creditable. 
As will be seen by the summary he was in the fight all 
the time. 

Van Bokkelen landed Vic Shellar a close second in 
2:121 at Cleveland, which shows that the horse is im- 
proving. 

Brown Hal 2:121, is now the leading sire of 2:10 pac- 
ers, with seven inside the list headed by the champion 
Star Pointer. 

When you read that the Santa Rosa entries close 
to-day, August 3d, make out your entries right away 
and mail them. 



Eula Mac was a good third in a heat won by All 
Right in 2:13 at Cleveland. Charley Mac won the race 
in the sixth heat. 



The program for to-day at Sacramento should draw 
a big crowd to the track. The 2:20 trot and 2:17 pace 
will be won in fast time. 



They are looking for Freddy C. to make Sir Albei t 
S. stretch his neck to-day. El Diablo ought to be close 
to him at the wire also. 



The McKinney gelding Cornelius D. that Walter 
Mabon started in the 2:40 trot will be a 2:20 performer 
for McKinney before long. 



Our Boy's Sister got second money in the 2:25 pace 
at Sacramento last Monday and was separately timed 
two heats better than 2:14. 



McKinney's daughter Nora McKinney trotted a great 
race Tuesday for a mare that was dangerously ill two 
weeks previous to that date. 



Patron 2:14}, is dead. He won the Charter Oak 
stake in 1887, and was the sire of Ananias 2:05, and 
thirteen other 2:20 performers. 



Two races in one week at Cleveland is a pretty good 
showing for Charlie Mac. He won also at Columbus 
and reduced his record to 2:134. 

G. Y. Bollinger of San Jose owns a great mare in tho 
dam of Our Boy's Sister. She will have one or two 
more in tho list in another year. 



Eight trotters and five pacers won $1000 or more at 
the Detroit meeting, and the grand total distributed 
among tho horsemen there was $48,595. 

Brown Hal 2:121 now leads all sires as regards 2:10 
performers, with eight such to his credit. His new 
ones aro New Richmond 2:091 and Braden 2:10. 



What Is It 2:16} by Direct 2:054 out of the dam of 
Who Is It 2:10} and Dolly Marchutz 2:19}, is one of the 
best gaited trotters in this or any other country. 

- Nick Hubinger was the plunger who bought nearly 
all the tickets on Harry Logan at Detroit and he paid 
$200 each for the pasteboards that he lore up after the 
race. 

Frank Williams, the owner of Charley Hayt2:06}, de- 
clares that he would not take less than $15,000 for that 
horse, and says he expects him to pace in 2:03 this 
season. 

Three heats better than 2:13 in the first race of the 
season for the green pacers shows that the California 
horses that stay here are about as good as those that 
go abroad. 



Don't fail to enter at Santa Rosa. It will be one of 
the best meetings ever held in the town. 

Harry Hurst, the pacer by Delwin that was formerly 
in Fred Chadbourne's string at Pleasanton, and was 
taken north by John Sawyer, has paced to a record of 
2:241 in a race. 

Eleata was saved for this year's M. & M. through 
the efforts of Tom Marsh. Her owner, Hon. Frank 
Jones, intended to race her last year, but wisely 
listened to his trainer. 

It is a singular coincidence that McHenry, the man 
who had John R. Gentry in his palmy days, should 
now be riding in front behind a son of the little red 
horse's lifelong rival, JoePatchen. 

Col. Higby's fine colt Stam Medium is going great 
guns at the local track. On Saturday he pulled a 
heavy cart an eighth of a mile in fifteen seconds. This 
is a two minute clip. — Salinax Journal. 

It is safe to say that Allerton has been bred to more 
good mares this season than any stallion in America. 
There is such a great demand for his services, that his 
fee will probably be increased next year. 

R. I. Orr, of Hollister has taken his fine colt Oro 
Guy home and will turn him out until next year. Oro 
Guy can show a mile in 2:20 and if nothing happens him 
will get a mark much below those figures. 

There was a rumor at Sacramento this week that 
Dr. Boucher was on his way home with his pacer 
Harry Logan 2:12} . The pace is a little too hot for the 
the big four year old in his present condition. 

A chance to get something good. Fifty horses from 
Palo Alto Stock Farm will be sold at the Occidental 
Horse Exchange in this city August 15th. Eleata, this 
years winner of the M. & M., was sold at auction by 
this farm. 



There were hopples on four out of the ten starters 
in tho 2:25 pace at Sacramento. These were Alsandy, 
Bankers Daughter, Harry J. and Our Boy's Sister. 
The first three were distanced and the last named got 
second money. 

Those who were so sure in the spring that Jack 
Trout would not get along well with the California geld- 
ing will have to acknowledge that they were wrong, as 
the Detroit race was the best race Anaconda ever 
paced in his life. 

How do you account for Durfee Mac backing up so 
after a fast mile. The McKinney's are game, tho dam 
of Durfee Mac is by Nephew a horse whose get are 
noted for gameness, while his grandson is by Gen. 
Taylor, the 30-mile champion. 

The betting has been very brisk at Cleveland, about 
$55,000 being paid into the auction pools on Monday, 
and Tuesday was estimated to have been tho best 
betting' day of the Grand Circuit this season with tho 
exception of M. & M day at Detroit. 



Nellie I., the chestnut mare by Gossiper that Billy 
Donathan drove in the 2:25 pace Monday has lots of 
speed and will get there later on. She took a record 
of 2:24} down at Santa Barbara July 5th this year. 
Nothing is known of her dam's breeding. 



At the Detroit 1900 meeting 66 heats were trotted 
and paced which averaged 2:13 11-100. An unusual 
coincidence is the fact that exactly the same number 
of heats were contested this year, but the average time 
was 2:11 23-100, a reduction of nearly two seconds. 



Algonetta, Mr. Mulcahey's mare by Eros is now in 
Millard Sander's string. In her race at Cleveland she 
won the first heat in 2:14 and was a close second in 
both the others won by Coxey in 2:151 and 2:13}. She 
trotted a game race and had a half dozen good horses 
behind her. 



Adrian Wilkes son of George Wilkes and sire of Roy 
Wilkes 2:061. died at Williams Valley Stock Farm last 
Saturday, at 24 yoars of age. While Adrian Wilkes 
had sired fifty-four standard performers twelve of 
them with records below 2:15, the pacer Roy Wilkes 
was his only representative in the 2:10 list. 

The report going the rounds of the various turf 
journals that Lord Derby 2:07 may not be seen in pub- 
lic this year is incorrect. This fast trotter is taking 
his work nicely and Mr. Geers gave him a mile in 2:091 
last week, tho half being in 1:03. He is looking splendid 
and when he turns for the word will bear watching. 



The Abbot has been engaged to trot against the 
gelding's record of 2:03} (his own) at the Syracuse meet- 
ing in September, which includes the State Fair and a 
Grand Circuit meeting. The Abbot, after his recent 
indisposition, is doing a little work, and it is to be 
hoped that he will be able to fill his engagements at 
Brighton Beach and Syracuse. 

There is a difference of opinion among experts as to 
whether the lifo of a pneumatic tire is best expressed 
in years or miles. It is often said that with ordinary 
use, a rubber tire of this type will last two or three 
years. But some experienced builders assert that a 
tire will not last more than two years on an average, 
if never used. The rubber loses its life in this length 
of time, so it is said. 

George W. Leavitt, of Boston, in speaking of his 
great two year old colt, Todd by Bingen, recently said: 
"As sure as can be no two year old was ever foaled 
that is so fast with so little training as is Todd. 
Though he never stepped a mile at speed till ho arrived 
at Readville in June, yet Arion or Bingen could not 
begin to show tho speed he has when they were the 
same age — that is, so early in the season. Can you 
blame me for thinking I have the chance to set a new 
two year old record for the world with Todd?" 



Dr. Monical 2:09J, the five year old brown stallion by 
Gambetta Wilkes 2:19'. dam Me Too by C. F.Clay 
2:18, that has been making such a splendid' showing in 
in the West, is thought by manv who saw him per- 
form to be able to go close to 2:05 right now. He is 
tho fifth 2:10 performer for Gambetta Wilkes. 

"The man who misrepresents the breeding of a 
horse and makes a sale on the strength of it obtains 
money under false pretenses and should bo made to 
suffer," remarks the Horse Breeder. "The only safe 
way is to buy of honorable, reliable dealers, men who 
have the means to make their word good, as well as 
the disposition to do so. A word to those who have 
common sense is sufficient " 

The filly Rosalind, that won a half mile heat at 
Kocklin, July 4th, this year, making one of the heats 
in the good time of 1:11}, is a trotter and not a pacer 
as reported. She was taken off a grass pasture just 
three weeks before the race, given very little work and 
her showing is therefore remarkable. Her sire is 
Stam B. 2:11} and she is owned by M. H. Tuttle, of 
Rocklin. 



The fastest horse by tho records in Virginia is the 
giant bay gelding Mosul 2:09} by Sultan, dam Virginia 
Maid bv Sam Purdy. James' R. Keene, who once 
owned Sam Purdy. gave the stallion years ago to his 
brother-in-law, Major Dangerfield, who stood him for 
a long time at Harrisburg, Virginia. Major Danger- 
field now manages the famous Castleton Farm in 
Kentucky. 

The Oregon Stake of $1500 for foals of 1900, to be 
raced for in 1902, at the Oregon State Fair, closed with 
sixty entries. A lot of well bred colts and fillies have 
been named and no owner has more than four entries. 
Among the stallions represented are McKinnoy, 
Zombro, Capt. Jones, Stam B., Nutwood Wilkes, 
Coeur de'Alene, Montana Director, Holmdel. Bonner 
N. B., Lovelace and others. The large entry list is 
proof of the popularity of such stakes. 

Mr. H. L. Frank, owner of the McKinney colt Ben 
Liebes, will not have him started this year, but will 
race him over East next year. Mr. Frank recently 
purchased three fillies by McKinney from the Green 
estate. Two are out of the famous mare Stemwinder, 
dam of Directum 2:05.}, one being three, the other two 
yoars old. The third is a three year old, out of a 
mare bred very much as Stemwinder is. 



The full extent of tho havoc wrought among horses 
in New York by the recent hot wave is just beginning 
to be realized, so the dealers say. Developments of 
the last few days indicate that thousands of animals 
that escaped death were affected by tho burning rays 
of the sun and are now disabled whenever the mercury 
gets up above the point of summer heat. Horsemen 
say these horses are practically ruined for hard work 
in hot weather, as they will never fully recover. 

One of the greatest, if not the greatest yearling 
filly the turf ever knew was Leone by Lancelot, a son 
of Messenger Duroc and Green Mountain Maid. In 
1892 she won six races and a second money in seven 
starts, trotting 12 full miles of which her last in 2:281, 
was the world's record for her age. Last month she be- 
came a great broodmare at ten years of age, her second 
in the list being the four year old filly Kdna Dillon, 
that trotted to a record of 2:23 }, and hor other per- 
former Lord Linton, also proved a winner last month, 
trotting to a now record of 2:15}. Both are bv Barou 
Dillon 2:12. 



Peko was hooked to sulky Friday for the first time 
in years. She worked a mile as follows: 0:331, 0:321, 
0:331, 0:33, 2:121. It was a much easier mile "for her 
than any she ever trotted to wagon in 2:15, and no 
effort was made with the idea of having her go a fast 
milo Track was soft and strong wind blowing up the 
stretch. She did not tire as she does in a wagon. 
With her there is no doubt two to two and a half sec- 
onds difference between sulky and wagon. John A. 
McKerron worked his best mile to date, 2:151, half 1:05, 
quarter 32 seconds, last eighth 141 seconds, and he 
seemed to go this high rate quite comfortably and 
without much driving. — Cleveland Sportsman. 



Tom Brennon of Bo?ton, better known as "Gamey" 
had the result of the M. and M. down pat. They sold 
a few pools on the ra3o at Old Orchard, and Eleata 
brought 2 to 1 over the field. During a lull "Gamey" 
spoke up saying: "I hat's right, you short enders, 
blow your coin. I switched my junk on that black 
filly after her race at Dover and caught her a quarter 
in 30 seconds That showed me. Those wild gyps at. 
Detroit will remember Marsh and Kingmond and will 
lay up a couple of heat9. Then they will turn Neva 
Simmons, Country Jay and the rest of the bunch 
loose. That's all tho good it will do them, too, for 
Eleata will make monkeys of them. Cattle of that 
kind boatiher! well I guess not. Cresceus, The Abbot 
and Boralma have got a chance with her, and all tho 
others aro dead ones." 

There are trotters by Dexter Prince whose pedigrees 
show a much deeper piling up of trotting crosses on 
the dam's side than does that of Eleata, and yet Eleata 
2:08^ holds a faster record than any other son or 
daughter of Dexter Prince. A horseman when speak- 
ing of her chances last Monday of winning the M. & 
M. at Detroit, expressed doubt of her ability to do »o. 
He said that her stride was so great and her gait so 
pure that she would tire before the race was over. Her 
third mile in 2:08^, with tho middle half in 1:04 and the 
third quarter in 31| seconds, shows that she has re- 
markable staying qualities, thanks to her dam's thor- 
oughbred racing ancestors, and also those of her sire's 
dam through Seely's American Star. Many of the 
pure gaited trotters in tho past, especially those raised 
in New England, have not boen able to light out split- 
heat races successfully. Tho trouble in most cases has 
been a lack of near race-winning thoroughbred crosses 
of the right kind. — American Horse Breeder. 



August :!, 1901] 



&he gvieebev rent* &p0v%&tnan 



7 



The Horse of the Year. 



The question, "Which is the horse of the year?" 
comes around as regularly as the racing season, and 
once the discussion begins there is no stopping it until 
well after all the dates on the racing calendar have 
been filled, says the New York Sun. Even then tho 
question is rarely settled to the satisfaction of all those 
interested in its solution. It often happens that "the 
horse of the year" is two horses. Each has its parti- 
sans, and they will argue themselves blue in trying to 
convince tho other fellows that their choice is tho real 
champion. At the end of last year, for instance, the 
friends of Kinley Mack and the friends of Ethelbert 
were no more willing to agree as to which was the 
faster of the two than they were at the beginning. 

The summer racing season on the metropolitan cir- 
cuit will close in about two weeks with the meeting at 
Brighton Beach. The horses have been traveling the 
tracks since April, and yet there is nothing very posi- 
tive about "the horse of the year." This is undoubt- 
edly due to the evident fact that the real champion 
has yet to prove his title. Kinley Mack's legs doubled 
under him before he appeared in public, Ethelbert 
went stale, and Wax Taper and Prince of Melbourne 
and King Bramble must do more racing before serious 
consideration can be given to them. Brigadier flashed 
in the pan, and Voter has been kept too much in the 
stable. Roehampton, a throe-year-old, has been one 
of the most consistent performers of any age. but he 
must meet some of the other high-class three-year-olds 
and some of the all-agers, like Prince of Melbourne, 
to prove that he is made of high-class stuff. 

A few weeks ago the track rang with praises of Com- 
mando. He seemed to be as invincible a three-year-old 
as he was a two-year-old. But one day the great son 
of Domino was asked to go a furlong further than he 
had ever gone before, and The Parader took his meas- 
ure. Yet in so doing the son of Longstreet by no 
means cleared the title to the championship. Com- 
mando beat him every time they had met before, and 
a colt named Robert Waddell, of no particular preten- 
sions to class, raced The Parader off his feet in the 
American Derby at Chicago. To be sure, The Parader 
had traveled nearly half across the continent to enter 
that race, and some fault was found with the way he 
was ridden, but too many excuses must not be offered 
for i- the horse of the year." After Commando's de- 
feat by The Parader it was discovered that he had a 
cracked hoof. Cracked hoofs are not easy to cure, 
and maybe it will be another year before we shall 
know just how good Commando is. And then there is 
Conroy, the sturdy son of St. Leonards, which ploughed 
his way through mud fetlock deep in tho Brooklyn 
Handicap, and showed that he could give any man a 
run for his money. But Conroy cannot aspire to 
championshij) honors on a single race, although he is 
the first three-year-old to win the Brooklyn Handicap. 

The races at Saratoga have yet to be run, and the 
fall meetings at Sheepshead Bay, Gravesend, Morris 
Park and Aqueduct are yet open for the clearing of 
titles. Before the question can be satisfactorily set- 
tled, however, some standards must be established by 
which to judge "the horse of the year." What must 
he achieve in order to be declared the champion? 
Shall he be elected because of his winning a few fash- 
ionable stakes from noted company? Or, because run- 
ning in all kinds of weather and in all kinds of company 
and at all kinds of distances, he fought his battles as 
he found them, and got the money? It was by such a 
standard that " the horse of the year" was judged in 
the old days of the American turf. In the days of 
Kingfisher and Enquirer, of Harry Bassott and Long- 
fellow and Preakness and Glenelg, of Alarm and Tom 
Bowling and Springbok and Buckdon, that horso was 
declared tho champion which picked up his burden, 
whatever it might be, and carried it first past the win- 
ning post most frequently, no matter what his oppo- 
nents might bo or whence they came. 

Before Commando was beaten by The Parader it 
was often said that this particular three-year-old of 
Mr. Keeno's was the greatest horso which had ap- 
peared in a decade, and that it was only about once in 
ten years that a really great thoroughbred was pro- 
duced. 4 

Great thoroughbreds have had a habit of appearing 
oftener than once in a decade, and tho probabilities 
are that tho habit will continue. In 1870 there were 
three. Kingfisher and Enquirer divided the honors 
.n the throe year old division, and Holmbold was prob- 
ably the best of the all-agers. Longfellow was a three- 
year old in 1870, but he did not reveal his real quality 
until the following year. Then Henry Bassott and 
Salina were three year olds, and who shall say that 
these were not groat racehorses? Harry Bassott and 
Longfellow, the latter Bassett's senior by one year, 
met and raced and wallopod each other until the ir 
performances made tho year famous on the American 
turf. In 1872 there were tho memorable contests be- 
tween Woodbine and Eolus;and Fellowcraft and Buck- 
den and Alarm fought it out for championship honors 



in the three vear old division. In 1873, there were 
Catesby and Slyboots and Tom Bowling. All horses 
that left their impress on the American turf, and they 
followed each other in quick succession. 

Coming down the years, Duke of Magonta and Him- 
yar, the siro of Domino, and Bramble and Piquo were 
throe year olds that fought for the championship in 
1878. Duke of Magenta won the title, becauso he 
suffered but one defeat, and won the most money. 
Himyar was a close second, and Bramble was not far 
behind. In 1879, Harold and Kingston and Ferida, 
that wonderful mare of George L. Lorillard's that 
never found a journey too long, and Uncas and Moni- 
tor and Spendthrift were the throe year olds thaMent 
lustre to their yoar. In 1880, Luke Blackburn, perhaps 
the greatest of the get of Bonnie Scotland and the 
groatest horse, in their opinion, ever owned by the 
Brothers Dwyer, appeared, and it did not take him 
long to prove that he was, without the shadow of a 
doubt, the best of his yoar. 

A different story might have been told had Pierre 
Lorillard's Sensation, of the same age as Luke Black- 
burn, continued, as a three year old, his whirlwind 
record of the year bofore. When Sensation was a two 
year old there was nothing on four legs of equal years 
that he could not beat. The record shows that great 
horses followed immediately after Luke Blackburn and 
Sensation, for in 1881 Hindoo and Thora were winning 
the races for three year olds. And then followed 
Runnymede and Barnes and Drake Carter and Boot- 
jack and Pearl Jennings and Getaway and Eole and 
M iss Woodford and Salvator and Tenny straight down 
to tho days of Hanover and Tremont, Handspring and 

Requital, The Butterflies, Hastings, Domino, Dobbins 
and Hamburg. 

This is the recent record of the blue book of the 
American turf. It shows that the great thorough- 
breds have not been so far apart. The record also 
shows that the horses entitled to be called truly great 
were the horses that asked and took no particular 
odds from any of the runners of their time. By this 
standard the champion of this year may be chosen. If 
Conroy can perform again as he did in the Brooklyn 
Handicap, if he can win races in any kind of going and 
company, he will come pretty near having a clean title 
to the championship of 1901. 



Results at Butte. 



Stakes for the Winter Meeting. 

The new California Jockey|Club has issued the books 
containing the stake events for next winter's racing. 
There are twenty-five stakes, aggregating $5(>,000 in 
value. The increase in the number of stakes is due to 
the fact that the new California Jockey Club will not 
divide dates with any other club, a departure from the 
custom for several years past. 

The principal new stakes are the California Derby 
for $3000, the California Oaks for $2500, the Water- 
house handicap of 8^500 at two miles, the Bell stake 
for two year olds for $2000 and the Adam Andrew 
selling stake, the Crocker handicap and the Christmas 
handicap of $3000 at one and one-eighth miles. 

The following ten stakes to be run the first part of 
tho meeting will close on September 16th: 

$1500 — The Opening Handicap, three year olds and 
up, one mile; $1500 — Produce Exchange Stakes, two 
year olds, six furlongs; $1500 — Golden Gate Soiling 
Stakes, three year olds and up, seven furlongs; $1500 — 
Crocker Handicap, two and three year olds, six and 
one-half furlongs; $2500 — Tho Thanksgiving Handicap, 
three year olds and up, one and one-eighth miles; $1500 
— The Burlingame Selling Stakes, three year olds and 
up, one and one-sixteenth miles; $1500 — The Trux 
Beale Handicap, three year olds and up, one mile; 
$1500— The Junior Stakes, two year olds, seven fur- 
longs; $3000 — Tho Christmas Handicap, three yoar olds 
and up. one and one-quartor miles; $2000 — Tho New 
Year's Handicap, throe year olds and up, one and ono- 
eighth miles. 

Entries for the following events will close on Novem- 
ber 4th: 

$10,000 — Tho Burns Handicap, throo year olds and 
up, onoand one-quarter miles; $3000 — Thornton Stakes, 
three year olds and up, four miles; $3000 — The Califor- 
nia Derby, three year olds, one and one-quarter miles; 
$2500 — The California Oaks, three year old fillies, one 
and one-eighth miles; $2500 — Tho Waterhouso Handi- 
cap, throe year olds and up, two miles; $2000 — The 
Palace Hotel Handicap, throo yoar olds and up, ono 
and ono-eighth miles; $2000 — The Bell Stakes, two year 
olds, five furlongs; $200 — The Pacific Union Handicap, 
throe year olds, one and one-sixteenth milos; $1500 — 
The Adam Andrew Soiling Stakes, three year olds and 
up, one and one-sixteenth miles; $1500 — The Lissak 
Handicap, three year olds and up, ono mile; $1500 — 
The McLaughlin Selling Stakes, three yoar olds and 
up, ono and one-eighth miles; $1500 — The Naglee Sell- 
ing Stakes, four yoar olds and up, six and one-half fur- 
longs; $1500 — The Gunst Handicap, threo year olds and 
up, one milo; $1500 — Tho follansboo High-weight 
Handicap, three year olds and up, seven furlongs; 
$2000 — Tho Gebhard Handicap, two year olds, Futur- 
ity course. 

In addition to the above evonts there are to bo 
special races at intervals with $500 to $1000 added. 
The racing season is to begin over tho Tanforan track, 
on Saturday, November 2d. A special condition of in- 
terest to horeemon reads: 

No selling stake or race shall be a claiming race, un- 
less so specified in the conditions. 



July 25. Pacing, 2:25 class, two in three— J. D. won, 
Tim Burns second, Lady Amnion third. Best time. 
2:21}. 

Six furlongs — Nimrod won, Abbyleix I. second, Au- 
rlffera third. Time, 1:17. 

Four and a half furlongs — Alary 's Garter won, Dev- 
ereaux second, Ned Dennis third. Time, 0:57L 

Six furlongs — Mountain Queen won, Jim Hale sec- 
ond, Kitty Kelly third. Time, 1:15. 

Five furlongs — Shell Mount won, Pirate Maid sec- 
ond, Poppor Sauce third. Time, 1:03. 

One mile — Old Fox won. Rio Chico second, Sweet 
Voice third. Time, 1:44:}. 

July 26. Five and one-half furlongs — Lucy White 
won, Nod Donnis second, Blanche Sheppard third. 
Time, 1:10}. 

Six furlongs, selling — Foul Play won. Ping second, 
Toribe third. Timo, 1:15}. 

One mile and one-sixteenth — Ken ova won, Ting-a- 
Ling second, St. Gormaino third. Time, 1:50. 

Five and one-half furlongs — Decape won, Duckoy 
second, Admoor third. Time, 1:09. 

Four furlongs— Mid love won, High Hoe second, 
Henest John third. Time, 0:48}. 

One mile and an eighth — Sam Green won, Joo Bell 
second, Ace third. Time, 2:07}. 

July 27. Pacing — Oregon Bull won, Irwin C. second, 
Hardcase third. Best time, 2:18}. 

Five furlongs — Abba L. won, Admoor second, Don 

H. third. Time, 1:01. 

Five and one-half furlongs — Dandy won, Tyr annus 
second, Yellowstone third. Time, 1:08}. 

Six furlongs — Foul Play won. Miss Remsen second, 
Sweet Caporal third. Time, 1:15. . 

Five furlongs — Sir Dougall won, Midlove second, 
True Blue third. Time, 1:00}, 

One mile — Sylvan Lass won, Spike second, Monte- 
lade third. Time, 1:42.1. 

One mile and one-sixteenth — Silver Coin won, Mont- 
eagle second, Major King third. Timo, 1:51. 

July 29. Seven furlongs — Joe R. won, Sea Song sec- 
ond, Mr. Robinson third. Time 1:30}. 

Five furlongs— Paraquaide won, Louwelsea second, 
You You third. Time 2:02}. 

Five furlongs — High Hoo won, Ellis Glenn second, 
Aunt Mary third. Time 1:01. 

One mile — Virgie d'Or won, Barney F. second, Ida 
V. third. Timo 1:42}. 

Six furlongs — Alaria won, July Jip second, Yule 
third. Time 1:15}. 

Three and one-half furlongs — Abba L. won. Jack 
second, Walkapaugh third. Time 1:42. 

July 30 — Pacing, two in threo — Chub Wilkes won, J. 
D. second, Pebble third. Best time 2:17}. 

Five furlongs — Pepper Sauce won, Prestonian second, 
Tufts third. Time 1:02}. 

Five and a half furlongs — Blanche Sheppard won, 
Ned Dennis second, Little Henry third. Time 1:09. 

Six and a half furlongs — George H. Ketchum won, 
Miss Remsen second, Monday third. Time 1:21}, 
breaking the track record. 

One mile and seventy yards — Domsie won, Ping 
second, Major King third. Time 1:47.]. 

One mile and a quarter, five hurdles, carrying 160 
pounds — Odd Eyes won, Joo Bell second, Capri vl third. 
Time 2:19. 

July 31. Fiveand one-half furlongs — Tyrannus won, 
Estado second, Pirate Maid third. Time, 1:09. 

One milo and a sixteenth — Kenova won, Sisquoc sec- 
ond, Spindle third. Time, 1:49}. 

Fivo and one-half furlongs — Sea Queen won, Sir 
Dougall second, Midlove third. Time, 1:08}. 

Fivo furlongs — Commuter won, Limb of tho Law 
second, Phil Brensen third. Time, 1:04. 

Threo furlongs — Honest John won, Pat Tucker sec- 
ond, Nettie B. third. Tirne, 0:34ij. 

The Monadnock Handicapat Hawthorne Park, Chi- 
cago, was won by Cambrian on Saturday last at 10 to 

I. Knight took him right to the front and set the 
pace most of the way. Ad vanco Guard came in the 
stretch, but Cambrian finished with remarkable game- 
ness, winning by half a length. A length away from 
Advance Guard came Louisville, John Bright and I'he 
Conqueror, all heads apart. 



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Every bottle of Caustic balsam sold is Wnrrnn 
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directions for ite.use. Send for descriptive ciroulur*. 
testimonials, eta, Address 

tHE LAWRENCE-WILLIAMS CO., Cleveland, Ohl** 



4 



[August 3, 1901 



brown mare Isobel by McKinney out of Cricket 2:10, 
is a very promising filly. The day's summaries are as 
follows: 
Against time to beat 3.31. 

Iloilo, b g by Welcome, dam by Nutwood Wilkes (Simpson) 1 

Time— 2:29H. 

Isobel, br m by Mi'Kinney, dam Cricket 2:10 (Simpson) 1 

Time-2:29j< 

Speedway Stakes, members of Golden Gate Driving Club, three 
in live. 

Steve S. by Steve Whipple (S , w /? et ! ! A i 

Belle Hansen (Miller) • > » 

Denny Healey (Cuicello) 2 3 3 

Time-2:23K, 2:25*4, 2:2454. 
Joe Bonney and Imp distanced. 

2:13 class, pacing, purse *1000. _ .*.«'. 

El Diablo, ch g bv Diablo (Farrar) 1111 

Margaretta, blk m by Direct (Lafferty) 1 5 4 .1 

John A (Austin) 4 3 2 2 

Doc Wilkes (Brown 111 

King Cadenza (Dunlap) 5 4 a 4 

Time— 2:\2H, 2;12m, 2:1554, 2:17. 

2:23 class, trotting, half mile heats. 

Solo, b m by McKinney (Bunch 1 1 1 

Peter Jackson (De Poister 8 4 3 

Ouiboul (Clark) » S 4 

Almonado (Delaney) a 2 2 

Meulo Belle (Richards) 4 d 

Time— 1:10, 1:08X. 1:09. 

THIRD DAY. 

Thursday, August 1.— This was an off day at the 
Breeders meeting, a rather indifferent program offer- 
ing but little inducement for the people to turn out in 
large numbers. However the races carded for Friday 
and Saturday, when excursions will be run on all the 
roads leading into Sacramento, should serve to draw 
out a big attendance. 

The first race to-day was for members of the Golden 
Gate Park Driving Club ana was won by H. W. Moek's 
mare Cricri, a daughter of Direct 2:05£ and Cricket 
2:10 by Steinway. Cricri is the third of Cricket's foals 
to enter the standard list and she now has to her credit 
William Harold 2:13}, Cricri 2:20 and the three year 
old Isobel 2:29]. Theso three are by Sidney, Direct 
and McKinney respectively. 

The race for horses owned by members of the Sacra- 
mento Driving Club was won in staaight heats by 
ReginaF. driven by Mr. Upson and the mare's record 
was reduced to 2:29}. Mr. Bell landed Pansy second 
and Mr. Ruhstaller was third with Monroe Jr. 

The 2:35 pace was the first race of the week to have 

a bad look, but the judges Messrs. E. P. Heald, A. G, 

Gurnett and William G. Layng, promptly substituted 

drivers for those who seemed to have little ambition to 

ride in front and a pretty good race was made of it. 

The event was won by Penrose after Miramonto and 

Deacon had each taken a heat. The summaries of the 

days races are as follows: 

San Francisco Stake— Members G. G. P. Driving Club. Trotting 
and pacing. 

Cricri, b m bv Direct-Cricket 2:10 (Simpson) 1 1 1 

Puerto Rico, b g by Sable Wilkes (Cuicello) 2 2 3 

Holliver.bg (Patrick) 3 8 2 

Tirado, b g by Azmoor J ■ 

I'yrene, br m by Guide ■ (1 

Time-2:21?£. 2:20, 2:2354. 

Sacramento Driving Club Race— Trotting and pacing. 

ReginaF (Upson) 1 1 1 

Pansy (Bell) 2 2 3 

Monroe Jr (Ruhstaller) 6 4 2 

Candy Joe (Trust) 3 S 4 

Baby Button (Wright) 5 3 6 

Peo (Paine) 4 6 5 

Time— 2:195i> 2:21*£, 2:21. 

Pacing, 2:35 class, purse $2110. 

Penrose, b g by Falrose-by Brigadier (Masten 

and Hogoboom) 4 2 111 

Mira Monte, bm by Diablo ..(Brown and Donathan) 1 3 2 2 2 

Deacon, brg (Smith) 5 13 3 3 

Convict (Brown) 2 4 4 d 

Polkadot (Tryon) 3 5 d 

Tlme-2:24»i, 2:23!/!, 2:25, 2:21 H, 2:33. 



First Winners on the Circuit. 



News From the North. 



The County Fair. 

I want to see the apples all 

A-shining in a row, 
I want to see the pumpkins anil 

Their cherry golden glow, 
I'm longing for the fragrant aisles 

Of good old home-made cake, 
And jars and jars of sweet things just 

Like mother used to make. 
And tho' you think me flighty and 

Perhaps a little slow, 
I'm longing for the county fair 

Of twenty years ago. 

For every one you ever knew, 

And lots besides were there, 
The aisles were strewn with sawdust and 

The sunshine tilled the air. 
It smelled just like a circus and 

A Held of new mown hay, 
With happiness enough for all 

And chunks to give away. 
Perhaps I ain't progressing much. 

But anyway I know 
I'm longing for the county fair 

Of twenty years ago. 

I'd like to seo the hoss trot start, 

And watch the belles and beaux: 
In buggies 'long the home stretch fence, 

All in their Sunday clothes: 
While farmer boys in high wheel gigs 

Were yellin' for the "go." 
Yes. I'm longing for the county fair 

Of twenty years ago: 

— H. W. A in American Sportsman . 



The winners of tho two $1000 stakes decided at Sac- 
ramento last Tuesday, the first day of the Breeders 
meeting, Sir Albert S. 2:1U, winner of the 2:25 pace, 
and What Is It 2:1b}, winner of the 2:40 trot, are 
exemplifies of the old saying "blood will tell." The 
breeding of Sir Albert S. is here given tabulated to 
tho third generation: 



I Chas. Derby 2:20. 



Diablo 2:09^. 



Eftle Logan. 



/Durfee 11256. 
I Ri 



tipple . 



f Steinway fettM 
I Kate G. by Electioneer 
(Alcantara 2:23 
(Barcena by Bayard 
| Kaiser 22(10 
(Julie by Revenue 
(Prompter 2305 
(Grace by Buccaneer 



Those who saw Sir Albert S. in his first start were 
impressed with the conviction that his perfect manners, 
wonderfully level head, frictionloss gait and great speed 
as shown in the race, will land him before the year is 
ended several seconds below the 2:10 mark. Sir Albert 
S. was bred by Mr. William G. Layng of this city, who 
still owns him. His sire is the unbeaten Diablo 2:09} 
and his dam is Eftie Logan, a mare bred by the late 
Dr. Hicks of Sacramento. She was sired by Durfee 
11256, a son of Kaiser 2200, the horse that sired the 
dam of Coney 2:02. Effie Logan's dam was Ripple, 
full sister to Creole 2:15 (sire of Javelin 2:08}) by 
Prompter, and Ripple's dam is Grace (dam of Daeda- 
lion 2:11 and Creole 2:15) by Buccaneer. The dam of 
Grace is the famous old mare Mary by Flaxtail, the 
only mare that has two daughters that have each pro- 
duced two 2:15 performers. Just scan the tabulation 
abovoand note the speed producers in it. 

What Is It, winner of the 2:40 trot and the first 
green trotter to take a record on the circuit this yean 
is a half brother to that other queerly named but very 
fast horse Who Is It 2:10j. 

( Dictator 

(Dolly by Mamb Chief 
[ Echo 462 



I Director 2:1 



Direct 2:05!/,. 



Lassie Jean . 



Echora 2:23! J 



Brigadier 2:21 \ 



Lexington Belle 



I Young Mare by- 
Jack Hawkins 

Happy Medium 400 

Lady Turner by 

Frank Pierce 

j Lexington 

( Eagless by Glencoe 



What Is It is by Direct 2:05i out of Lassie Jean (dam 
of Who Is It 2:10}, What Is It 2:16} and Dolly Mar- 
chutz 2:19}) by Brigadier. The dam of Lassie Jean 
was the famous old thoroughbred mare Lexington 
Belle, whose dam was Eagless, whose blood is in the 
veins of many fast trotters and pacers a? well as a 
host of thoroughbreds, including the mighty Morello 
and others. What Is It was bred by Mr. A. G. Gur- 
nett, at the Sulphur Spring Stock Farm, Contra Costa 
county, who still owns him. 



Blue Grass Notes. 



[Kentucky Stock Farm.] 

Seventy-five thousand tickets are Oeing printed for 
the fall trots. They are in fourteen stylos and average 
four colors each. Thirty thousand single admission 
tickets are being made for the day of The Abbot and 
Boralma match race. 

Charles Marvin shipped only one of his string to 
Cleveland, Captor, brown gelding by Electric Bell, 
dam Ula Lee by Gen. George H. Thomas. This horse 
trotted two heats over the Lexington track one day 
last week, the first in 2:12} and tho second in 2:12. 

C. W. Williams says that not a mare will be farmed 
by him, or bred on shares, to any of his stallions next 
season, that is not standard bred and registered. He 
says that the man who has mares that can be regis- 
tered and are not is not wise, and the man who has 
mares that cannot be registered is at least foolish. 

The handsome silver cup to be presented to the win- 
ner of the Walnut Hall Cup has arrived from Now 
York, and Secretary Horace Wilson has had it depos- 
ited in a safety vault, whore it will remain until he is 
ready to exhibit it to the public gaze next fall. The 
cup is added with each season's renewal of the race by 
the proprietor of the Walnut Hall Stock Farm. 

Sellars, the green four-year-old gelding that W. W. 
Kvans sold to Idle Hour Stock Farm, Macon, Ga., last 
fall for a long price, fell and broke his neck while Roy 
Miller was working a fast heat at Grosse Pointo track, 
Detroit, several days ago. Sellars was one of the fast- 
est three year-old trotters ever trained at the Lexing- 
ton track, and as a three-year-old trotted a mile in 
2:12^, and in a heat prior to the accident he worked a 
mile in 2:13}. He was a son of Mincemeat, and was 
valued at $10,000. 

One of the best young things at the Lexington track 
is a three-year-old called Talkur, the property of Major 
P. P. Johnston. The colt is by King Clay, out of 
Lady Athol, by Glen Athol 2:24A. He has been in 
Will Young's hands but thirty days, and has shown 
him a mile in 2:24, last half in 1:09. He is a clean- 
gaited fellow, and is looked upon as one of the best for 
his years at the track. 



[Portland Rural Spirit.] 

Sam Casto has driven Altacora. a full sister to Che- 
halis, a mile in 2:18, last half in 1:07. 

"Red" Green took Boy S. to tho fair grounds where 
ho will train him for the slow class. 

John Pender will move to the State fair grounds 
track next wook with Capt. Jones and Lady Jones. 

Lady Alfred 2:20 by Alfred G., dam Lady Salisbury 
by Mambrino Patchen 58, has been bred to Zombro. 

I. C. Mosher drove his two year old filly Dix Aleno a 
full milo in 2:425, quarter in 38 seconds and last eighth 
in 1 7 A seconds. 

The track at the fair grounds is in the best condi- 
tion possible and no one certainly has a kick coming, 
unless it is against himself. 

E. C. Payne, of Davenport, Wash., is working Klam- 
ath Maid, a green pacer owned by Mr. Ashley, and an 
Alexis colt out of a mare by Ham, also the stallion 
Sunrise 2:19}, who has just closed a successful season 
in the stud. The two last named are owned by A. W. 
Turner. Little Billy has boon turned out and' will not 
bo raced this year. 

R. Everding, of this city, has brought the trotting 
golding Hamrock 2:17} and will place him in John 
Green's hands, who will condition him for the races 
this fall. Mr. Green leaves this week for the fair 
grounds with him and Wm. Frazier's horse Roy S., 
where he will give them the finishing touches. They 
will most likely start at Spokane then return to the 
State Fair. 

The Spokane Inter-Stato Fair raco track at the new 
grounds of tho association is now complete and is now 
pronounced by all who have seen it to bo one of the 
finest, if not the very finost one-half mile tracks in 
America. It is built on exactly the proper lines, will 
make a fine training track and' will yet be speedy. 
The stables are 12 x 12 with a 12-foot shelter attach- 
ment, and the city water system throughout the 
grounds is being put in at a cost of $2000. Tho fencing 
around the track will be of heavy wire construction of 
a pattern sufficiently close to keep out dogs. Ten 
thousand dollars in purses to cover nine days' racing 
is bringing tho results which would naturally be ex- 
pected. 

Tho Brighton Cup, a weight-for-age race at two 
miles and a quarter, was run at Brighton Beach last 
Saturday. It was not the feature of the day's sport 
as had been expected, however, as Prince of Melbourne 
and Rochester were the only two to face tho starter, 
and it amounted to a practical walkover for Prince of 
Melbourne. All the eligibles for the cup wore broken 
down or temporarily retired, so that the race was a 
disappointment. Previous to the day's racing both 
horses were sold at auction, G. Walbaum paying 
$20,500 for Frince of Melbourne and R. R. Rice, owner 
of Wax Taper, $2600 for Rochester. Prince of Mel- 
bourne was naturally at a prohibitive price in tho bet- 
ting, being quoted at 1 to 20, while Rochester was 12 
to 1. Shaw took Prince of Melbourne to the front at 
the start and led by six lengths going by the stand the 
first time, but rounding the first turn his mount bolted 
and before Shaw could stop him McCue had Rochester 
eight lengths in front. Those who had taken a 
" piker's" chance on Rochester cheered as he showed 
the way for tho first mile. Shaw made up his ground 
gradually, however, and, taking command in the be- 
ginning of the last mile, romped home an easy winner 
in the slow time of 4:03 3-5. The stake was worth 
$5795 to the winner. 



VETERINARY DEPARTMENT. 

CONDUCTED BY 

WM. F. EGAN. M. R. C. V. C, F. E. V. M. S. 

Subscribers to this paper can have advice through these columns 
in all cases of sick or iujured horses, cattle or dogs by sending a 
plain description of the case. Applicants will send their name 
and address that they may be identified. 

A mare which I have been driving 14 miles a day 
was perfectly well on Saturday, but on Monday, after 
standing one day, did not exhibit her usual life. When 
she reached town, after a seven mile drive, her hind 
quarters and tail were trembling violently. We were 
unable to find any tenderness over the back. She had 
shown some signs of weakness that day in her hind 
legs. Upon driving homo that afternoon, she showed 
much spirit at first but soon came down to a walk and 
every attempt to urge or if the buggy pushed her a 
little on a grade she showed a tendency to lope and 
hobble. She was hardly able to get into the stable. 
She was given a rest for a few days, placed on bran, 
mashes and nitre. She had been eating fresh barley- 
hay for a few days previously. When led out the next 
day she was quite playful. After several days rest she 
started out well, but on the home trip exhibited the 
same symptoms again. The hostler says that the 
bowels and kidneys are acting normally. This morn- 
ing the mare was very gay in the stablo but exhibited 
the same trouble in the hind quarters. 
July 12, 1901. Albert B. McKee. 

Answer — The symptoms you describe are those of 
azoturia. This usually affects a horse that is fat about 
the kidneys, especially if he be well fed and not worked 
regularly and after a day or two of rest. 

The symptoms do not show until tho horse is exer- 
cised, but the stiffness in hind quarters, trembling, 
swoating, dark colored urine, etc., are manifested. If 
the symptoms be severe there is danger of paraplegia 
and oven death. You had better call in a veterinary 
surgeon to examine the extent of the disease and pre- 
scribe. Hot applications over the kidneys, medicine 
to cause absorption of the uric acid in the system and 
to act on the kidneys and bowels, at the same time 
rest and non-nitrogenous food with a plentiful supply 
of drinking water is the general line of treatment. 



August 3, 1901] 



13 



LOW 

Summer Excursion 
Rates East 

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offers those low round trip rates : 

ON SALE ROUND TRIP 

August 20=21 Louisville, $77.50 

August 22=24 ) Buffa , 87 00 
September 5=6 s 

September 5-6 Cleveland, 82.50 

These rates apply from California main-line 
points. Many miles shortest— many hours fastest- 
finest scenery— choice of routes— limited trains— 
personally conducted tourist excursions— 

ACROSS THE CONTINENT 

Details at the nearest office 

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on a mare for which I have since been offered $800. 
I would not be without it if it cost (6.00 a bottle." 
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An Overstocked Farm. 




WEBSTER'S INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY 



NE.W EDITION JUST ISSUED 

NEW PLATES THROUGHOUT 
Now Added 25,000 NEW WORDS, Phrases, Etc. 
Rich Bindings * 2364 Pages 5000 Illustrations 

Prepared under the supervision of W. T. Harris, Ph.D., LL.D., United States 
Commissioner of Education, assisted by a large corps of competent specialists. 

BETTER. THAN EVER FOR HOME. SCHOOL. AND OFFICE,.' 

V* / Also Webster's Collegiate Dictionary with Scottish Glossary,, etc. 
l( Fi rs t class in quality, second class in size. " Nicholas Murray Butler 



Specimen pages, etc., of both books sent on application. 

G. & C. MERRIAM CO., Publishers, Springfield, NLss., U. S. A. 




An overstocked farm is an unprofitable 
one, nine time out of ten. The farmer 
who ia carrying more hogs than he can 
properly take care of, is in a fair way to 
lose money. There is no stock in which 
an oversupply results in loss quicker than 
sheep and swine. It does not do to crowd 
them. At a farm recently there were 150 
pigs of all ages, sizes and sexes running 
in a single lot, all of them thin, hungry 
and squealing. This was not a profitable 
condition for them to be in. They were 
not in shape to add growth and gain from 
the feed they were receiving. 

It is safe to say that had the farmer only 
fifty head of hogs, and they were divided 
into even sizes and ages and fed well, get- 
ting them into good cond tion, that the 
profits on the fiftv would be more than 
on the 160. 

Overstocking is the bane of many an 
enthusiastic farmer, who is of the opinion 
that profits are multiplied according to 
the number kept regardless of condition. 

The secretary of the Wyoming sheep 
ominission says that the lamb crop this 
-eason was the heaviest ever known. In 
ome herds of two and three thousand the 
iverage per cent was 112 and 113. The 
anges are in splendid condition and the 
tate over the lamb crop averages ninety- 
I ive per cent. 



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Los Angeles Race Meeting! 

DISTRICT AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION No. 6. 

Sept. 28th to Oct. 12th, inclusive. 

The following Running Stakes will close August 17. 1901. 

M A 1 I ac Anrmlnf PWhir For Three Year Olds. Entrance »10. $30addi- 
INO. 1 LOS AllgeieS UerDy. tiona i to start; a cup and $400 added, of which $60 to 

second and $40 to third. Colts to carry 122 pounds, geldings 119 pounds, fillies 117 pounds. To be run 

Saturday, September 28th. One and one-fourth miles. 

M„ 7 Innalhan flub Qtnkpc For Two Year Olds. Entrance »5. $15 addi- 
llO. L JOndlFldll L-IUD OlaKCS. tionai to start; $225 added, of which $50 to second 

and $25 to third. Weights 115 pounds. Maidens allowed Ave pounds. To be run Monday. September 

30th. Five furlongs. 

Ma 2 TUa Dnco Cial/o For T » ree Year Olds and upwards. For non-winners 

1>I0. O I lie KUae OiahC. of a race ( at tne time of closing) of more than $50 in value 

this year, 1901. Entrance »5. $15 additional to start; $250 added, of which $50 to second and $25 to 
third. Weights for age. Maidens allowed Ave pounds. To be run Tuesday, October 1st. One mile. 

Ma 4 C nn ;c4rnnri HoniKr'n For All Ages. Entrance S5. $15 additional to 
NO. 4 LapiSiranO nanaiCap. Btart . 1005 added, of which $50 to second and $25 to 

thjrd. Weights to be posted two days prior to the race. For horses owned south of Tehachipi. To 

be run Wednesday October 2d. One mile and fifty yards. 

Ma C Tho I \tnrU C«aL-PC r ° r Three Year Olds and upwards Entranc 6 

NO. I Re LynCn OiaKeS. S5 , $20 additional to start; $25" added, of which $50 t" 

second and $25 to third. Three year olds to carry 102 pounds, four year olds 1 10 pounds, Ave year olds 
and upwards 113 pounds. Winners at this meeting to carry five pounds extra. Beaton non-winners, 
at this meeting, allowed five pounds, maidens ten pounds To be run Thursday, October 3d. One mile. 

No. 6— The Hollenbeck Hotel Handicap. %%' ?MSo£\* sSrS"™ 

silver cup presented by A. C. Bilicke, Esq.. with $225 added, of which $50 to second and $25 to third. 
Weights to be posted two days prior to the race. To be run Friday, October 4th. Six furlongs. 

No. 7— Southern California Handicap. *°^& t £?c. •* $*;" ,1' 

tionai to start; $250 added, of which $50 to second and $25 to third. Weights to bo posted two days 
prior to the race. For horses owned south of Tehachipi. To bo run Saturday, October 5th. One and 
one-sixteenth miles. 

Ma C l„„,|;„„ HanAiran For Mares of AH Ages. Entrance $20addi- 
I>0. O Angelina liailUltap. tionai to start; $250 added, of which $50 to second and 

$25 to third. Weights to be posted two days prior to the race. To be run Monday, October 7th. One 

mile and fifty yards. 

No. 9— The Sea Breeze Hurdle Handicap. ^' r ^Z:^, ' t ,!Z 

dltional to start; $225 added, of which $35 to second and $15 to third. Weights to be posted two days 
prior to the race. (There will also be an extra race given for .lumpers). To be run Tuesday, October 
8th. One and one-fourth miles. 

Ma IA n~A..s»A Roll HnndiVnn For Throe Year old liHics Entrance »/> 

nO. IU — Urange Dell llallUitap. $20 additional to start; 8850 added, of which $50 
to second and $25 to third. Weights to be posted two days prior to the race. To bo run Wednesday, 
October 9th. One mile. 

M II C*.4n inUn Cial/ac For Three Year Olds and upwards. Entrance 

NO. II Oama Amid OlahCS. $15 additional to start; $250 added, of which 

$50 to seoond and $25 to third. Non-winners of this year allowed flvo pounds. Maidens, if throo years 
old, five pounds; four years old, eight pounds additional. To be run Thursday, October 10th. Seven 
furlongs. 

Ma it \\!~7. r i.4 HnndiVon For Three 1 ear Olds and upwards Kntranee W.V 

NO. \L VVNgni rianilltdp. $20 additional to start; BOO a id, of whloh $50 to seo- 

ond and $25 to third. Weights to be posted September 28th. Winners after weights published, five 
pounds extra. To be run Friday, October 11th. Two miles. 

No. 13— Hotel Van Nuys Handicap. K.fX S» P S 

by Milo M. Potter, Esq., with $300 added, of which $50 to second and $25 to third. Weights to be 
posted two days prior to race. To be run Saturday, October 12th. One and one-sixteenth miles. 

For Conditions, see Entry Blanks. 



E. T. WRIGHT, President. 



FREEMAN G. TEED, Secretary. 



CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR FOR 1901. 
SACRAMENTO 

SEPTEMBER 2nd TO 14th, INCLUSIVE. 

ENTRIES TO CLOSE SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1901. 

All Races to be contested at the State Fair on days to be here- 
after designated by the Board of Directors. 



Flash Stake. 



The following Running Stakes will close August 3, 1901, with the Secretary. 
Remainder of Running Program, for which Liberal Pur§es will be given, will be 
announced September 1st, anil will provide for four or more Running Races each day : 

For All Ages. Entrance SIO, to accompany nomination; $20 addi- 
tional for horses not declared by 4 P. II. the day preceding the race: $400 
added by the Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third. Non-winners of three races this year, If 
three year olds and over, flvo pounds; non-winners of two races, seven pounds; and non-winners of one 
race, ten pounds. Maidens, three years old allowed five pounds; four years old and over, seven pounds 
additional. Six Furlongs. 

Thp ^hnffpt* 'spllinir ^ffllfP For Two Year Olds. Entrance »10, to accom- 
Olianci owning Oiarvc. pany nomination; $15 additional for colts not de- 
clared by 4 P. M. day preceding race; with $3011 added by the Society, of which $51) to second and $25 to 
third. Horses may bo entered not to be sold, and carry rule weight. If entered to be sold for $1000, 
allowed three pounds; $700, six pounds; $400, ten pounds. Winners of ono race after closing of stake to 
carry three pounds extra; of two or more, seven pounds extra. Maidens beaten three times, allowed 
five pounds; four or more, seven pounds. Value to be placed on starters through entry box by 4 p. m. 
day before race. Six Furlongs. 

Sacramento State Fair Selling Stake. I^^J&2f ".5t25: 

pany nomination; $20 additional for horses not declared by 4 p. K. the day preceding tho race: $400 
added by the Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third. Winner to be sold at auction. If for 
$2000 to carry rule weight; if for less, one pound allowed on each $100 to $1000, thenco two pounds for 
each $100 to $400. Selling price to bo placed on starters through entry box by 4 p. m. on the day pre- 
ceding the race. A winner of a stake race or three or more races of any value after closing of stake, 
to carry five pounds extra. Maidens allowed seven pounds. Ono Mile. 

Thp Vilirfnr ^taUp K " r Tnl **"' Olds and upwards Futrance #10, to 

■ lit t iimui OWM. accompany nomination; $20 additional for horses not declared by 
4 p. If. day preceding race; with $400 added by tho Society, of which $70 to second and $30 to third. 
Stake to be named after winner if Vinctor's time (1:40) is beaten. A non-winner of a stake race in 
1901, or a race of the value of $500, allowed, if a non-winner of live races other than soiling races, flvo 
pounds. Maidens seven pounds additional. Ono mile. 

For Two Year Old lilUe* Futrance Win, to accompany 
nomination; $15 additional if not declared by I p. m. tho day pre- 
ceding the race; $:«ki added by the Society, of which $50 to second and $25 to third. Weights Ave 
pounds below tho scale. A winner of a stake raco in I0O1, or a winnerof three or more races of any 
value, other than selling races, flvo pounds oxtra. Non-winnors of two races allowed four pounds. 
Maidens allowed seven pounds, and if such are the produce of a mare that has not produced a winner 
at the time of starting, ten pounds. Maidens beaten threo or more times since closing of tho stake, 
allowed Ave pounds, and if not placed second or third, seven pounds additional. Five furlongs. 

A Handicap for Three Year Old. and upward*. 
Entrance #10, to accompany nomination, with $20 addi- 
tional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. day preceding race; with $H«i added by the Society, of which 
$70 to second and $30 to third. Weights posted at 12 M. day preceding race. A winner of a race other 
than a selling race, aftor tho weights are published, to carry flvo pounds extra. Ono milo and a 
furlong. 

The California State Fair Annual Stake. &£rfiS&£? SuZ toSS 

company nomination; $20 additional for horses not declared by 4 P. M. tho day preceding the race; 
with $500 added by the Society, of which $100 to second and $50 to third. Weights posted by 12 M. day 
preceding race. A winnerof a race, other than a selling raco, after the weights are published, to 
carry Ave pounds extra. Six furlongs. 

Thp PrPciflpnt'« 'stflkp x Handicap for Three Year OIiIh anil Upwards. 
riMiuwiia oianv-. Em. ane<. m I r.. to accompany nomination; with $25 addi- 
tional for horses not declared by 4 p. m. day preceding race; $5tX) added by tho Society, of which $lt)n 
to second and $50 to third. Weights posted by 12 If, day before raco. A winnerof a race other than a 
selling purse, after tho weights are published, to carry Avo pounds oxtra. Ono and one-quarter miles. 

The Stato Agricultural Society's rules to govern exoept whoro conditions are otherwise. All 
declarations and claims for allowances duo at 4 p. M. day preceding race, unless otherwise specified 
in conditions. Owners and trainers will be held responsible for samo. Entrance and declaration 
money to go to winner. No added money for less than four starters in different interests. In selling 
races, beaten horses not liable to claim. Right to use starting gate Is reserved. 

Entries must state name, color, sex and pedigree of tho horse, with racing colors of tho owner. 



Sunny Slope Stake. 



The Governor's Stake. 



GEO. W. JACKSON, Secretary California State 
Agricultural Society, Sacramento, Cal. 



A. B. SPRECKKLS, President. 



10 



[August 3, 1901 



gun the Indian with us was carrying. If he lived he s 
got the whole collection with him now and would be 
worth working as a mineral claim, and if he's dead he 
shares the distinction of Moses, for his grave no man 
knoweth unto this day. 

"Jack rabbits and quail don't count much as same, 
but the country down there is so full of them you have 
to kill a few as you go along the road just in self-defence. 
We never thought of using anything but a six-shooter 
to kill rabbits with, for they would come up and in ves- 
tigate our outfit at twenty yards any hour in the day. 
The quail are the blue California sort, the males with 
the handsome brown crest. They wero so thick that 
we used to kill them with sticks around camp when we 
wanted any of them to broil. 

"Antelopes we saw from the wagon almost every 
day, and when I say that you can pot antelopes at 300 
yards without even taking the trouble to get the wind 
of them, vou will see that they are tamer than you 
ever find them in this part of the country. 

"But nothing in the game held a bobtail flush along- 
side the bighorn. I had not thought of looking for 
(hem in that part of the country till I saw several 
pairs of magnificent horns knocking around on the 
rubbish heaps near some of the little Papago settle- 
ments we passed. Then my bristles were up, and I 
asked the Indians where the horns came from. They 
said very indifferently that they had killed the sheep 
around in the hills. I knew the sort of guns they had, 
old '73 model Winchesters, tied together with rawhide 
and strings, and I was puzzled to see how they got 
anything as shy as a bighorn with such an armament. 
One of the Mexican ranchers I stopped with told me 
that the Papagos were groat hunters, but they made 
a specialty of never shooting at anything over seventy- 
five yards, for fear of wasting a cartridge, which costs 
5 cents in silver in that part of the country. Bighorns 
at seventy-five yards sounded like a mescal vision, but 
I nominated myself for a pair of horns right there. 
About a week later I got two pairs. 

"Around Hermosillo, the State capital, they said 
that you were liable to find bighorn in any of the 
mountains over to the west. But when we had trav- 
eled fifty miles down toward the coast the Papagos 
told us that the place where the bighorn really lived 
and held mass meetings was a desolate range of mount- 
ains right down on the edge of the Gulf of California. 
The Papagos said they never hunted over in those 
hills themselves, because the Seri Indians came in there 
off and on to hunt, and Seris were several degrees 
worse than large, black devils; that they ate confiding 
strangers, know nothing of guns, used poisonous ar- 
rows and could run down a deer on foot. If we went 
over into the Big Seri mountains, wo would find big- 
horn without hunting for them, but the Seris would 
kill us. However, that was our business, if we wanted 
to be killed. 

"Wo elected to be killed and cut off across forty 
miles of desert, cactus jungle, scrub and mesquite, and 
stretches of open plays where the sand was hard and 
bare as asphalt, and old, forgotten river deltas where 
the sand was like powdery gray volcanic ash, and the 
squirrel burrows let the horses in to their knees every 
six steps. Talk about dead and forgotten territory! 
That gulf coast desert takes the unleavened biscuit. 
Even tho coyotes keep out of there, and the only liv- 
ing things we saw on the way across were tarantulas 
and Gila monsters, that would stalk right up under 
your feet as if they expected you to turn out and give 
them the road. 

"We finally hit a big barranca full of water at the 
foot of the coast range of hills, and tho next day we 
went over to climb a 5000-foot peak that rose right up 
out of the gulf, so as to get a look at the country before 
beginning to hunt, likewise thinking there might be 
metal in a big pink and yellow outcrop that showed 
near the top of the peak. We had bribed a couple of 
Papagos to come along with us, and they steered us up 
to an intermittent spring at the foot of the peak, 
where they said there was water, sometimes. There 
wasn't any water, but just as we got to where the 
spring ought to be, one of the Indians jabborod to the 
other and held ui) three fingers. 

"I looked ahead, and there was a band of throe big- 
horns too far away for a shot, just disappearing over a 
saddle between the peaks. I wanted to work around 
about two miles and catch them on the other side, but 
the Indian said in Spanish that it was too much work, 
to just keep on where we were going and 'we'd see some 
more right away, pretty quick.' I figured he was lying 
to get out of the walk, but we followed his advice. 
We climbed pretty much all the rest of the forenoon 
till we were within about 500 feet of the top of the 
peak, when tho Papagos came to a point again and 
dropped behind a rock. There, at a forty-five -degree 
angle above us, and about 300 yards away, there was a 
bunch of four sheep lined up against a straight wall of 
rock, dun-colored tufa, just about the same color they 
were. The only thing that located them for me was 
tho head and shoulders of the older leader sticking out 
beyond the corner of the cliff and showing black 
against the blue sky. The Indians were for creeping 
up till you could knock the whole lot over with a rock, 
but I'd worked too often a whole day for a shot at 800 
yards to take any chances in getting closer. So I took 
a rest and dreiv coarse on the leader's head, allowing 
far the refraction on the rocks. He just went up in 
the air as if he had dynamite under him and came 
down all spread out on the slide rock, and tobogganed 
down to within a hundred yards of us like a wild-cat 
train on a grade. 

"Do you know the rest of those fool sheep didn't 
tumble to what had happened till I had taken a snap 
shot at the next in the line? I knew I had touched 
him from tho way he stumbled, but they all went up 
the rock like cats. It was just pure waste of ammuni- 
tion to shoot again, but I couldn't help pumping one 
more shot at them just as they were getting out of 
sight behind the shoulder of the mountain. Scratch 
me if the smallest ono of the bunch didn't curl up in 
the midst of a jump and came down flat. It wasn't 
shooting. It was just Irish luck. I found afterward 
I had caught him in the back of the head, just between 
the horns. 

"The other two were evidently making right for the 



tip of the peak and wo went after them, hoping to find 
the one I had winged. We climbed half a hour on that 
last 500 feet, following a little blood on the rocks. 
Right at tho top of the peak thero were two big 
knuckles of basalt, the hightest about thirty feet 
above the other tumbled mess of rock that finished off 
the crown ot the mountain. Right at its foot was a 
little gravel patch, and as I came crawling over the 
smaller knuckle, I saw my bighorn lying down on that 
little clearing just below me. He was up like a shot 
and went at tho pinnacle rock like a steeplechaser. 
He found a footing on it somehow, and about three 
jumps put him on top. I knew I had him caged for 
the only way out was over the mountain I was on and 
the mountain dropped away a clear thousand feet on 
the other side. I had bored him right through the 
body, but too far back, and he> was dripping blood 
from the mouth. The last rush up the rock had weak- 
ened him and he was shaking at the knees, but he 
gathered his hoofs up in a bunch and sailed right out 
into the air away from mo. I spent fifteen minutes and 
risked my neck climbing around the mountain to see if 
there was any landing place on the other side, but it 
went down, as I say, a thousand feet clear. It was the 
plainest case of suicide I ever saw in an animal." 



Black bass fishing near Guerneville and Camp Rev- 
erie is better than it has been for many years past. 



ROD. 



m m 

Coming Events. 



July 1— Striped bass season opened. 
July 1— Black bass season opened. 
Aug. 10— Saturday Contest No. P. 
2:30 r. m. 



Class series. Stow lake 



Aug. 11— Sunday Contest No 9. Class series. Stow lake, 10a. m 



The Fly- Casters. 

As the class contosts in fly-easting at Stow Lake are 
narrowing down to the finals in the medal contests, it 
will be noticed that the interest of tho club members 
is unflagging and to the observer who keeps pace with 
the results it will bo seen that the average of improve- 
ment is over on tho increase. The Saturday attend- 
ance has been rogular, but not equal in numbers to the 
workers who turn out with their rods on Sunday morn- 
ings — this fact is a reasonable condition of affairs and 
not due to want of interest as much as lack of oppor- 
tunity. In long distance casting a number of the fly- 
casters have shown a wonderful improvement; on Sat- 
urday last out of eight contestants all but one put his 
line out ovof 100 feet. Of this number we believe Dr. 
Brooks shows the most improvement, comparatively, 
for the season. Of the leaders Harry Golcher and T. 
W. Brotherton have struck a pa3e in both Saturday 
and Sunday work that will require the highest skill to 
overtake. J. B. Kenniff, however, may be reckoned 
with as a dangerous opponent in this particular event. 
In Saturday's scores every rod has a record of over 
8(i°o in the accuracy event. In this event on Sunday, 
out of nineteen men in, but four fell below 87!',, thir- 
teen of the fly-casters made over 90°^. T. W. Brother- 
ton and Ed Everett were high in delicacy and accuracy 
percentages on Saturday and up in the quartette of 
best scores for this event on Sunday — the results in 
delicacy work on Sunday being toned down by adverse 
weather conditions. The bait-casting event is gradu- 
ally winning more students for the class and promises 
to develop some exceptionally skillful work. Since the 
sixth contest a gradual improvement in this particular 
style — and a good one it is to know, too — has been ap- 
parent. The scores for both days of the eighth con- 
test follow: 

-Stow Lake, July 27, 1901. Wind, 



Saturday Contest No. 
stronj-', west. Weather, fogf 

Judges— Messrs. Brooks and Mansfield 
Clerk, Mr. Smyth. 



Referee, Mr. Muller. 



Events 



1 



Battu, H. 



Brotherton, T. W 

Everett, E 

Golcher, H. C... 

Grant, C. F 

Mansfield. W. 
Mocker, E. A 
Muller, H. F 
Smyth, H. .. 



D... . — 











a 


b 


C 




88 


mi 


8-12 


H'.l 


8-12 


81 8-12 


So K-12 


645 


106 


89 




85 




78 4-12 


81 9-12 




183 


98 


4-1:.' 


90 


4-12 


84 2-12 


87 3-12 


93 11 


119 


92 




92 




m s-12 


89 4-12 




130 


98 




91 




77 6-12 


84 3-12 


91 4 


im 


88 


8-12 


88 




75 


81 6-12 






88 




91 




76 K-12 


83 10-12 


843 


105 


86 


4-ia 


:«i 




80 10-12 


85 5 -12 




105 


;il 




86 




79 2-12 


82 7-12 






90 


4-12 


86 


4-12 


79 2-12 


82 St- ia 





Sunday Contest No. 8— Stow Lake, July 28, 1901. Wind, 
southwest. Weather, warm and foggy. 

Judges— Messrs. Turner and Brotherton.. Referee, Mr. Mans- 
field. Clerk, Mr. Smyth. 



Events 



1 



Battu. H 86 



Blade, A. M. 

Brooks, W. E 

Brotherton, T. W 

Everett, E 

Foulks, C. H 

Grant, C. F 

Golcher, H. C 

Haight, F. M 

Heller, S A. 



85 

loo 

113 

IM 

98 
102 
124 

80 

. 90 

Huyck, C 96 



Isenbruck, R 

KennilT, J. B 

Mansfield, W. D 
Muller, H. F ... 
Mocker, E. A . . . 

Reed, F. H 

Smyth. H — 

Turner, J. S — 

Young, C.G 84 



ma 

94 
86 



92 


4-12 


88 


8-12 


75 


82 4-12 


65 14 


68 




73 


4-12 


68 4-12 


70 10-12 




90 


8-12 


93 




64 8-18 


78 7-12 




91 


4-12 


91 


4-12 


75 10-12 


K3 7-12 


91 7 


92 




80 




75 10-12 


82 11-12 




84 


4-12 


73 




74 2-12 


73 7-12 




B3 


4-12 


94 




73 4-12 


83 8-12 


"11 14 


92 


8-12 


87 


4-12 


71 2-12 


80 11-12 


75 11 


84 


4-12 


87 




75 10-12 


HI 5-12 




97 




HK 




73 4-12 


80 8-12 


63 


95 




88 


4- 12 


74 2-12 


80 .3-12 




HI 




86 


8-12 


75 


80 1(1-12, 


94 12 


93 


4-12 


114 


4-12 


78 4-12 


86 4-12 


82 10 


93 


8-12 


SI 


8-12 


80 


80 10-12 




87 


8-12 


ST 




75 10-12 


81 5-12 




90 




88 


4-12 


70 


81 8-12 




89 


8-12 


90 


4-12 


75 10-12 


83 1-12 




94 


8-12 


80 


4-12 


75 


82 8-12 




94 


112 


85 


4-12 


80 


82 8-12 





«S-NOTE: Event 1— Distance Casting, feet. Event 2— Ac- 
curacy percentage. Event 3— Delicacy, (a) accuracy percentage; 
(b) delicacy percentage; (c) net percentage. Event 4— Lure cast- 
ing, percentage. 
The fractions in lure casting are 15ths. 



C. M. Osborn hooked a six and a half pound rainbow 
with a No. Wilson spoon and a six and a half ounce 
rod recently in the Truckeo. Ho was casting from the 
bridge near the Country Club Lodge at Verdi when 
he hooked the record trout for this season. He battled 
with him for nearly three-quarters of an hour, when 
Ed Everett came to the rescue and climbing down the 
bridge cross timbers secured the prize in a net. 

Many anglers are now on the stream from Uoea to 
Verdi, the fishing being first class. 



Striped bass fishermen have been making good 
catches in San Antonio creek. Many bass have been 
caught at Black Point, near the lailroad bridge. Chas. 
Precht caught four fish Sunday near Sears Point, 
weighing respectively 2, 5, 5 and 7.1 pounds. 

On Saturday and Sunday, two weeks ago, Al Wilson 
and Manuel Cross made the high hook catch for this 
season. They fished in tho flats below Pinole, on the 
east side of the bay. In about four or five feet of 
water in the evening and morning next day they 
caught twenty-three fish, the heaviest weighing 19 
pounds. Ono fish, a 7 pounder, was caught on a troll- 
ing spoon. After giving away a number they still had 
100 pounds of fish to bring home. Fred Allen landed 
a 14 pounder on Sunday caught in San Pablo bay. 



The Autobiography of a Salmon. 

My first recollections of this uncertain life are of 
swimming about with a swarm of other -'pinkeens" or 
tiny salmon fry above the shingly bed of a shallow 
stream, which I afterwards learnt was a tributary of 
the Shannon many miles from tho sea. We found our- 
selves suddenly launched into existence without know- 
ing why or wherefore; but it seems from the earliest 
youth the instinct of self preservation was strong 
within us, for we carefully avoided any fish bigger than 
ourselves. 

Many a time do I remember darting about with my 
comrades or poising in a stationary position behind 
some small stone in tho clear water, when what ap- 
peared to us to be a huge monster with great ugly 
mouth and rows of sharp teeth would sweep amongst 
our shoal, and carry off some of my unfortunate com- 
rades. These voracious enemies wore, as I afterwards 
discovered, only small pike and perch; but in those 
days they seemed veritablo giants in comparison with 
ourselves, and whenever the dark form of one ap- 
peared, we used to scatter in all directions, sometimes 
even jumping out of the water in our fright. 

For the above reasons we seldom ventured into the 
deeper portions of the stream, but kept almost entirely 
to tho shallow shingly parts, yet oven here we wero far 
from safe. Often have I seen one of our party sud- 
denly seized by a strong narrow weapon and taken 
clean out of the water never to return. This was tho 
beak of a tall, thin grey bird with long legs and neck, 
which has the power of remaining so motionless that 
it is hard to distinguish it from a stake or a portion of 
the bank. Suddenly it makes a dart with its cruel 
beak and woo betide the unfortunate object of its in- 
tentions, for it seldom misses. 

Avoiding life's dangers from the earliest times and be- 
ing favored with a certain amount of good fortune, by 
the time I was six months old I was well able to take 
care of myself, and was, in my own estimation, at 
least, quite a grown up fish. Such is tho precocious- 
ness of youth, the confidence in self which alone is 
capable of carrying us through the ups and downs, 
disappointments and vicissitudes of existence. At the 
present time, with the ripe experiences of years, I look 
back and admire the splendid impudence of my younger 
days which bore me successfully along where so many 
of my contemporaries perished. 

At what then appeared to me the advanced age of 
six months, I was a well built little fish some four 
inches in length, silver in color, with a black back and 
dark patches on my sides. In a word, I was a well 
developed salmon fry and my ono aim and object in 
life was to make my way down tho river towards the 
sea. 

Though at that time I had no idea as to what the 
sea was like, nor an inkling as to how complete a change 
life in salt water would be, yet I obeyed the overwhelm- 
ing instinct which prompted me to work gradually 
down with tho stream, not knowing whither nor how 
far I was going. 

During this long and protracted journey dangers 
were many and I had numerous narrow escapes. 

In the deep parts of the river, large pike, some of 
which weighed up to 2(1 pounds, with enormous cruel 
jaws, used to chase mo, but luckily I was a fast swim- 
mer and always managed to dart into shallow water 
where my huge pursuers were afraid to follow. Yet 
even in the shallows one was not absolutely safe, for 
largo black birds with yellow beaks used to dive under 
water and chase one at a terrific speed. 

However, I used to avoid them by jinking round a 
stone, when they either went straight ahead and lost 
me or continued their chase after some other fish. 

In the summer evenings when the sun was setting, 
and a gentle breeze played over the surface of the 
warm water, I and my companions used to spend a 
busy hour catching tho flies which drifted down the 
stream or hovered in swarms above it. Of these, 
thero were many varieties; some with fat yellow bodies 
and speckled brown wings, others green and yellow, 
but the most delicious of all were black all over. 

On one calm evening when, after a half hour's feed- 
ing, I was gorged with flies, I made a fatal mistake, 
and nearly paid dearly for my greediness. I rose at 
what appeared to me to be one of my favorite black 



August 3, 1901] 



11 



gnats, when to my surprise and consternation, the 
moment I got it into my mouth it gave me acute pain. 
I made a few frantic dashes to and fro, but found my- 
self being hauled along in spite of all my efforts. 

Just as I was almost exhaused on the top of tho 
water, the fly left my mouth, carrying away a part of 
the flesh, and I drifted away with the stream and 
nearly dead, but free. 

After this experience I rather avoided tho Hies which 
drifted down over my nose, however tempting they 
might be and contented myself with eating the larva' 
off the stones and the sediment in tho water. 

All this time I was increasing in strength and size, 
and was by degrees making my way down the river 
until at last I left the rocky bottom and fresh water 
behind me and got my first taste of tho salt tide. 

Having arrived in tho sea, life changed completely. 
I found plenty of food and grew enormously in size. 
There were even more enemies to be avoided than in 
tho river, and 1 had many narrow escapes. However, 
the stronger I grew the more I was able to look after 
myself and avoid danger. 

After living for about a year in the sea, an irresist- 
able impulse again drove me towards fresh water, and 
before long I found myself with a lot of other fish of 
about my own weight heading towards tho mouth of 
the river. 

I met many of my old comrades the salmon fry of 
the year before, but so much had they grown that 
they were scarcely recognizable. They wore now 
handsome, well formed "peal" varying in weight from 
'.I to 7 lbs, I myself weighing about i lbs. 

It was about the beginning of May when we entered 
the mouth of tho Shannon and left the salt, green 
waves of the Atlantic for the muddy brackish water of 
the river. The change affected both our spirits and 
appetites. Instead of dashing about intent on killing 
anything smaller than ourselves, we became more lazy 
and listless and mouched along the edge of the mud 
flats, with the one set purpose in our minds of getting 
up the river. 

Such, however, is the precarious existence of a 
salmon, that although we had escaped the many perils 
of the ocean, yet we were to be confronted in the tidal 
waters of the river by new and terrible dangers. 

Fortunately being one of the smaller and less im 
portant members of our "Scull of peal," I was content 
to follow my larger comrades. 

What was my horror one day to see several of them 
suddenly fixed in a huge black net which seemed to 
extend across the whole channel and was drifting down 
with the tide. The wi-etched fish had got their heads 
through the meshes of the net, and in trying to force 
their bodies through as well, had got tho sides of tho 
mesh behind their gills and the more they struggled 
the more firmly fixed they became, until at last they 
were lifted above the surface of the water and never 
seen by us again. 

This happened on several occasions, for the net was 
extremely' hard to see, and the leading fish would 
strike it suddenly and become fixed. 

Much disheartened at the sight of so many of my 
companions thus coming to an untimely end, I used to 
retreat wit h tho remainder of the scull and wait until 
some of the bolder spirits among us had found a pass- 
age round tho obstruction. 

Being unfamiliar with the geography of the bed of 
the river, our natural tendency was to feel our way 
along the edges of tho channel. 

Yet here again we were continually being confronted 
with stake nets and other devices for our capture, in 
which many of our number were caught. 

After a journey of some seventy miles the river 
narrowed from a wide expanse of mud flats and deep 
channels to one broad clear sti-eam of fresh water. 

It was about tho middle of June when we passed the 
city of Limerick and made our way through a narrow 
passage in an obstruction which at first sight seemed 
to block the whole width of the river. 

This I subsequently learnt from old fish who had 
passed it for many successive seasons was the famous 
"Lachs Weir," the most formidable of the many 
dangerous obstacles which obstruct the path of un- 
fortunate salmon. 

However on this occasion we managed to pass it 
more by good luck than good management, for we 
were still young and did not realize our danger. 

Once in the clear fresh water life seemed at last to bo 
really worth living, and apparently there was nothing 
more to bo feared. We had the satisfactory feeling of 
duty accomplished, and enjoyed a well earned rest 
after our struggles in tho tideway. 

Some of the more ambitious spirits among us pressed 
on up the river, but most of us were content on reach- 
ing some deep eddying hole to remain there and exist 
through the long summer days, occasionally rising to 
tho surface and lazily rolling on the top of tho water. 

Personally I found a snug corner behind a large 
honey combed rock which appeared to me to bo abso- 
lute paradise. On each side of tho rock tho swift 
stream dashed past forming under its shelter a slight 
back water in which it was possible to maintain 
one's position with a minimum of exertion. 

In tho same eddy dwelt an old salmon, the veteran 
of many an expedition to the sea and back, who had 
alroady been in the river three months, and whoso 
originally silver back and sides were now tinged a 
bright rod from oxposuce to tho sun. 

He was an unsociable old fish and seemed to have 
lost all interest in this life, a picture of brooding con- 
templation as he lay almost motionless from day to 
day. The only advice he gave to me was about the 
folly of inquisitiveness, especially with referenco to the 
occasional gaudy lures which floated over our rock 
and remained poised in the most offensive manner 
above our heads. 

Many a time when one more startling than tho rest 
would appear, my curiosity would bo excited to such a 
pitch that it was only tho restraining Influence of this 
old salmon which prevented me from rising and seizing 
the tantalizing thing in my mouth. 

As for my old friend, ho used to simply cock one eye, 
regard theobject attentively for a second and then re- 
lapse into oblivion again. Often I used to think that 
if he would wax a little more communicative and un- 
fold the history of his life, he could have related more 



than one sad experience, and many a hairbreadth 
escape in waters both salt and fresh. 

A couple of months passed in this tranquility, when 
towards tho ond of September the river became sud- 
denly swollen and muddy after heavy rain. The 
freshness and increased strength of the stream seemed 
to put now life into us all. and roused oven the old 
salmon out of his lethargic state. Fish which had 
been stationary behind the same rocks for months be- 
gan to move about, shake their tails and seek pastures 
new. I too felt this exhilarating influence, and for 
some days while the flood lasted explored my way up 
tho river. 

At the end of October we could hardly have been 
recognized as the same bright, silver, well-formed fish 
which had entered tho mouth of the rivor only a few 
months before. The larger salmon had completely 
changed in appearance, having lost condition and be- 
come long, lanky creatures with hooked noses and 
great ugly jaws. Tho females were big with roe and 
the instinct that ruled us all was that of finding some 
suitable pebbly shallow for spawning operations dur- 
ing the ensuing cold season. 

Thus the winter passed away and tho month of Feb- 
ruary found us idly drifting down towards tho soa, 
shapeless, hideous "slats," devoid of spirits or energy, 
mere shadows of our former selves. So enervated 
were we that we avoided the strong current of tho 
main stream and frequented the easy water and shal- 
lows near the banks. The ono sensation that took 
possession of me was that of hunger, a craving for food 
in order to renew the wasted condition of my system, 
and yet nature provided nothing for us to eat. We 
were far too emaciated and slack to attempt to pursue 
the smaller fish which crossed our paths. 

On reaching the tideway the first tasto of salt water 
acted like a tonic. Our energies seemed to return 
with our renewed silver color; so that by the time we 
had been a few months in the sea we were quite our- 
selves again, strong and fit, with voracious appetites. 

I attached myself to a large "scull" of salmon, most 
of which were considerably bigger than I, and with 
them enjoyed great sport chasing the shoals of sprats 
and herrings with which the ocean abounded. 

In the course of a year my weight had trebled and I 
entered the river again a firm, handsome fish of twelve 
pounds. 

Though no doubt the experiences of the year before 
tended to make us wiser and more cautious in our 
journey up the river, yet many of my companions be- 
haved in a bold, reckless manner, treating obvious 
dangers with contempt, and consequently a large pro- 
portion paid the penalty of capture and death for their 
dash and temerity. Being of a more calculating dis- 
position I escaped the weirs and nets of the Lower 
Shannon, and again I found myself ic the clear, fresh 
water of the upper river. 

This year I was not content with my old quarters 
but pressed on with the rest of tho "sculls" until what 
seemed an impassable obstacle blocked our way. There 
was no way round it and the water dashed with such 
force through the few small openings that many of my 
comrades gave up the attempt of negotiating it as 
hopeless. Having seen a few succeed I made several 
efforts and finally got through to find myself in calm 
deep water on tho other side. The river broadened 
here into a large lake, very deep in parts and in others 
abounding in shallows and small islands. Here at last 
was absolute freedom. No weirs nor nets, no otters 
nor predatory fish to molest us. 

The lake was tenanted by thousands of trout and 
pike besides other varieties of coarse fish, many of 
which having survived tho dangers of youth had 
grown to a great size and lived in ease and comfort 
from year to year. 

In tho months of May and June alone did the lake 
trout bestir themselves and feed greedily on tho great 
green flies which rose from the bottom of the lake in 
the form of chrysalises, shook off their ugly outer 
garments and soared away with a weak clumsy flight, 
only to fall on the surface oj the water again. 

In this abode of bliss the summer passed away and 
winter came. With it the necessity of again visiting 
the sandy shallows of a tributary stream in oboyance 
to tho law of nature to "increase and multiply." 

Another downward journey to the sea, broken only 
by one untoward incident which nearly proved my 
ruin. Hungry as usual I snapped in cautiously at a 
great gaudy insect with blue and yellow wings, and 
having done so got a largo hook firmly fished in tho 
side of my nose. I jorked and mado every effort to 
riil myself of it, but though it always gave when I 
pulled, the hook remained fixed, and in my thon feeblo 
condition my strength soon gave out. I found myself 
being hauled slowly along, and finally lifted out on to 
the bank. My sonsos left mo and I only have a vague 
romombranco of tho hook having boon rudely cut out 
and of my having been pitched back again into tho rivor. 

It was many hours afterwards before I recovered and 
meanwhile had been carried far down by tho stream. 

Again, with tho chango to salt water, my natural 
vigor returned, and my weight increased to twenty- 
four pounds by tho time I prepared for my third jour- 
ney up tho river. My sojourn in fresh water on this 
particular trip proved an ovontful ono for mo on more 
than ono occasion. Hardly had I reached the rapids 
some twenty miles above the tidal waters of the Lower 
Shannon, when I mado the mistako of trying to de- 
vour what appeared to mo to be a small, bright fish. 

I proved, however, to be nothing of the kind, and 
whatevor it was it gave me a vjry unpleasant quarter 
of an hour. On seizing it in my mouth I felt an acute 
pang of pain and what appeared to bo its tail stuck 
firmly in my lower lip 

I made a mad rush down tho rapids up which I had 
just ascended, and for a few moments obtained com- 
parative relief. Tho tension was gono but tho thing 
still adhered to my jaw. Suddenly tho strain returned. 
I tried tho same tactics as before, namely darting off 
down stream, this time throwing myself out of the 
water in rage and agony. Still tho strain continued, a 
passive resistance which nearly drove me mad. I now 
kept close to the bottom and sulked, jerking occasion- 
ally in tho hopes of ridding myself of tho hateful 
thing. Soon, however, tho strain became unbearable 
and I was obliged to rise. After a few more frantic 



dashes my strength began to fail, when suddenly a 
small portion of my lip was torn away and I felt myself 
free. 

After this painful episode I continued my journey 
up the river, carefully avoiding insects and little fish 
of all sort, until I came to a long deep hole .'100 yards 
long by 200 yards broad, which soemod an ideal place 
to rest in. 

Here for somo months I whiled away the summer 
days in peace and idleness. It was not till the autumn 
floods appeared that I felt tho least inclination to 
move. I thon began to feel my way up the river, 
passing rapidly through the shallow portions and 
dawdling for a day or two in the deeper holes. In ono 
of these holes I was lying behind a rock, whon my 
attention was attracted to an insect which kept on 
dashing swiftly out of tho stream and playing about in 
tho eddy above my head. 

Knowing, as I did through past experience, that 
"all is not gold that glitters," I contented myself with 
rising to have a closer look at tho gaudy thing. 

It had a light blue body ribbed with gold, black 
head and wings of many colors. Though much tempted 
to snap at it, I resisted and went to the bottom again. 
The insect, howevor, displayed renewed activity, dart- 
ing up and down, folding and unfolding its wings in 
tho most tantalizing way. After a short while this in- 
sect disappeared and anothor of still more brilliant 
hues took its place. Tho body of the second one was 
half black and half yellow, of dark colored plumage 
and with a golden tail and back. It was altogether a 
beautiful creature, though very tiny, and it pleased my 
artistic eye. 

I again rose to have a look without tho least inten- 
tion of being on any more intimate terms with the little 
creature. On reaching the surface of the water, I 
gavo a contemptuous swirl away from it, having again 
resisted tho inclination to seize it in my mouth, but 
unfortunately, in turning I hit the thing and got it 
firmly fixed in my tail. Immediately I felt a similar 
strain to that which had annoyed me so much earlier 
in the year, and I cursed myself for my carelessness. 
This time, however, tho pain was of no consequence 
and having my head free I was able to go wherever I 
liked. As on the former occasion, I dashed down 
stream with lightning speed and threw myself out of 
the water, but it still stuck to me. After several of 
these rushes, a sudden thought struck me and seeing 
a large rough rook I darted round it. Immediately 
the strain on my tail went, but the insect remained 
with some yards of line attached to it. To mako a long 
story short I carried that wretched fly about with me 
for many months; up to tho spawning ground and 
down again to the sea, until at last all its gay plumage 
had worn away and nothing but a little double hook 
remained to remind me of my rashness. It was only a 
long time after when I changed altogether in the sea 
that I at last got rid of it. 

I will not weary you with detailed accounts of my 
adventures in salt water, how I was mauled by a soal, 
the marks of whose sharp claws I still bear on my 
back, or of how I nearly got caught in a herring net. 
The dangers of the deep were many, but fortune favored 
me as usual. 

My weight was over 40 pounds whon I again entered 
the river Shannon. This time I lod a largo scull of 
salmon who, with due respect to my age and experi- 
ence, looked to me for guidance. 

Knowing of old the dangers of the tideway I went 
cautiously along until we reached the great weir of 
which I have spoken above. Taking my way from 
pier to pier I found all the gaps except one closed by 
nets. In the middle of this one, which was in the 
con cor of tho main stream, we saw what appeared to 
be an otter, but it proved to be only an imitation one 
made of metal. There were also drawnets at work 
both above and below this gap: so that at first it 
seemed almost impossible to pass through. Meanwhile 
many o' my smaller companions were caught, but I 
and a few other old fish waited for a good opportunity 
and eventually managed to get through successfully. 

Once in tho upper rivor all was plain sailing. I passed 
many well known places and familiar rocks and eddies. 
Finally I came to iho big jagged stone behind which I 
had lain when only a little peal in company with the 
old solitary salmon. 

Here I took up my position in the exact spot where 
he had lain and proceeded to while away the summer 
brooding over past experiences and speculating about 
the future. There were many other fish in tho same 
holo to somo of which I gave friendly advice and to 
the others reproof, chasing them whenever they 
annoyed me. 

Many a time I saw others in the same predicament 
that I had been in during the previous year, but was 
unable to help them. I could see tho long lino cutting 
the surface of tho water as the helpless fish struggled 
vainly across the stream. Now and then tho victim 
escaped as I had done, but generally after a long light 
ho was dragged away, exhausted into shallow water, 
and thon disappeared forever from the rivor. 

Sometimes when tho water was low three hooks 
attached back to back to a strong thick line used to 
swoop aci'oss the more open parts of the holo close to 
the bottom. Then woo betide any wretched fish which 
happened to be in the way, for with the treble hooks 
firmly fixed in his back he had little chanoe of escaping. 
In this way owing to their size the older and more 
cautious salmon ran even a greater risk of being killed 
than tho peal. Luckily tho hooks never came near 
my rock, so that unless I ventured out thoro was no 
noed for mo to fear this terrible because unseen danger. 
All this had a depressing effect on my spirits and I 
could now sympathize with tho old salmon of my 
young days who looked on life with such disappointed 
cynical oyea. 

I often wondered why nature having evolved such a 
perfect typo of fish as salmon should place so many 
perils in its path through life. Thus ruminating on 
life in general and tho cruelty and inconsistency of 
nature, the summor slipped by and 
Tho Shannon, Castlo Council. — On the SummerhiU 
Water a fine salmon of 4.'t lbs. was caught on tho 2d of 
September. Ho took a small "jock scott" in single 
gut and was landed after a magnificent bout. — Ttie 
Asian. 



12 



[AUGUST|3, 1901 



THE FARM. 



Profit in Chickens. 



While there is profit in chickens and 
other poultry where they are properly 
cared for, and the land used is suitable for 
them, many persons waste time in trying 
to make poultry raising a source of profit. 
Here is an item which we find in an ex- 
change which shows that 200 per cent, 
profit can be made from the food fed a 
laying hen : 

The Utah experiment station shows that 
a profit of 200 per cent, can be made with 
hen's food in one year. A pen of four 
hens laid an average'of 182 eggs each dur- 
ing a year. They were Leghorn pullets. 
It cost sixty-two cents to feed each pullet. 
Wheat, which was about half the cost of 
all the food, was charged at seventy cents 
a bushel. The eggs were sold at market 
prices. Several months they were ten 
cents a dozen and one month they were 
twenty-five cents. The 182 eggs at those 
prices were worth $1.^8, which is a profit 
of $1.26 for each fowl. 

The experiment was doubtless a fair 
one, and will give a basis to figure on a 
little. Let us suppose that a poultry 
raiser owns 200 liens and has the same 
success that the Utah experiment station 
has recorded. At a profit of $1.26 for 
each fowl, the total for the year would be 
$252 or $21 per month. Now 200 hens 
could not be cared for properly without 
one person devoting at least six hours a 
day to them, and when that was done, 
taxes paid on the land and the chickens, 
and all the expenses of marketing eggs, 
etc., counted up, there would not be over 
eeventy-five per cent, of the $21 left each 
month, and an able bodied person who 
would be content to work for that amount 
would never make a success raising 
chickens or anything else. 



than fifty years has become, through 
its great extent of territory adapted 
to the growing of the finest horses 
and cattle a center of interest to the live 
stock men of other countries. 

"Undoubtedly the demand for our 
horses and mules growing out of the Boer 
war was of great advantage to our farmers 
and stock growers, and possibly the visit 
of the Japanese commission to look into 
' our methods of stock growing and to pur- 
chase typical American animals is the be- 
ginning of a movement that will stimulate 
our ranchmen and farmers to continue in 
those efforts that have given given us the 
finest horses and cattle in the world." 



Our Horses and Mules Better Known. 



It is said that it is an ill wind that 
blows nobody good. It appears that since 
the beginning of our war with Spain and 
that of Great Britain in South Africa, the 
demand for horses and mules on this 
country has sent thousands of both into 
many parts of the world where they were 
not known. As a result the world has 
come to understand the value of these, 
and looking more and more to this 
country for supplies. These demands 
come from Cuba, Puerto Rico, Japan, the 
Philippines and South Africa, where 
nearly a quarter of the people of the earth 
live. Only a few years ago this country 
was sending to Europe for much of its 
breeding stock of various kinds. Speak- 
ing of a commission here from Japan to 
select breeding animals to export, a 
Chicago paper says : 

"It is significant that this commission 
comes first to the United States and will 
visit the countries of Europe later. This 
means that the United States in not more 



Now is a good time to call out the ewe 
flock to select the best of them for reariiig 
lambs next year. It is not the biggest 
ewe that always rears the best lamb, but 
as a rule a good ewe with a single lamb 
is better to keep than the ewes which are 
apt to bring twins and then are not able 
to rear them. Do not discard a ewe on 
account of age, bring her in to run three 
or four more years on alfalfa paiiture. It 
is better to keep the best mothers as those 
lambs are always strong which have 
plenty of milk. 



Notice to Bookmakers and Pool sel ler s 



Pool Privileees for State Fair 

SACRAMENTO 

September 2d to 14th, 1901. 



SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED FOR 
O all betting privileges at the State Fair at the 
office of the Secretary of the State Agricultural 
Society, Sacramento, Cal.. until Saturday, Aug. 
10, 1901, at 11 A. M. Two harness races and four or 
more running races each day. 

AUCTION POOLS ON HARNESS BACKS. 

HOOK BETTING ON HARNESS RACES. 

BOOK BETTING on Bl NNI.M; HACKS. 

FIELD BOOKS on Rl NNINO BACKS. 

COMBINATION BOOK ON ALL BACKS 

Bids may be offered on each or for the whole. A 
deposit of 10 per cent must accompany each bid. 

The Board reserves the right to reject any and 
all bids. 

GEORGE W. .JACKSON, Secretary. 



We Build 
SULKY WHEELS 

Of All Kinds. 

(Roller Ball and Pin Bearings) 

AND 

CONVERT HIGH WHEEL SULKIES and 
CARTS to PNEUMATIC WHEELS. 



All Work First Class and Prices Right. 

KKNNEY BICYCLE CO., 
531 Valencia St., San Francisco 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

DKALERS IN 



55-57-59-61 First Streot, 8. P. 

Telephone main 199 



ASTHM A CUR E FREE! 

Asthmalene Brings Instant Relief and Permanent 
Cure in All Cases. 
Sent Absolutely Free on Receipt of Postal. 



CHAINED 

f OR.. TEN 
EARS 




There is nothing like Asthmalene. It brings 
instant relief, even in the worst cases. It cures 
when all else fails. 

The Rev. C. F. Wells, of Villa Ridge, 111., says: " Yoifti 
trial bottle of Asthmalene received in good condition. I can- 
not tell you how thankful I feel for the good derived from it. 
I was a slave, chained with putrid sore throat and asthma for 
ten years. I despaired of ever being cured. I saw your ad- 
vertisement for the cure of this dreadful and tormenting dis- 
ease, asthma, and thought you had overspoken yourselves, 
but resolved to give it a trial. To my astonishment the trial 
acted like a charm. Send me a full-size bottle " 

Wo want to send to every sufferer a trial treatment of 
Asthmalene, similar to the one that cured Mr. Wells. We'll 
send it by mail POSTPAID, ABSOLUTELY FREE OF 
CHARGE, to any sufferer who will write for it, even on a postal. Never mind, 
though you are despairing, however bad your case, Asthmalene will relieve and 
cure. The worse your case, the more glad wo are to send it. Do not delay. 
Write at once, addressing DR. TAFT BROS.' MEDICINE CO., 79 East 130th St., 
N. Y. City. Sold by all Druggists. 



GRAND AUCTION SALE 

OF CHOICE AND HANDSOME 

Palo Alto Trotting Horses 

Sons and daughters of Azmoor, Altivo, Dexter Prince. Mendo- 
cino, etc., out of speed-producing mares. All are well-broken, 
stylish and very promising. Sale takes place 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1901, 

At OCCIDENTAL HORSE EXCHANGE, 721 Howard Street, San Francis :o. 

Horses at yard August 11th. Catalogues will bo ready next Tuesday. 



Westchester Racing Association. 

Race Course, Morris Park, Westchester, New York, 

Office, Room 201, 571 Fifth Ave., "The Windsor Arcade," N. Y. 



EVENTS TO CLOSE THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 1901. 



1901. 



To be run at the Autumn Meeting, be- 
ginning: Tuesday, October nth, ending 
Saturday f October 26th, running five days 
each week. 

For Two Year Olds. 

THE NURSERY HANDICAP-(Supplementary 
entry)— $2500 added. 
The Eclipse. Course. 
THE .CHAMPAGNE-(Supplementary entry)— 
$2500 Added. 
Last Keren furlongs of the Withers mile. 
THE WHITE PLAINS HANDICAP-(Supple- 
mentary entry)— $2000 Added. 
The Eclipse Course. 
THE HTJRRICANA— $1000 Added. 
The last fire furlongs of the Eclipse Course. 
THE RANCHO DEL PASO— $1000 Added. 
The Eclipse Course. 
THE SILVER HROOK— $1000 Added. 
Lust fre unit a half furlongs uf tin Eclipse Course. 
THE CASTLETON— (Fillies)— $1000 Added. 
Last .five furlongs of the Eclipse Course. 

For Three Year Olds. 

THE JEROME HANDICAP — (Supplementary 
entrj) -$1500 Added. 
Mile and a quarter orer the hill. 
THE HUNTER HANDICAP— (Fillies) — 
$1200 Added. 
Withers Mile. 
THE RELLE MEADE— $1000 Added. 
Last seren furlongs of the Withers Mile. 
THE FAIRVIEVV— $110) Added. 
Mile ami a sixteenth orer the hill. 
THE McGRATHIANA — $1000 Added. 
Last seren furlongs of the Withers Mile. 
THE DIX I A N A — 1 1 .200 Added. 
Withers Mile. 
THE RAMAPO HANDICAP-$2(XX) Added. 
Mile ami a furlong orer Withers Course. 

For Three Year Olds and Upward. 

THE NEW ROCHELLE-$1,500 Added. 
Withers Mile. 
THE MUNICIPAL HANDICAP — (Supplemen- 
tary entry)— $2,500 Added. 
.Vile anil three-quarters orer the hill . 
MORKIS I'ARK AUTUMN WEIGHT FOR AGE 
RACE— (Supplementary entry)— $3,000 and 

Woodlawu Vase Added. 
Two miles and a quarter orer Withers course. 

For Two Year Olds and Upward. 
Au:umn Highweight Serial Handicaps 
$4,200, Viz: 

THE HRONX— $1,200. 
Last six furlongs of Withers .Vile. 
THE WESTCHESTER-$1 400. 
Last six and a half furlongs of Withers .Vile. 
THBi FORDHAM-$I.600. 
Last seren furlongs of Withers Mile. 
THE MANHATTAN HANDICAP— $ I 500 Added. 
Eclipst Course. 

j Steeplechases and Hurdle Race. 

THE CHAMPION STEEPLECHASE-(Supple- 
mentnry entry)— $10,(XJO. 
About three miles and a half. 
THE AUTUMN HURDLE HANDICAP— $750 
Added. 
Tiro miles. Eight hurdles. 
THE OCTOBER STEEPLECHASE HANDICAP 
—$1,(0) Added. 
About tiro miles and a half. 



The Fashion -gl.SOO Added. 

Thk Fashion, for Allies two years old, foals of 
l'.idO. by subscription of $50 each, $25 forfeit, $5 only 
if declared by Janunry 6th. 1902, with $1,500 added. 
To earry 111) lbs. Last four and a half furlongs of 
the Eclipse Courst. 

Tin- Eclipst — B4OO0 Added, 

THE Ecupse, for two year olds, foals of 1900, by 
subscription of $150 each, $75 forfeit, $15 only if 
declared by January 6th, 1902, with $4,(100 added. 
The nominator of the winner to receive $41X1 out of 
the starting money. Colts OR lbs ; fillies and geld- 
ings ll'J lbs. Winnersof a race of the value of 
$2500 to carry 5 lbs. extra Last fire and a ha t 
furlongs of the Eclipst ('ou rs< . 



To lie Hun at the Autumn Meeting. 
The Nursery Handicap -&X,S90 Added. 

Thk Ncksehy Handicap, for two year olds, 
foals of 1900 If entered August 15th. 1901, by sub- 
scription of $15 each, the only forfeit if declared 
May 1st, 11102, or $25 if declared by 2 P. M on the 
day before the race. If left in after that time to 
pay $50 each with $2,500 added. 

Supplementary entries to close February 15th, 
1902 and August 15th, 1902. T/u Erlipsr Course. 



1902. 



To lie Hun at the Spring .Meeting. 
The Juvenile *2.000 Added. 

The Jivenii.i.e, for two year olds, foals of 1000, 
by subscription of $100 each, $50 forfeit, $10 only if 
declared bv January 6th, 1902. with $3,000 added. 
Colts 122 lbs.: fillies and geldings 119 lbs. Last fie 
furlongs of the Eclipse course. 



1903. 



To he Hun at the Spring Meeting. 
The Withers — 98,500 Added. 

The Withehs, for three year olds, foals of 1900, 
by subscription of $100 each. $50 forfeit, $10 only if 
declared by January 6th, 1902, or $25 if declared by 
January 5th, 1903, with $2,500 added. Colts 126 lbs., 
geldings 123 lbs ; tillios 121 lbs. The Withers Mile' 

The Ladies — «.2,000 Added. 

The Ladies, for fillies three years old, foals of 
1900, by subscription of $50 each, $25 forfeit. $5 ouly 
if declared by January 6th, 1902, or $15 if declared 
bv January 5lh, 1903, with $2,ixxj added. To carrv 
121 lbs. Th, Withers Mile. 

The 37th Belmont, $5 000 Added. 

Closed for foals of 1900, August 15th, 1900, with 66 
entries. To close for yearlings (foals of 1900) 
August 15th, 1901, at $25 each, the only forfeit if 
declared by January 6th, 1902 If left in after 
January 6th, 1902, a further subscription of $50. If 
left in after January 5th, 1903, a further subscrip- 
tion of $75. Starters to pay $150 additional. The 
Westchester Kacing Association to add 15,000, 
Mr. August Helmont to add plate to the value of 
$1,000 to the winner. The Nominator of the win- 
ner tnreceive$l,(XXIout of the subscriptions. Colts 
to carry 126 lbs., geldings 123 lbs , fillies 121 lbs. 
Mile unit three furlongs orer the hill. 



1901 

The 38th Belmont, $5,000 Added. 

To close for foals of 1901, at $10 each, the only 
forfeit if declared by Jauuarv 5th, 1903. If left in 
after January 5th. 1903, a further subscription of 
$25. If left in after January 5th, 1804, a further 
subscription of $50 each. 

To close for yearlings ifoalsof 1901) August 15th, 
1002, at $25 each, the only forfeit if declared by 
January 5th, 190.3. If left in after January 5th, 
190.3, a further subscription of $50. If left in aftor 
January 5th. 1904, a further subscription of $75 
each Starters to pay $150 additional. The West- 
chester Kacing Association to add $5,000. Mr. 
August Helmont to add plate to the value of $1,000 
to the winner The nominator of the winner to 
receive $I,(XX) out of the subscripl ions. Colts to 
carry 126 lis, geldings 123 lbs, fillies 121 lbs. 
Mile and a quarter orer the hill. 



The Rules of Racing adopted by Tho Joekoy Club tnd the National Steeple- 
chase and Hunt Association govern all races and racing of the Westchester Racing 
Association. For Entry Blanks, address 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

'Mi Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Pedigrees Tabulated 



and typo written ready for framing 
Write for prices. Breeder and 
Sportsman, 36 Geary street, San Francisco, Cal. 



August 3, 1901] 



9 




KENNEL. 



Doings in Dogdom. 

Mr. S. Christianson announces his high bred English 
Setter bitch Mary Lou is nearly due to whelp to one 
of Mr. Jos. Terry's well known dogs. 

Wilmount Highwayman and Endcliffe Shela are 
located with N. J. Stewart at Aromas. Endcliffe Kitty 
is placed with Mrs. N. P. Rosenberg of this city. 

In our kennel advertisements this week will be seen 
the card of Mr. L. A. Klein, whoso reputation as an 
authority in doggy circles is international. 

The litter of Bull Terriers whelped by Woodlawn 
Kennels' Newmarket Queen is the first Coast bred 
progeny of Champion Woodcote Wonder. The young 
ones are doing nicely and even at this early stage are a 
very inviting looking bunch of Bull Terrier puppies. 

We announce, and with much regret, tho withdrawal 
of Dr. C. E. Wilson's Clipper W. from tho challenge 
race with W. W. Van Art! ale's Peach Blossom at the 
Manitoba trials. For this race all the preliminary de- 
tails, signing of articles, etc., we believe were carried 
out and nothing loft, barring accident, to pull off tho 
event. Now comes the news from Dr. Wilson that his 
dog, in charge of Geo. Gray, has gone wrong-, the heat 
or something to that effect, will prevent Clipper W. 
from running. This is too bad, time and accidents 
have often proved a potent factor in passing into 
oblivion the pettyfogging work of the "mischief 
maker" and thus another opportunity is lost to expose 
misrepresentation. 

Peach Blossom, in charge of Chas. Babcock, is now 
East and will probably be run in the Manitoba trials 
any way. 

A regular meeting of the Pacific Fox Terrier Club 
was held upon Monday evening last, at 41 Sutter street, 
N. H. Hickman in the Chair and Messrs Ford, Moore, 
D'Aquin and .Martin present. John W. Mitchell, of 
Los Angeles, an enthusiastic fancier, who has been 
connected with the breed for fifteen years, was elected 
a member. 

Entries for the 1st Division of the Produce Stakes 
for 1902, to be competed at the San Francisco Kennel 
Club Show, were received as follows: E. Courtney 
Ford's Eclipse Blanche, J. B. Martin enters Wood- 
lawn Kennels' Dottie, W. F. Foster*s Lillian Sage and 
Dr. C. E. Turner's Nuisance. 

Entries for the 2d Division: C. K. Harley's Queen 
Dance and Carmencita, W. F. Foster's Lillian Sage 
and Village Belle, Robert Armstrong's Golden Spat- 
ters, Woodlawn Kennels' Legs and Feet and G. J. M. 
D'Aquin 's Aldon Kitty. 

The announcement that the 6th District Agricultural 
Association would hold a dog show in connection with 
its exhibit and under the rules of tho American Kennel 
Club was received with satisfaction; the club decided 
to offer the following prizes to be competed for by 
dogs owned by its members: $5 for best dog over 
12 months of age, $5 for best bitch over 12 months of 
age, $5 for best dog pup, $5 for best bitch pup. Club 
adjourned to call of Chair. 



A bit of hard luck falling to L. A. Klein calls forth 
our sympathy and doubtless a kindred feeling of con- 
cern from the fancy. The loss of two dogs, one the 
Airedale Terrier Bowling Doris (Barkerend Jack ex 
Golden Lill) and the other jhe Bull bitch Baby Jean 
(Pharos-Daughter of Jack Sprat.) 

Bowling Doris was probably the only genuine Aire- 
dale on the Coast, her loss being particularly regret- 
able as she was considered ono of tho host specimens in 
the country. She was bred in England by Mr. Lester 
and was afterwards owned by Mr. Geo. Rapor the 
noted international judge and all round sportsman 
who sold her some two years ago to Mr. A. Do Witt 
Cochrane of New York. Mr. Klein who until recently 
practically handled all Airedales at the Eastorn shows 
had Doris in his string often. Mr. Cochrane, in recog- 
nition of Mr. Klein's successful management of his 
terriers at tho various shows presented tho bitch to 
him. Three puppies sired by Penhros Mustard, two 
dogs and a bitch, are now in the East, two of them 
will be shown at the coming Philadelphia show, this 
exhibition is tho hotbed of Airedale fancierdom. Doris 
died of heart failure duo to congestion of tho lungs. 

Baby Joan tho Bull bitch, died at the kennels of Mr. 
J. C. Berret, in San Jose, during protracted parturition 
on the 28th inst. She commenced whelping on tho22d 
with ono dead pup, a second was taken from her tho 
same day, a third came alive and is now nursed by tho 
Dachshund bitch Ch. Venlolo at the same konnols and 
is reported doing well, a fourth dead pup was removed 
on Thursday and she succumbod to tho fifth as above 
stated on Sunday. This was her first litter and sired 
by Ch. Ivel Rustic. Mr. Klein had great hopes for her 
as a brood bitch. She was bred by Mr. Haggenjos, 
was fifteen months old and of a very sweet disposition. 

Kennel Registry. 

VISITS 

Plumeria Cocker Kennels' red Cocker bileli I'lumeriii Flo (Hump, 
ton Goldie-Queen K.) to same owners' Ch. Viscount (OB. Pick 
Pania-Tootsie), July 22, 1901. 

Geo. S Thomas' (J. A. Klein agent) Irish Terrier bitch Ch. End- 
cltfle Shela (Red Hot-Kndclilte Diamant) to same owner's \ V i 1 ■ 
mount Highwayman (Crowgrill Sportsman-Shela) July 23, 25. 1SI01. 

Geo. S. Thomas' (Hamilton, Mass.) Irish Terrier hitch EndclllTe 
Kitty (Milton Wrinkles-Marion Nora) to same owner's Wilmount 
Highwayman (Crowgrill Sportsman-Shela; July 28, 88, 1901. 

Oscar Emerald's English Setter bitch Cad H. (Kittle's Luke- 

) to S. Chjistianson's Joe Cummings' Uoy (Ch Joe Cummings 

-Gracie Grady) July 29, 31, 1901. 

Wm. Stein's (San Mateo) English Setter bitch Queen (Luke C.- 
Nancy Hanks to Walter Hobart's Frisco Dash (Hickory Uod-Mary 
Lou) July 15, 1901. 

WHELPS. 

Chas. J. Hoge's (Millbrae) English Setter bitch Blanche (Marie's 



Sport-Dolly Y.) whelped Julv!24, 1901, ten puppies (5 dogs) to Mt. 
View Kennels' Buckstone (Ch. Count Gladstone IV. -Lady Rod- 
schatT.) 

Woodlawn Kennels' Bull Terrier bitch Newmarket Queeu (Ch. 
Newmarket Marvel-Newmarket Duchess) whelped July 28, 1901. 
nino puppies (1 dog) to O. O. Heydenfeldt's Woodcote Wonder 
(Dulverton-Fan). 

Geo E Brown's black Cocker bitch Oakland Tippo (Black Tighe 
-Oakland Jet) whelped July 28, 1901, live puppies (1 dog) to Vindals 
red Cocker Oakland Gold Dust (Menlo M -Diana). 

SALES. 

Plumeria Cocker Kennels sold the red Cocker dog puppy Plumeria 
Bud (Hampton Goldie-Plumeria Surprise), to E. F. Willis, July 
25, 1901. 

Stange & Henning sold the English Setter dog puppy Snowball 
(Monk of Frisco-Nellie A.) to Louis Weinman, July 19, 1901. 

L. A. Klein sold a wire haired Fox Terrier dog puppy by Llmefleld 
Roderick (Barton Energy-Trinidad Crisp) ex Warren Corlne 
(Claudian-Sister to Ch. Warren Sentence) to L. G. Rowell 
(Sausalito). 

Mrs. J. P. Norman sold the Boston Terrier bitch Lady Monies! 
(Ch. Spider-Lizze) lo Albert Joseph, July 31, 1901. 




Coming Events. 



Aug. 1— Dove season opened. Closed season commences Feb. 1. 
Aug. 1 — Deer season opened. Closed season commences Oct. 1. 
Aug. 3— Grass Valley Sportsman's Club. Trap shoot and "camp 
stew." 

Aug. 4 — California Wing Club. Livo birds. Ingleside. 

Aug. 4— Union Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 

Aug. 4— Lincoln Gun Club. Blue rocks. Alameda Junction 

Aug. 4— Antler Gun Club. Blue Rocks. Empire Club grounds 
Alameda Junction. 

Aug. 11 — Olympic Gun Club. Live birds. Ingleside. 

Aug. 11— San Francisco Gun Club. Blue rocks. iDgleside. 

Aug. 11— Empire Gun Club Blue rocks. Alameda Junction. 

Aug. 18— Olympic Gun Club. Blue rocks. Ingleside. 

Aug. 25 ^San Francisco Gun Club. Live birds. Ingleside. 

Aug. 2s— Empire Gun Club shoot Blue rocks. Alameda 
Junction. 

Aug. 30, 31, Sept 1— State Live Bird Tournament. Ingleside. 
Sept. 8, 9— Empire Gun Club. Blue rock tournament and mer 
chandise prize shoot. Alameda Junction 
Sept. 29— Union Gun Club. Live birds. Ingleside. 



The California Wing Club shoot to-morrow will be 
the final club shoot, for this season, of the veteran trap- 
shooting organization. The concluding club race to- 
morrow for the members will beat twenty-five pigeons. 
The prizes to be awarded the high guns are five pairs 
of elegant diamond studded cuff links. 

Of the shooters who have attended every club match 
this season M. O. Feudner leads with four birds lost 
out of 75. P. J. Walsh and "Slade" follow with 65 
birds each and Ed Donohoe has (50 scored. Of those 
who have only shot up four scores (with a back score 
to shoot up) C. A. Haight, W. H. Williamson, A. M. 
Shields and Dr. Barker of San Jose are within touch- 
ing distance of the leaders as will be seen by the follow- 
ing table of scores (March, April, Mav. J tine and July): 

C. A. Haight 14, 13, 15, 14. *— 56; W. H. Williamson 
14, 13, 14, 14, *— 55; P. J. Walsh 14, 10, 13, 13, 15—65; 
"Heidelberg" 14, 13, 13f, 13, *— 53; L. D. Owens 14, * 
*, *, *; "Slade" 13, 14, 11, 13, 14— 65; A. Roos 13, 12t, 
11, 11, *— 47; C. C. Nauman 13, * * *, *; M. O. Feudner 
13, 14t, 15, 15, 14—71; A. M. Shields 13, 13, 14, 14, *— 54; 
H. Justins 11, 12, 10, *, 11—44; C. H. Shaw 9, 15, 13, * 
*; E. Donohoe 9, 13, 13, 12, 13—60; W. L. Gerstle 9, 6, 
*, *, *; A. L. Weil 5, 10, * * *; "Wilson" 13t 15, * * 
*; J. J. Sweeney 13f, 10, * * *; J. V. Coleman * * 15, 
*, *. tBack scores shot up. *Back scores to be 
shot up. 

Tho San Francisco Gun Club shoot at live birds last 
Sunday was the last of the 15 bird monthly club 
matches. The final club shoot, August 25th, will be 
at 25 pigeons. The high men for tho season on Sun- 
day last, at the opening of the shoot, were George 
Jackson and J. A. Karney, with 55 out of 60 each. C. 
A. Haight and R. C. Rosenberg, with but three and 
two birds lost respectiuoly and oach a back score to 
shoot up, wore within easy reaching distance of the 
leaders. W. E. Murdock, E. L. Forster, with 54 out 
of 60 each and Otto Feudner with 53 were also close 
up. From tho results it will be seen that tho shooting 
on Sunday was a race for "blood." Karney and Jack- 
son each missed a bird in tho club race. Murdock 
killed straight and Haight lost ono bird (tho first one 
in tho club race) and shot up a straight back score. 
This places four shooters in tho load with 69 birds out 
of 75. Feudnor failed to put in an appearanco and now 
has two back scores to shoot up. Forster, in missing 
one bird, still is ono bird bohind the leaders. Rosen- 
borg, with but two pigeons lost out of 45 and a back 
score to shoot up, was looked upon as sure to bo in tho 
load at tho conclusion of the club race — losing liveiu 
the club race and two pigeons on his back scoro, seven 
out of 30 places him, so far, in sixth position. The 
birds supplied on Sunday were swift and strong. 
After tho club shoot, eight bird pools wore in order. 
The scores for the day follow: 

Club match 15 pigoons, 30 yards riso — 

Murdock, W E 11111 12122 11111—15 

Foster, E. L •1111 21112 21112—14 

Jackson. G. H. T 22221 21101 11122—14 

Klevesahl, E 11122 11211 01221-14 

Haight, C. A 02122 22222 21221 — 14 

Justins, H 11221 12022 22122—14 

Karney, J 21112 11(111 11212—14 

Sweeney, J.J 12211 22021 22012—13 

Feudner, F 111*2 2III1 11*22—13 

Rosenberg, R. C *022* 12*11 12121-11 

Sweeney, J. J-t 22212 12112 21212—15 

Haight, C. At 22212 21222 II 122— 15 

Feudner, F.f. . . 22022 21 121 221 11—14 

Rosenberg. I! C,t 21101 11111 S10U -15 

Kleve2ahl. E.f 11101 11011 11211 13 

tBack scores. *Dead out of bounds. 

Eight bird pool, 30 yards rise — 

Jackson 1221121*— 7 Golcher, W. J 111111*2^-7 

Haight 22011112—7 

Eight bird pool, 30 yards rise — 

Jackson 21122101-7 Golcher, W. J 21220211—7 

Haight 11212221-8 



The Millwood Gun Club monthly shoot at Millwood 
Junction brought out a full complement of members 
last Sunday. The club medal honors for the month 
were won by Arnold. Tho runner up, Maddock, a 
novice at trap shooting, this being his first season, is a 
very promising sportsman. M. O. Eeudner has donated 
a handsome modal, which the club members will con- 
test for. This prizo will bo known |as the Feudner 
Trophy and will be competed for monthly under dis- 
tance handicap conditions. W. H. Price will be the 
club's official handicapper. Mr. Thos. L. Lewis has 
also donated a prize, a Colt's repeating rifle, to be con- 
tested for at tho monthly shoots. On Sunday a high 
wind provonted moro than average scores. 

In the club 25 bird race the scores were: Arnold 21, 
Maddock 19, Crandall 14, Price 14, Mersfelder 15, Nash 
17, Nowlands 13, Jamos 1(5, I)effelbach|13, Col. Draper 
10, McLeod 9, Van Nordin 17, Dr. Cutter 13, Walker 
17, Culbert 14, Newman 14, Lewis 13, Broade 9, Head 
10, Fries 10. 

Match at 10 targets— Arnold 8, Maddock 7, Crandall 
7, Price 6, Mersfelder 6, Nash 7, Nowlands 9, James 6, 
DctTolbach 5, Col. Draper 4, McLeod 4, Van Nordin 7, 
Dr. Cutter 5, Walke." 8, Culbert 7, Newman 4, Lewis 6, 
Broade 4, Head 4, Fries 4.| 

H. E. Skinnor & Co., 416 Market St., have a new line 
of sporting rilles and small bore shotguns for doer and 
dove hunting. Special fixed ammunition and camping 
equipments for tho season invito sportsmen's attention. 
A full lino of ladies and gentlemen's hunting boots in 
stock. 



The Mountain Stronghold of the Bighorn. 

"I have just been cloar outside the world," remarked 



Wonnitz Dunne, an old mining engineer, to a party 
congenial spirits on tho porch of the San Xavier hotel 
Tucson, ono pleasant evening last fall. "I left civiliza. 
tion farther behind than tho Philippines in a two 
weeks' trip, and I found some new placer fields; but 
that cuts no figure to speak of. I found what I have 
been looking for tho past ten years, and that is the 
homo of the lost bighorn. You may hardly realize it 
but the bighorn is about as nearly extinct in the 
United States as tho buffalo, and there are more men 
with grizzlies to their credit in the past decade than 
there are who can show the head of a bighorn 
sheep of their own killing. You can understand I am 
pretty generous in giving up the cache, too, for I'm 
going to get some more of those sheep before they a^re 
all hunted out; but just now a hundred miles in Mexico 
seems a good deal farther than a thousand in almost 
any other direction, so I guess I won't have much op- 
position in my new preserve for a while. 

"I crossed the line down at Sasabee, dead south of 
the hotel here. You can drivo it in two days with >, 
good team, and when you are once across the line you 
are a hundred miles from a railroad and a hundred and 
fifty years bohind yesterday 's newspaper. There were 
only three of us, and one was a Mexican teamster, so 
lie didn't count. We were not out on the hunt very 
much, because what we were looking up were those 
Northern Sonora placer fields at a little place called 
the Cienega, over west of Alta. But we had about as 
fair shooting from the wagon as you could reasonably 
expect. 

"The desert's a fascinating place for all it's so doad 
still and lonely. It isn't a trackless, sandy waste such 
as they pictured in tho old geographies, by a long shot. 
Thero are forests of cactus, growing forty feet high, 
against ten foot high on this side of the line. There 
are great, big saguara cacti like factory chimneys, and 
that pipo-organ breed that the Mexicans call petoya, 
and bushy choyas big as oak troes back in tho States 
with yellow spines that would turn tool steel, and 
thick as the feathers on a hon. There are a hundred 
and fifty-seven othor sorts of desert growth, everyone 
of them armor-clad with spines and prickles, except 
the creosote weed, and that smells so that it is safe 
even from tho burros. But tho Papago Indians say 
it is a great medicine. They stew it and uso it for 
hair tonic. They say it will raise a crop of hair on a 
saddle and bridle if you apply it ofton enough. Maybo 
it will. 

"The greatest cinch for a white man in the way of 
deer hunting is El Humo, the big smoky mountains 
about forty miles south of Sasabee. I went prospoct- 
ing there and didn't find anything but doer. The 
trouble with the place from the Indian standpoint is 
that it is haunted. It used to bo an old volcano a fow 
centuries before Cortez pointed into that country, but 
it's had its fires drawn and boon on tho drydock ever 
since. But tho Indians say that's only a bluff. A few 
hundred years don't count for much in Mexico and 
they Bay the old witch doctor up in the hill is liable to 
start boiling his kettle any time. Well, tho deor don't 
believe in witchdoctors, and thero are stone 'tanquos' 
around tho foot of tho hill that hold water after the 
rains and there are a few springs on tho mountain 
itsrlf, so tho door all pasture in there and got fat on 
thorn bushos and slide rock and things. Wo killod 
ono big burro deer before wo had been on tho mountain 
half an hour and wo jumped three whito-tail and one 
of tho little mountain rod door and could have killod 
them all if we had had any way of packing them back 
to the wagon, but we woro not out on a hunting trip, 
so wo lot thorn go. 

"The white tail deer is about as big as tho Virginia 
doer back in tho States, but his gray hide is more shot 
with silver and ho has bigger horns. The red deer is 
a beautiful little fellow about tho size of an antelope 
and almost sorrel color. But the burro deer is tho 
queerest of the bunch. He is the biggest of tho lot, 
stumpy in tho logs and not much horns to speak of, 
but heavy in tho barrel as a very big burro or a pretty 
small mule. He's tough as his namesake at that. We 
started onedownon tho coast later on, and ho cantered 
off into tho hills with throe Colt forty-fives in him and 
ono ingot of about sixty caliber from the nondescript 



11 



[August 3, 1901 



TRACK 
HARNESS 

**************** 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



The O. K. TRACK HARNESS is the Best Looking, Lightest and 
Strongest for the money. All Important Parts Lined with Raw- 
hide. : lexible Saddle, with Breast; Collar and Breeching, or Two 
Minute Attachment Any style Reins Your choice of Pits Hand 
made. Can't be beat. Price, .... $40.00 



The Finest LAMB'S WOOL COOLER, 84x90, $5.00 f Tweed's Celebrated Liniment, $5 per gallon 

The Best Wool SWEAT BLANKETS, extra large, $7.50 Sole Agents for^ Prof. Robiquet's Liniment, $1, $3 and $5 per bottle 
The Lightest and Best Rawhide Steel-spring HOPPLE $10.00 { 0. K. Paste, iz^^'V''^- 8 °™ t€ B 8 n A d M ?S? 



We are Headquarters 

for Everything" in the Horse (roods line. 



J. O'KANE 



10 WARREN ST. 
NEW YORK. 



Write for Catalogue. 



26-28 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



m 
I 
I 



TRACK 
HARNESS 



FIRST ANNUAL MEETING 



OF THE- 



Santa Rosa Racing Association 



-AT THE 



SANTA ROSA RACE TRACK 

• SIX DAYS, August 12 to 17, 1901, inclusive. 
ENTRIES CLOSE SATURDAY, AUG. 3, 1901 

Two or More Running" Races Each Day, to Close Over Night. 

GUARANTEED STAKES FOR TROTTERS AND PACERS. 



TROTTING. 

HORSES TO BE NAMED WITH ENTRY. 



:40 Class Trotting-, 
2:27 Class Trottiner, 
2:20 Class Trotting-, 
2:16 Class Trotting:, 
2:14 Class Trotting, 

P. H. QUINN, President. 



$500 
$400 
$400 
$450 
$500 



PACING. 



HOUSES TO HE NAMED WITH ENTRY. 



2:30 Class Pacing-, 
2:25 Class Facing, 
2:20 Class Pacing, 
2:17 Class Pacing- 
2:12 Class Pacing-, 



$400 
$500 
$400 
$450 
$500 



For Conditions see Entry lilanks. Address all communications to 

THOS. BONNER, Secretary, Santa Rosa, Cal. 



$8500 Guaranteed. 



Additional Stakes for Trotters and Pacers. 



$8500 Guaranteed. 



Los Angeles Fair and Race Meeting, 1901. 

DISTRICT AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION No. 6. 

Southern California's Great Kacing Event. Thirteen Days-September 28 to October 12, 1901. 

GUARANTEED STAKES FOR TROTTERS AND PACERS 



ENTRIES TO CLOSE SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1901, WHEN HORSES ARE TO BE NAMED AND ELIGIBLE. 



TROTTING STAKES. 

No. 19. 2:17 Class Trotting 

No. 20. 2:20 Class Trotting $700 

No. 21. 2:25 Class Trotting $700 

No. 22. 2:27 Class Trotting $700 

No. 23. 2:29 Class Trotting $700 

No. 24. 2:35 Class Trotting $700 



PACING STAKES. 

No. 25. 2:11 Class Pacing 

No. 26. 2:16 Class Pacing 

No. 27. 2:19 Class Pacing „ 

No. 28. 2:21 Class Pacing 

No. 29. 2:23 Class Pacing 

No. 30. 2:27 Class Pacing 



$800 
$700 
$700 
$700 
$700 
$700 



The Conditions of these Races the same as the conditions contained in the ad vertisemont of the " Los Ang$68 Fair and Race Meeting, 191)1, M in the Bkkedeu 
and Sportsman, June 29, 1901. Send all communications to 



E. T, WRIGHT. President. 



F. G. TEED. Secretary. 226 S. Spring St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



August 3, 1901] 



15 



KENNEL ADVERTISEMENTS 



INAUGURAL 

BENCH SHOW 

(A. K. C. RULES) 

Sixth District Agricultural Association 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

October 2, 3, 4, 5, 1901. 

ENTRIES CLOSE SEPTEMBER 230. 

E. T. WRIGHT, K <; TEED, 

President. Secret a ry 

D. .1 SINCLAIR, Superintendent. 

Office — 228 S. Spring St., Room 208, Los Angeles- 



On anything pertaining to 
Docs in health or disease 



CONSULT 



L. A. KLEIN. 



Gen. Pac. Coast Agent 
Dk. GBO. W Clayton's 
up-to-date Dog Medicines. 
Literature Free. 



Room 7, 420 Mont- 
gomery St. (10 to 12 
A. M., 2 to 4 P. M.) 

San Francisco, Cal. 
Unsurpassed Kennel and Hospital accommoda- 
tions. Visi's in and out of town Adyice by mail 
Twenty years' experience in Europe and the East. 



"ill Cocker Kennels 




Palace Hotel 



In placing these two hotels 
under one management and 
joining them with a covered 
passageway, the purpose was 
to provide guests with com- 
forts and conveniences not 
obtainable in any other hotel 
in the West. And the plan 
is a success. 

AMERICAN PLAN EUROPEAN PLAN 



Grand Hotel 



Young Stock. Black and 
Red, always on hand. 



San Anselmo, Cal. 



$50 REWARD 

Will be paid for the arrest and conviction of the 
person who has now illegally in his possession the 
Bull Terrier " Teddy Roosevelt "—all white color, 
cropped ears, well scarred head and weighs about 
fifty pounds. Address 

BYRON EKKEM5RECHEK, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
Or Breeder and Sportsman office. 




AT STUD^ 

CUBA OF KENWOOD 

(Glenbeigh Jr.— Stella) 

SAM'S BOW 

(Plain Sam— Dally Dee III 

STOGKDALE KENNELS 

R. M. DODGE, Manager, 
Bakersfleld, Kern Co., 

Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-brokeu 
Dogs for sale. 



BOO. 



OH 



Dog Diseases 



o w to Feed 

Mailed Free to anv address by the lUthut 
H. Ot *v (4lovbk, f) V. 1:293 "loadwaj 
New York. 



GORDON SETTER PUPPIES 

FOR SALE. Thoroughbreds by a son of Dick III, 
winner at four bench shows in this city— out of 
Mirza, winner at May Show, 1893. 
Address Owner 1950 Grove St., Oakland, Cal. 



NTED& DOGS WITH MANGE 

, iJIO CURl TME1 WITH SlANDARDOIlOf T4R. 

5>ND ffOR CmCUUUM Tt-VUMONIALS ANOmU 5AHPU 

STANDARO DISINFECTANT CO Cleveland rt 



The Breeder and sportsman is 
Agent for the following publications on 
THE DOG: 



KENNEL SECRETS, 
by Ashmont, 



The most exhaustive 
treatise on The Dog 
ever written. By fol- 
lowing the instruc- 
tions contained in this 
I'rlee, postpaid, S3.O0. volume, even a novice 
can manage a kennel, 
breed and exhibit Dogs as scientifically as a vet- 
eran at the business. It contains 34H pages, is 
beautifully hound in eloth, and has 150 exquis- 
ite half-tones of the most celebrated Dogs of the 
various breeds of the present day. 

Anyone secur ing I" I \ B new yearly subscrip- 
tions to the BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 
(S3 each) and forwarding the cash to this 
office will at once be sent this valuable book as a 
premium. 



LESSEE OF 

San Francisco & North Pacifrc Ry, 
The Picturesque Route 

OF CALIFORNIA. 

The Finest Hunting and Fishing in California . 

NUMEROUS RESORTS. 

Mineral Springs, Hot and Cold, 

HEALTH 

PLEASURE 

RECREATION 

The Section for Fruit Farms and Stock 
Breeding. 

THE ROUTE TO 

San Rafael, Petaluma 

SANTA ROSA, UKIAH 

And other beautiful towns. 
THE BEST CAMPING GROUNDS ON 
THE COA ST. 

Ticket Office— Corner New Montgomery and 
Market streets, under Palace Hotel. 
General Office— Mutual Life Building. 

R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 

ABSORBINE 

Will reduce inflamed, swollen 

joints, 

PUFFS, and any Soft 

Tumors * 5unoh ; pleasant to 

• use; does not blis- 

BOILS, Ier un(ler blindage 
or remove the hair. $2.00 a 
bottle. At regular deal- 
ers,' or 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 

Springfield, Mass. 
Circulars ,f you vaut them. 

For sale by Mack&Co., Langley&MlchaolsCo., 
Redington & Co , J. O'Kane, and J. A. McKcrron, 
all of San Francisco. 



THE BAYWOOD STUB 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 

Imp. Hackney Stallion 
Green's Rufus 63 < 4291 > 

Will serve a limited number of approved mares season 1901. 
FEE $75 

Reductions made for two or more mares. 



Dreed to the Champion of the World. 
McKINNEY 2:11 1-4 

By Alcyone, dam Rosa Sprague (grandam of FerenoO) 
2:10J^) by Gov. Sprague. 

By the percentage of his performers in the 2:15 list McKinney is the 
champion sire of the world. Atl3yearsof age he has 30 stand- 
ard porformers, one-half of which are in the 2:15 list. 



McKINNEY 2:1114. 
sire of 

Coney 2:02 

Jennie Mac 2;09 

Hazel Kinney 2:09j< 

Zolock 2:10^, 

Zombro 2:11 

You Bet 2:1254 

McZeus 2:13 

Dr. Book 2:13)4 

Osito 2:13H 

Juliet D 2:13H 

McBriar 2:14 

Harvey Mac 2:14)4 

Geo. W. McKinney. . . .2:14)4 

McNally 2:15 

Monica 2:15 

and 15 more in 2:30 



A Race Horse Himself. 

He started in 28 races, won 25 of them, was twice second 
and once third. 

He is a Sire of Race Horses. 

Every one of his get in the 2:20 list secured the record 
in a race, and all are raco winners. 

He is a champion in the show ring, champion on the, race 
track and a champion in the stud. 

In 1900 his get won first, second and fourth money in the Pacific 
Breeders Futurity, first and second money in the Occident Stake 
and first, second and third money in the Stanford Stake. The 
McKinneys are stake winners. Will make the season of 1901 at 

SAN JOSE RACE TRACK. 

Beginning Feb. 1st. until further notice. 

Terms for the Season $100 < With usual return privileges). 

8g^-All Bills Must Be Paid Before the Removal of the Mare. 

Good pasturage for mares at $4 per month. For further particulars, address 

33 Magnolia Avenue, San Jose. Cal. Tel. Green 393. C. A. DURFEE 



VETERINARY. 



Ira Barker Dalziel 

VETERINARY DENTIST 

Fancy Carriage. Saddle and Road Horses for Sale 

Office and stable: 605 Golden Gate Avenue, San 
Francisco, Cal. Telephone South 651. 



DUNLAP HOTEL 



DISEASES OF DOGS, 
by Ashmont. 

Price, pt>si paid, S8.00. 



This standard work 
Is invaluable to 
every owner of a 
good Dog. It gives 
you a knowledge of 
what disease your 
faithful canine 
friend is affected with and how to quickly cure J 
tke same. There are 212 pages in this volume. 

Anyone securing THREE now yearly nib- 
script ions l<> (lie liltKKDKK AND SPORTS- 
MAN (S3 each) and forwarding the cash to j 
tills office will at once be sent this more than 1 
useful work as a premium. 



FETCH AND CARRY, by Waters. 



Price, postpaid, SI. SO. 

With the aid of this book anyone with ordinary 
intelligence can easily teach a Dog to retrieve in 
fine style. Every duck hunter should own a copy 
of this. The work contains 1*44 pages and is 
bound in cloth. 

Anyone securing I 1 1 1; I I new yearly sub- 
scription* to the BREEDER AND 8POETS- 
MAN (S3 each) and forwarding the cash to 
this office will at once be sent one of these vol- 
umes as a premium. 




H. H DUNLAP 

(Prop.) 

CONDUCTED ON 



Dr. a/v ixi. IT". ■ gn a. 

M. R. C. V. S., F. E. V. M. S. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edinburg 
Veterinary Medical Society: Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspector forNew Zealand and Australian Colonies 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California: Ex-President of 
the California State Veterinary MedioaJ Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital. 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco: 
Telephone West 128. 



DR. J. B. BOOMER 

M. D. V., F. M. V. A. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 

Late Professor of Medicine in McKillip Veterinary 
College at Chicago and assistant to M. N. 
McKillip of Chicago for seven years. 
Office and Infirmary— 510 Van Ness avenue, San 
Francisco. Cal. Phone: Mint 321. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



HOLSTKINS- Winners of every 7 days' butter 
con lest at State Fair 1899 1st & 2d for aged cows, 
4-yr., 3-yr. and 2-yr.-olds; 21 Jerseys and Durhams 
competing. 5th year my Holsteins have beaten 
Jerseys for butter. Stock for sale; also pigs. F. 
H Burke, 626 Market St., S. F. 



T KKBA IJIIKNA JKRSKYS The best A. .1 
C. C. registered prize herd Is owned by Honrs 
Pierce, San Francisco Animals for sale. 



JKRSKYS, HOLS'I KINS AND DURHAMS. 

Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 187B. William Niles & Co. Los Angeles, 
Cal. 



CALIFORNIA 



American 



Plan 



Rates: 
82 to S4 per Day 



340 O'FarreU St., 
San Francisco. 




Photo Engraving Company 

HIGH CLASS ART 
IN 

Half Tones and lAne Em/ravings. 
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COCOANUT OIL CAKE 

THE REST FKKD FOR 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PIGS 

For Bale in lots to suit by 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS GO. 

208 California Street, San Francisco, Oal. 



CONTRA COSTA COUNTY 

AGRICULTURAL ASSN. No. 23 

CONCORD. 

SPEED PROGRAMME. 
Entries Close September 20th, 

with the Secretary. 

WEDNESDAY— SEPTEMBER 25TH. 

No. 1—2:25 Pace, Free to all, 3 in 5 $ 150 00 

No. 2— Stake race for district yearlings, 
Trot or Pace— Mile dash. Entries close 
August 5th Entrance fee $2.50 on nom- 
ination; 12 50 September 1st and $5.00 
the day of the race. Three to start to 
get added money of (50.00. 
No. 3— Running, % mile and repeat 75 00 

THURSDAY — SEPTEMBER, 26TH. 

No. 1— Free for all trot, 3 in 5 300 00 

No. 2— Stake race for district two year 
olds, trotters, mile dash. Entries close 
August 5th Entrance feo $2.50 on nom- 
ination; $2 50 September 1st and $5.00 
the day of the race. Three to start to 
get added money of $50 00. 

No. 3— Running, mile dash 100 00 

No. 4— 2:35 Pace, district, 3 in 5 100 00 

FRIDAY— SEPTEMBER 27TH. 

No. 1— For three year old district trotters, 

3 in 5 100 00 

No. 2— Gentlemen's driving race for dis 
trict trotters. Owners to drive, 3 in 5 
(Horses starting in this race not eligi- 
ble to start in any other race ) 75 00 

No. 3—2:40 Trot, district, 3 in 5 150 00 

No. 4— Running, H mile and repeat 50 00 

SATURDAY — SEPTEMBER 28TH. 

No. 1— Free for all, Pace, 3 in 5 300 00 

No. 2— Running, % mile 75 00 

No. 3-2:30 Trot, 3 in 5 150 00 

To constitute ownership in the district, the 
ownorof a horso must be either an actual resident 
therein, or his name must appear as a taxpayer on 
real estate therein. 

Kntrauce in all purse racos 10 per cent, of purso. 
Payable one-half on nomination and one-half at 
12 o'clock m., day before the race. In all races the 
purse will be divided Into threo moneys— 60 por 
cent.. 30 per cent, and 10 per cent. 

Unless otherwise spec i lied races mile hoats 
3 in 5. 

All racing governed by National Association 
Rules. 

In all purse races noted above flvo or more paid 
up entries required to (111; three or more horses to 
start. Address, 

A. It MiKKNZIK, Secretary, 
Martinez, Cal. 



Great Sacrifice Sale 



OF- 



Ladies' Suits, 



Cloaks, Jackets, 

Capes and Waists 

Everything at Cut Rates. 

J. O'BRIEN & CO. 

1144 Market Street. 



16 



[August 3, 1901 




Glabrough, Golcher & Co. 

GUNS yShe^, PISHING 



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SMITH GUNS 

At the Cal. Inanimate Target Association, 
May 25-26, 1901. 

71 Shooters, 20 used Smith Guns. 

There were 11 Individual Trophies offered. 
Shooters using SMITH GUNS captured 9! 

Coast Record made by Edward Schultz. 112 Straight. 

Edgar Forster, high average, 95%. Ed. Schultz and Otto Feudner, 
Webb, 91}%. E. Feudner, 89*%. Varien, 88%. F. Feudner, 87J%. 
Flickinger; 87%. Shields and McCutchan, 86* Williamson, 86%. 

They all shot L. C. S mith Guns. 

Catalogue on application to 

HUNTER ARMS CO., Fulton, N. Y. 

PHIL. B. BEKEART CO., San Franclnoo, Coast Representative. 



TAKE NO ONE'S WORD, TRY IT FOR YOURSELF. 

BALLISTITE 



IN THF HANDS OF 



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Manufactured * THE AMERICAN "E. C." and "SCHULTZE" Gunpowder Co., Ltd 

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The "Old Reliable" Parker 



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All used the -Old Reliable." 




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guns winning money were Parkers: and .34 6 per cent of all guns entered 
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Pacific Coast Agts. 




SOME OF THE MONEY WINNERS AT SACRAMENTO. 
I. Anzella 2:1354, b. m. by Antrim, winner of 2:14 trot. 2 - What Is It 2:16X, g. g. by Direct, winner of 2:40 trot :i. Sir Albert S. 2:08^, by Diablo winner of 2:2S and 2:17 class pacing 

events. 4. Freddie C, blk. s. by Direct, beaten a half length in 2: 1 IK; winner of second money in 2:17 pace. .*>. Ned Thorne2:ll4, b. g. by Billy Thornhlll, second in 2:14 trot. 



[August 10, 1901 



FAST TIME AT SACRAMENTO. 

Breeders' Meeting Closes With High Class Racing 
by Trotters and Pacers. 

Scorching hot weather prevailed at Sacramento 
during the greater part of the week in which the 
Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association's 
meeting was held, which without douht kept many 
from attending. On Friday the thermometer regis- 
tered several degrees over 100, and the horses were 
unable to show fast time after the first heats in the 
two races that were the principal attractions on the 
card. The weather, more than anything else, was the 
probable cause of the meeting not being a financial 
success, as on Tuesday, the opening day, when the 
temperature was reasonably cool, the largest attend- 
ance of the week was recorded, but as the heat in- 
creased the gate receipts fell off and every person in 
the Sacramento valley seemed to be devoting his or her 
time to an endoavor to keep cool, and trains to the 
coast land the mountain resorts were crowded with 
people trying to escape the terrible heat. 

The first event of the day on Friday was the attempt 
of H. W. Meeks' mare Lady Fair, by Gossiper to get 
into the standard list which she succeeded in doing by 
trotting a mile in 2:30 fiat against the watch. 

The first race of the day was the free for all pace for 
a purse of $300, with three starters, Kelly Briggs, 
Mvrtha Whips and Edna R. Although the son of 
Bayswater Wilkes was the favorite and won the race, 
he was in no shape to go a fast race of heats in such 
weather, as his owner, S. H Hoy, had not intended to 
start him before the Woodland meeting and had given 
him but very little work. 

The three horses went away to a good start in the 
first, Kelly Briggs loading Myrtha Briggs a half length 
at the sixteenth pole. In rounding the turn the over- 
draw on Edna R.'s bridle snapped and she broke and 
almost came to a standstill. Kelly Briggs and Myrtha 
Whips kept their positions to the half in 1:07, not a fast 
clip for either when in condition, but at this point 
Helman brought Myrtha Whips up in an attempt to 
beat the Yolo county pacer if he could, but Kelly 
Briggs maintained his position to the wire in 2:12',. 
Edna It. paced very fast through the back stretch and 
around the far turn but another break in the stretch 
prevented her from getting up in time to save her 
distance. 

In the second heat Helman went out with Myrtha 
Whips in an endoavor, as he afterwards stated, to give 
her a new record. She was at the quarter in 32 sec- 
onds, and at the half in 1:05. Here Hoy closed the gap 
of two lengths with Kelly Briggs and from there home 
it was a horse race all the way. As they entered the 
stretch the two pacers were on even terms, and no 
prottier race was ever seen. Myrtha Whips made an 
extra spurt just before reaching the wire and beat 
Kelly Briggs out a half length in 2:10], a half second 
below her former record. It was a hard mile for such 
a hot day and both pacers were tired as they came 
back to the stand. 

Although Kelly Briggs was not in condition, he was 
game and won the next heat in 2:13A, beating the mare 
a length, while the third he paced in 2:15), beating her 
two lengths. He was a sick horse all night and re- 
quired the services of a veterinary, but recovered the 
next day and is all right again. Myrtha Whips was 
in good condition to race, but was all out at the ond of 
the contest. 

The 2:14 trot resulted in a sensational mile the first 
heat, and then the heat got in its work and the horses 
stopped until the last heat was in 2:23}. There were 
six starters in the race, Anzella, Ned Thorne, Nora 
McKinney, Boydello, Richmond Chief and Osito. 

In the pool selling before the first heat Richmond 
Chief, Osito and Ned Thorne each sold for 4 to 1, Boy- 
dello and Nora McKinney each fi to 1, and Anzella 1 
to 2. 

The start was not a good one in the first heat. Osito 
was all tangled up, went to a bad break cn the first 
turn and was distanced. Ned Thorne went out in the 
lead, reaching the half in 1:05$, with Nora McKinney 
at his wheel, Richmond Chief third and Anzella, who 
was sent off on a break and had dropped ten or twelve 
lengths behind, coming fast. As they turned into the 
strotch, Anzella had reached Ned Thome's wheels and 
challenged him for the heat. The son of Billy Thorn- 
hill had his trotting harness on, however, and beat her 
to the wire by a nose in 2:11 A in one of the fastest and 
best heats ever seen on the track. Anzella must have 
trotted the mile as good as 2:10. The time of the heat 
was a reduction of four seconds in Ned Thome's rec- 
ord. The fast mile had pretty well pumped out all the 
contestants but Anzella and she won the next three 
heats easily. She simply jogged in the last heat in 
2:23}, while the others were fighting for position in a 
state of exhaustion. The summary tells the story of 



their condition, as none of the last three heats were 
fast enough to tost their speed when right. 

In the race for members of the Golden Gate Park 
Driving Club, which closed the day's program, the old 
campaigner Algregor 2:11 won very handily, as the 
time was slow enough to enable him to keep on his 
feet. Sandow was second, Durfee Mc third and Sable 
Le Grand fourth. Eden Vale, that was played pretty 
heavily to win, made a bad break in the first heat and 
was distanced. 

The day's summaries follow: 

Trotting, against time, to beat 2:31. 

Lady Fair, b m by Gossiper (Simpson) won 

Time— 2:30. 

Pacing, free tor all, purse $300 

Kelly Briggs, b b. by Bavswater Wilkes (Hoy) 12 11 

Mvrtha Whips, b m by Whips (Hellman) 2 12 2 

Edna R., ch m by Sidney (Mulholland) d 

Time— 2:12^, 2:10H- 2:1314, 2:15« 

Trotting, 2:14 class, purse $1000. 

Anzella, b m by Antrim (Kelly) 2 111 

Ned Thorne, b g by Billy Thornhill (Hellman) 13 2 2 

Nora McKinney, b m by McKinney (Bunch) 4 2 3 4 

Boydello. b s by Boydell (Lafferty) 5 4 4 3 

Richmond Chief, rn s by Mambrino Chief (Maben) 8 5 5 5 

Osito, b s by McKinney (Mulholland) d 

Time— 2:11H, 2:16' i, 2:16, 2:23i£. 

Golden Gate Driving Club's Stake, trotting and pacing. 

Mr. Roberts' s g Al Gregor by Steinway 3 I 1 1 

Mr. O'Kane's s g Sandow by Sable Wilkes 13 2 4 

Mr. Joseph's blk g Uurfee Mc by McKinney 2 3 3 4 

Mr. Misner's b g Sab'e Le Grand by Sable Wilkes 4 4 4 3 

Mr. Jacobs' b s Eden Vale by Eros d 

Time— 8: ISM. &18K, &21H. *M. 

LAST DAY, SATURDAY. 

No better racing was ever held on tho Sacramento 
track than was seen Saturday, the closing day of the 
Breeders meeting, by the small crowd in attendance. 
The weather, while hot, was a few degrees cooler than 
the two previous days, and not so oppressive on horses 
and drivers. The tip was out that the drivers of the 
pacers in the 2:17 class had evolved a scheme to boat 
the Diablo horse, Sir Albert S., whose impressive win 
on the first day had given him the reputation of being 
the best green pacer that ever made his first season of 
racing over the California circuit, but tho result 
showed that they had reckoned without his speed, as 
ho beat them all handily in three straight heats, tho 
last one in 2:08}, and showed himself a game race 
horse. This mile is not the fastest third heat ever 
paced by a local horse in the State, however, as printed 
in some of the daily journals, that honor being held by 
Clipper, another son of Diablo, who turned the Santa 
Rosa track the third heat last year in 2:0(>] after win- 
ning the first heat of the race in 2:0<>. But Sir Albert 
S. is a high class horse and no green pacer has yet 
appeared in this State that has shown more race horse 
qualities than ho, and that he can pace to a record of 
2:05 is believed by every horseman who has seen him 
race. He started for the first time in his life last 
Tuesday and has now to his credit six winning heats, 
the time being 2:11*. 2:12}, 2:12, 2:U\, 2:13 and 2:08}, 
with the official time for the middle half of his last 
heat 1:01 J, great speed for any horse. He has never 
made a break or a skip, nor boon driven out to his full 
speed in any heat, and until he meets something faster 
than the horses he has so far raced against, it will have 
to be admitted by all that he is the best green pacer 
that ever appeared on the California tracks. 

The starters in the first heat of the 2:17 pace on 
Saturday were: J. H. Thompson's El Diablo, E. W. 
Runyon's Bankor's Daughter, A. H. Cohen's Adver- 
tisor, Vendome Stock Farm's Our Boy's Sister, J. L- 
Smith's Gaff Topsail, W. G. Layng's Sir Albert S., 
Thomas Clancy's Freddie C, C. Whitehead's Toppy 
and D. F. Oglesby's Nellie I. 

The odds on the first heat were: El Diablo 2 to 1, 
Banker's Daughter 30, Advertisor 15, Our Boy's Sister 
5, Gaff Topsail 8, Freddie C. (i, Toppy 8, Nellie I. 30 
and Sir Albert S. a 1 to 2 favorite. Freddie C. was 
played quite heavily for the first heat, until the odds 
were even money on him at post time. Our Boy's Sis- 
ter drew the pole, Freddie C. second position, Adver- 
tisor third. Gaff Topsail fourth, Toppy fifth, Bankor's 
Daughter sixth, Sir Albert S. seventh, which was the 
outside position in the first tier. El Diablo and Nellie 
I. were in the second tier. After several scores, wait" 
ing for a broken check on Banker's Daughter and an 
exploded tire on Gaff Topsail's sulky, tho word was 
given to a fair start. Freddie C. and Toppy rushed to 
to the front and Sir Albert S. was taken across the 
track closet to the inside and was third at the first 
sixteenth and was in tho lead soon after passing the 
first quarter, Trefry keeping close to him with the 
little pony by Direct. The two horses were lapped 
from the first quarter to tho third, and several times 
were like a doublo team. Coming down the stretch 
Freddie C. tried his level best to beat the son of Diablo, 
and it did look as though he might do it. At the draw 
gate, however, Groom lifted the lines and spoke to Sir 
Albert and he let out a link and beat Froddio C. a half 
length at the finish, with the others strung out, but 
all inside the flag. The heat was in 2:11} and Toppy 
was third and Advertisor fourth. 
It looked to the judges, and tho spectators as well, 



as if Trefry did not drive his horse out in this heat as 
in the last hundred yards he was looking back and 
permitting tho little black devil to go as he pleased. 
They accordingly asked S. H. Hoy to drive him the 
next heat. Sir Albert S. was a 1 to 4 favorite for the 
heat, 2 to 1 was offered on Freddie C. and El Diablo, 
with long prices against the others. The scoring was 
long and tedious. When the word was given Gaff 
Topsail took tho lead, but Sir Albert overhauled him 
before the quarter was reachod, and was rever headed 
during the rest of the mile. Toppy and Freddie C. 
were from one to two lengths behind him, but it was 
useless' to try and head Mr. Layng's horse. He had 
speed to burn and won the heat in 2:13, with Freddie 
C. again second, a length back. El Diablo getting third 
position, and Toppy fourth. Gaff Topsail and Nellie 
saw the flag waved in front of them, and although Our 
Boy's Sister managed to get inside, she was lame and 
Bunch withdrew her before the third heat. 

On Mr. Hoy's statement that while Freddie C. was a 
wonderful little horse ho did not think he could 
beat Sir Albert S., Mr. Trefry was permitted to drive 
in the next heat. There was evidently an intention on 
tho part of Trefry and Farrar, who drove El Diablo 
to beat Sir Albert if possible and when the word was 
given in the third heat Freddie C. was sent after him 
to tho half and El Diablo tried to chase him home. 
This was the first time during the meeting that trainer 
and driver Jack Groom and his horse had been thor- 
oughly waked up. The first quarter was reached in 
32 seconds with Sir Albert in the lead by a half length 
Freddie C. second and El Diablo third. The others 
were struggling to keep within the 100 yards line. At 
the half Sir Albert had increased his lead to a length 
and a half and the time was 1:03. Here El Diablo's 
driver turned liim loose to beat tho other Diablo if he 
could, but after carrying him to tho three quarters in 
1:33] ho concluded that the task was useless, and Sir 
Albert came home in 2:08} alone, the others beaten off. 
El Diablo was second three or four lengths back and 
Freddie C. third. The others were joutside the flag 
when it dropped. There was a round of applause 
when Groom brought his horse back to the stand. It 
was certainly a great heat for a green horse and 
stamped Sir Albert S. as one of the best horses of the 
year in the pacing brigade. 

Tho timers hung out 2:10] as the official figures for 
this heat, but the judges ordered them changed to 
2:08}, the correct time as caught by a hundred reliable 
men who held watches, and the applause which fol- 
lowed the correction was as great as the roar which 
went up when tho wrong record was announced. 

The starters in the 2:20 trot were James Coffin's 
Puerto Rico, R. Freeman's Prince L., A. Joseph's 
Floradora, Vendome Stock Farm's Thomas R., J. H. 
Kelly's Roxie, D. F. Oglesby's Almonada, and A. G. 
Gurnett's Zambra. For the first heat the odds were: 
Puerto Rico 2i to 1, Prince L. 5, Roxie 30, Almonada 
15, Zambra 5, Thomas R. 2$, Floradora 4 to 5. 

Floradora took the lead at the word in tho first heat 
and was never headed. Prince L. kept close to her 
until tho half was reached and here Puerto Rico came 
uj) and took second place. It was a hot drive and a 
close finish, the chestnut mare getting the verdict by 
a neck in 2:18$, Prince L. was third, Thomas R. fourth 
and Zambra fifth. Roxie and Almonada were dis- 
tanced. 

In the second heat as the horses were making a 
struggle for position after the word was given, Brown, 
the driver of Prince L., cut across in front of Puorto 
Rico, badly interfering with him and causing him to 
break badly as Donathan pulled him up to avoid an 
accident. The heat was a fight between Floradora 
and Thomas R. and the Iran Alto horse beat her out, 
Floradora stopping badly at the finish. Prince L. was 
third, Zambra fourth and Puerto Rico behind the flag 
but tho judges permitted him to start again owing to 
the interference of Prince L. 

Thomas R. was made the favorite before the third 
heat. When the word was given Prince L , Floradora 
and the favorite went out in front. Thomas R. broke 
just after leaving the score and the race was between 
the other two until the stretch was reached, when 
Puorto Rico came with a rush and after a pretty fight 
with Prince L. to tho draw gate, got to the front and 
won by a length in 2:21]. Floradora was a good third, 
Zambra fourth and Thomas R. third. 

Though Puerto Rico had the pole, Prince L was 
well in front when the horses got the word for the 
fourth heat and took the inside on the turn. Thomas 
R. passed the Prince at the quarter and led up the 
stretch, and at tho half had a length tho best of it, 
Puerto Rico having taken second place. Thomas R. 
led around the turn, but at the seven eighths pole 
Puorto Rico was even up with him, and won out by a 
length in 2:18$, Thomas R. second, Prince L third, 
Zambra fourth and Floradora last. 

In the fifth heat Thomas R. took the lead and Don- 
athan trailed him with Puerto Rico until the last 
eighth was reached when he came on and won with 



August 10, 1901] 



f&lxc gveebev mtfc gtxjavt&xxxaxx 



ease by four lengths in 2:19i. Prince L. was third, 
Zambra fourth, and Ploradora, who had been stopping 
a little more each heat, was outside the distance. The 
handling- of Puerto Rico by Donathan in this race was 
one of the best exhibitions of reinsmanship that has 
been seen on a California track for some time. 

The Aigeltingor Stakes for roadsters owned by 
members of the Golden Gato Park Driving Association 
resulted in a victory for Stove S. in straight heats, the 
best time being 2:20J. The summaries follow: 

Trotting against time— Cyrene by Guide (Simpson). Time,2:l?H. 

Pacing against &S8— Dan Burns by William Harold (Simpson). 
Time, 2:23^. 

Trotting, 2:20 class, purse $1000. 

Puerto Rico, to g by Sable Wilkes (Donathan) 2 5 

Thomas R., ch h by Iran Alto (Buuchi 1 1 

Prince L.. b g by Kscort (Brown) 3 5 

Floradora. ch m by Sable Steinway (Lafferty) 1 2 

Zombra, b g by McKinney . . . k . (McDonald) 5 4 

Roxie. b g by Conifer • (Kelly) d 

Almonada, b b by Eros (Delany) d 

Time— 2:18'S, 2:17)4, 2:21M, 2:18VS, 2:1SH' S . 

Pacing, 2:17 class, purse $1000. 

Sir Albert S., br g by Diablo (Groom) 1 l 1 

Freddie C, blk s by Direct (Trefry and Hoy) 2 2 3 

El Diablo, ch g by Diablo (Farrar) 6 3 2 

Toppy, ch g by Delphi (Whitehead) 3 4 d 

Advertisor, br h by Advertiser (Latterly) 4 6 d 

Banker's Daughter, b m by Arthur Wilkes (Brown) 8 5 d 



WOODLAND'S ENTRY LIST. 



Our Boy's Sister, ch m by Baywood (Bunch) 7 

(Jaff Topsail, ch s by Diablo (Smith) 5 

Nellie I., ch m by Gossiper (Donathan) I 

Time— 0:33V., I:053f, l:38?i, 2:11 '4 
0:32H, 1:05>4, 1:41, 2:13 
0:32, 1:03, \:33H, 2:08%. 

Aigeltinger Stakes, members Golden Gate Driving Club. 

Mr. G. L. Sweet's br g Steve S. by Steve Whipple 1 

Mr. Croner's ch g Butcher Boy 2 

Mr. Richardson's b m Menlo Belle 3 

Mr. Cuicello's b g Denny Healy A 

Dr. Dalziel's br m Belle Hanson d 

Time— 2:20' 2:26^, 2:30)4 ■ 



Santa Rosa Harness Race Program. 

There will bo one harness race and three or more 
running races each day at the Santa Kosa meeting, 
which opens Monday next. As will be seen by the 
program of the harness races herewith there is a good 
prospect for a first class contest each day, and contests 
attract the public. The fields in all these races are 
very evenly balanced and there will probably not be a 
heat as slow as 2:20 in any of them. The harness pro- 
gram for the week is as follows: 

MONDAY, AUG. 12 — 2:25 CLASS PACK.. 

C. Whiteheads ch g Toppy. 
Albert Joseph's br g Durfee Mc. 
Vendome Stock Farm's ch m Our Boy's Sister. 
Santa Rosa's Stock Farm's b c B. S. Dillon. 
R. P. M. Greeley's b m Winnie Wilkes. 
T. C. Cabney's b g Al Sandy. 
Thos. Clancy's blk h Direct C. 

TUESDAY, AUG. 13—2:1(5 TROT. 

J. G. Cuicello's b g Puerto Rico. 
R. Freeman's b g Prince L. 
Albert Joseph's ch m Floradora. 
Vendome Stock Farm's ch g Thos. R. 
G. W. Kingbury's ch g Lynall. 
S. A. Hooper's b s Alta Vela. 
G. P. McNeil's rn g Dan W. 

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 14 — 2:12 CLASS PACE. 

C. W. Farrar's ch g El Diablo. 
J. Mulholland's b m Edna R. 
C. W. Main's b m Queen R. 
Thos. Clancy's blk h Freddie C. 

FRIDAY, AUG. 16— FREE FOR ALL TROT. 

P. J. Williams' ch s Monterey. 
J. Mulholland's br s Osito. 
R. Noble's b m Iora. 
Geo. A. Kelley's b m Anzella. 

SATURDAY, AUG. 17 — 2:30 PACE. 

J. A. Lafferty's br h Advertisor. 
C. Whitehead's ch g Toppy. 
Ho Yow's b m China Maid. 
R. P. M. Greeley's b m Winnie Wilkes. 
T. C. Cabnoy's b g Al Sandy. 
Thos. Clancy's blk s Direct C. 



blk s by Director-Eddy by 



1 1 

3 3 
5 d 

4 d 



7 dr 
d 
d 



Entries for Harness Races at Meeting Which 
Opens August 26th. 

Free-for-all Class-Pacing, !S«00. 

S. H. Hoy, Wintors-Kelly Briggs, br g by Bayswator Wilkcs- 
dam by Algona. 

C. Whitehead, Stockton— Delph 
Dexter Prince. 

H. H. Helmau, San Jose— Myrtha Whips, b m by Whips-Myrtha 
by Contractor. 

A. L. Conklin, BakersHold— Edna I? , b m by Sidney-dam by 
Director. 

J. F. Snover, Newport— Floracita, b m by Red Cloak-Maggie H. 
by May Boy. 

2:13 Class— racing, IS50O. 

S. C Tryou, Sacramento— Margaretta, blk m by Direct-Rosita A. 
by Adrian. 

C. Whitehead, Stockton -Delphi, blk 
Dexter Prince. 

J. L. Smith, Vallojo— Gaff Topsail, ch s by Diablo-Bell by Alcoua. 
Ed Graser, Riverside— Nellie I., ch m by Gossiper. 
A. L. Conklin, Bakersflold— Edna R., b m by Sidney-dam by 
Director. 

W. Mastin, Woodland— John A., br s by Wayland W-Lady Moore 
by Grand Moor. 

J. F. Snover, Newport— Floracita, b m by Red Cloak-Maggie H. 
by May Boy. 

C. W. Main, Corona-Queen R., b m by Redoudo-dam by Adrian 
Wilkes. 

3:15 Class Paring;, S500 



Red Bluff— Prince ,L.. b g by Escort-Queen L. by 



2:20 Class-Trotting, WIOO. 

L. W. Clark, Sacramento— Ouiboul. b s by Stamboul-Ouida S. by 
Jim Mulvaney. 

Bob Freeman, 
William L. 

Jas. Collin, San Francisco-Puerto Rioo, br g by Sable Wilkes- 
Mamie Kohl by Steinway. 

D. F . Oglesby, Carpinteria— Almonada. b s by Eros-Maggie E. by 
Nutwood. 

John Quiun. Santa Rosa-Ole, br h by Silas Skinner-Eliavin. 
Ho Yow, San Francisco— Solo, b m by McKinney-dam by 
Stamboul. 

C. Denlson, University— McKenua. b s by McKinncv-Etta 
Wilkes. 

S. J. Dunlop, Los Angoles— Lucy 
Algon a. 



G., b in by Junio-Lofty by 



s by Director- Eddy by 



Cadenza, b g by Stcinway- 
m by McKinney-dam by 
, b g by Diablo-Effle 
Direct- Roeita 



Ringers, Perhaps. 

Two weeks ago a couple of strangers appeared 
among the horsomon at Decorah, la., and after suc- 
ceeding in the purchase of the pacer Shrimp 2:1/>}i 
without leaving the slightost clue to their identity 
disappeared as suddenly as they came. After the doaj 
was made and the horso turned over to them, they 
asked the former owner, Mr. Ed. K. Hooden, that in 
case anyone should ever write him concerning the 
hor3e or his whereabouts he would confer a favor upon 
them to give no attention to such inquirios. fn fact, 
they might as well have said they intonderl ringing tho 
horse. They shipped him to a small town not far from 
Decorah where there are a couple lines of railroad and 
then re-shippod him. These fellows act very much 
like the two that brought Walter K. (Perhaps) to this 
Coast last year. 

The match race between Anaconda and Joe Patchen 
will come off at Brighton Beach, August 12th. 



H. H. Dunlap, San Francisco— Kinf 
Empress by Flaxtail. 

S. H. Hoy, Winters— Rota EC., br 
Irvington. 

Wm. G. Layng, San Francisco— Sir Alberts 
Logan by Durfee. 

S. C. Tryon. Sacramento— Margaretta, blk m by 
A. by Adrian. 

C. Whitehead, Stockton— Poppy, ch g by Delphi-dam by Dexter 
Prince. 

W. H. Williams, San Jose— Julia Shake, b m by Delgamo-dam by 
Shakespeare. 

Bob Freeman, Red Bluff— Banker s Daughter, h m by Arthur 
Wilkes-SunHower by Winthrop. 

J. L. Smith, Vallejo— Gall Topsail, Ch 8 by Diablo-Bell by Alcona. 

Ed Graser, Riverside— Nellie I., ch m by Gossiper. 

H. D. Brown, Oakland— Doc Wilkes, b g by Mambrino Wilkes. 

Vendome Stock Farm, San Josi — Our Boy's Sister, ch m by Bay- 
wood-dam by Wapsie. 

Mrs. C. W. Burgess, Woodland— Stanford R.; b h by Juanita-Suze 
by Director. 

3:20 Class -Pacing, W400. 

M. Hart, San Francisco— Hermia, br m by Soudan-Hattie by 
Tom Patchen. 

T. C. Cabney, Eureka— Al Sandy, b g by Wayland W.-Rapidan 
by Overland 

C. Whitehead, Stockton— Toppy, ch g by Delphi-dam by Dexter 
Prince. 

W. H. Williams, San Jose— Julia Shake 
Shakespeare. 

H. D. Brown, Oakland— Miramonte, b m by Diablo-dam by 
Cresco. 

Vendome Stock Farm, San Jose— Our Boy's Sister, ch m by Bay 
wood-dam by Wapsie. 

Jno Donahue, Riverside— Midnight, blk g by Nutford-dam by 
Grandee. 

Mrs. C. W. Burgess, Woodland— Stanford R., b h by Juanita-Suze 
by Director. 

3:30 Class— Pacing, W400. 

T. C. Cabney, Eureka— Al Sandy, b g by Wayland W.-Rapidan 
by Overland. 

C. Whitehead, Stockton— Toppy, ch g by Delphi-dam by Dexter 
Prince. 

Bob Freeman, Red BlulT— Banker's Daughter, b m by Arthur 
Wilkes-Sunflower by Winthrop. 

H. H. Helman, San Jose— Montanic, br s by Chehalis-dam by 
Hamboy. 

Geo. Trank, Chico— Harry J., b g by Reavis Steinway-dam by 
Singleton. 

Ed Lafferty, Pleasanton— Advertisor, br h by Advertiser— Al" 
fredetta by Steinway. 

W. Mastin, Woodland— Penrose, b g by Falrose-dam by Brig- 
adier. 

Ho Yow, San Francisco— China Maid, b m by McKiuney-Blanch- 
ward by Onward. 

Valencia Stock Farm, Arrowhead— Direct Heir, br s by Direct- 
Bet Madison by James Madison. 

C. R. McNeil, Fresno— El Rayo, ch g by Nephew Jr.-dam by 
Secretary. 

John Donahue, Riverside— Richard B., b c by Woolsey-dam by 
Ten Broeck. 

3:13 Class Trotting, Kft/iOO. 

M.Hart, San Francisco -Dora Doe, b m by Don Lowell-dam by 
Brigadier. 

T. C. Cabney, Eureka— Jack W., ch s by Waldstoin-dam by 
Sidney. 

Geo. A. Kelly, Dayton, Wash.— Anzella, b m by Autrim-Hazcl 
Kirk by Alwood. 
R. Noble, Fortuna— Iora, b m by Ira-Daisy Haywoo